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Ducati and Cromwell release "sportclassic" helmets

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http://www.ducati.com/company/pud/pud.jhtml

I like it, but i wouldn´t use it.. Maybe in town..

Some more colors here.
http://thekneeslider.com/motorcycle-helmet/cromwell-vintage-motorcycle-helmets.php

Safety Standards – The helmet has full European ECE R22-05 approval.
Shell Construction - Ultra-light polycarbonate composite.
Shell trim – Eco-leather.
Lining – Durable yet luxurious washable, anti-bacterial, anti-allergenic lining complements the eco-leather trim.
Visor – Lexan wrap-around with anti-fog coating. The sliding visor mechanism is unique to the Cromwell range.
Fastening – Double “D” ring with eco-leather tab. Nylon chin strap with eco-leather chin pad.
Colours – Jaguar Green, Imperial Blue, Smoky Grey, Polish Cream
Sizes – XXS-51cm, XS-53cm, S-55cm, M-57cm, L-59cm, XL-61cm, XXL-63cm.
  • Hey Everyone! Enter your bike HERE to be a part of this months Bike of the Month Challenge!
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MultiModerator
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Interesting, maybe for riding my scooter around. I like the Sport Classis models, but one place I prefer not to go retro is my helmet, prefer the safety of a full face.
 

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I always watch these threads with a mixture of amusement and irritation.
Amusement?
We know that we're seven time more likely to die on a bike than in a car (Aussie statistics), then get very opinionated about helmet choice.
Irritation?
The pressure that's applied to those of us who choose to wear an open-face helmet, with the assumption that you'd have to be some sort of idiot to make that choice. In 36 years of riding, I've rarely chosen to wear a full-face helmet. The two serious accidents that I had in the 70s happened when I was wearing an open-faced helmet, and both involved only leg injuries. Maybe my next accident will destroy my face, but it's my face. Most of the time I see this type of discussion I ignore it, because I know the futility of defending my freedom to choose.
 

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Master of Bumnitude
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Most of the time I see this type of discussion I ignore it, because I know the futility of defending my freedom to choose.
Pjay, keep sounding til your dead in the throat. Fortunately for us our ancestors did.

-don

"Some things matter, some things need to be said, some things need to be defended." -Charles Krauthammer​
 

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IHMC Est. 2010
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I used to be somewhat ambivalent about full faced helmets as a kid until one of my best friends ground the better part of his chin off in a crash. To each his own. You never really need a full face helmet...until you need it.:eek:
 

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I always watch these threads with a mixture of amusement and irritation.
...
Most of the time I see this type of discussion I ignore it, because I know the futility of defending my freedom to choose.
I always watch comments like those with a mixture of amusement and irritation when I see someone defending their "freedom of choice" while taking issue with someone else's "freedom of expression."

My right to say your an idiot (should I think you are) is far more clearly protected than your "right" to choose less protection. I happen to think you should have the right to choose as good, crappy, or non-existent a helmet as you like, but you don't.

The reality is that you have no such right in any of the western countries I'm familiar with, nor do you have any right to drive: it is considered a privilege, and privileges can be taken away pretty much at will. You have the privilege to wear whatever helmet you like (including none) in some states and countries, but it can be legislated away whenever they get a hankering to do so - and most already have legislated it away. "Rights" are rather different, and in most of the countries of which I'm speaking, we have an inalienable right to tell someone what a bad idea open face helmets are...

over

and over

and over.




Just exercising those rights - the real ones. ;)
 

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Master of Bumnitude
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Working in a Harvard teaching hospital I have heard over again how riding a motorcycle is a bad idea. From where they are coming from - that safety and physical well-being is primary - there is no logical, data driven, argument against that POV.

When I was raising my son (and living in an urban environment) I stopped riding a motorcycle. From where I was standing then and my own evaluation of my personal rights/duties equation, that was the right thing to do. But I never chastised others with young dependent children who continued to ride.

The same is true re protective gear. I wear it but respect that other's value system regarding risk and pleasure can be different from my own.

Few people IMO are more destructive of human happiness than do gooders. Not because doing good is bad but because few 'do gooders' actually do good.

Re helmets and the like: If you know something that others do not by all means share it. Beyond that you are to me just another set of self-pleasing loud pipes.

-don
 

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Master of Bumnitude
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The reality is that you have no such right in any of the western countries I'm familiar with, nor do you have any right to drive: it is considered a privilege
Before Magna Carta that was true of almost everything we call a "right." And even therein the "rights" were simply contractually agreed to privileges.

The extraordinary document called The Declaration of Independence was (and is) extraordinary because it saw freedom - including the pursuit of personal happiness - as inalienable; inherent and not bestowed by human society.

One of the continuing tensions in the American Experiment is due to our finding it difficult to live up to that ideal. Indeed the so-called "anti federalists" (the people who opposed the present constitution) did so for largely that very reason. And whats more they in some cases opposed the "Bill of Rights" that make up the first ten amendments to that constitution for the very reason that enumerating a series of "rights" incorrectly suggests (in their [and my] opinion) that others are not inherent.

Yes, I know, this a just a bit off subject so I'll stop here.

(See, I've got loud pipes too!) :D

-don
 

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MajorSoftie.
I could not disagree with you more about helmets and the concept of rights (sorry to the OP for the thread hijack!) We are free to choose which form of transport, despite the inherent risk factor involved. On the radio yesterday, Queensland Transport stated that motorcyclists were 30 times more likely to die in a car accident than car drivers. We live in an increasingly risk averse society. I cannot have a doormat outside my classroom, because one of my adult students might slip and sue. Our ability to choose (I still like the word freedom!) is gradually being eroded by governments in a whole range of environments, so that we will all eventually exist in some sort of legislated cotton wool cocoon. Not the kind of world I want to live in, or leave for my grandchildren. Your freedom of expression is fine, but I object to fellow motorcyclists trying to impose 'rules' above and beyond the already extensive list of rules to 'protect' us. Just maybe, if open face helmets pose the level of threat that you believe, full face helmets would be mandated by your government and mine. That will probably happen in due course, partly because of the pressure applied by motorcyclists themselves. In the meantime, I have the RIGHT to choose, and I will.
 

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Sorry pjay, your "right" to wear faulty protection does actually negatively affect me. Because of your "choice" my insurance rates go up with every face plant by someone not wearing a helmet or not wearing sufficient protection. If you want the "right" to your choice, I will gladly be quiet as long as you fully carry the burden of your choice. I don't want to be your parent and I despise the nanny state as much as the next freedom loving biker. but alas, I fear you have vastly simplified a complex issue. Good luck nonetheless in cheating the odds with an open face helmet.

They are truly beautiful helmets though.

 

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A few flaws of logic there mopgcw!!! My choice of helmet in Australia won't impact on your insurance premium... Do the millions of helmetless riders in India add to your insurance premiums too?:eek: I wear a Shoei fibreglass helmet that meets all safety requirements in my country, and you describe it as 'faulty protection' - that's an example of faulty reasoning!:confused:

My point, which obviously is way too subtle, is that if you want to mandate full face helmets, you should also mandate full leathers, spine protectors, or better still, ban motorcycles altogether.

More time riding, less time in front of a keyboard, that's my new financial year resolution ;)
 

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A few flaws of logic there mopgcw!!! My point, which obviously is way too subtle, is that if you want to mandate full face helmets, you should also mandate full leathers, spine protectors, or better still, ban motorcycles altogether.
Actually there are a few flaws in your logic because none of us have suggested mandating full face helmets. Several of us have said that we prefer full face helmets but we have all spoken up for the right to choose.
 

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A few flaws of logic there mopgcw!!! My choice of helmet in Australia won't impact on your insurance premium... Do the millions of helmetless riders in India add to your insurance premiums too?:eek: I wear a Shoei fibreglass helmet that meets all safety requirements in my country, and you describe it as 'faulty protection' - that's an example of faulty reasoning!:confused:

My point, which obviously is way too subtle, is that if you want to mandate full face helmets, you should also mandate full leathers, spine protectors, or better still, ban motorcycles altogether.

More time riding, less time in front of a keyboard, that's my new financial year resolution ;)

pjay, you have localized a general point -- you may be correct, your choice probably does not affect my insurance rates and taxes. But the point still applies to the issue. U.S. riders who make the same choice, do affect my insurance rates and taxes. And your choice certainly affects the cost to your fellow Australians.

As geospencer noted, I am not proposing or supporting mandating anything, but simply suggest you may want to consider how our choices have impacts subtle and not so subtle on others.

And as far as relying on government standards to determine whether your safety is adequately protected, well, I am sure we have all seen enough fine examples of that in operation -- pinto anyone??

Interesting discussion nonetheless, so thanks.

The weather here is supposed to be nice, and the family is away, so I agree, I am off the keyboard and on the road.

ride safe :)
 
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