Ducati.ms - The Ultimate Ducati Forum banner

1 - 20 of 39 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
251 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
At 42 yrs Young I've come to the realization that lately I enjoy riding on the track alot more than riding on the street. I am desperately enamored with my 06 SC1000 Se #23 and have enjoyed riding the piss out of it at the local track. Alas my dilemma is: do I keep my SC and improve on its suspension and performance ($$$) or do I trade it in for a cookie cutter boy racer wanna be?($$) In aiding in the decision making what would your suggestions be for real world performance improvements that would make my bike more track friendly (not track specific). Mods so far are ZARD exhaust, PCIII and a WASP steering Damper. When making your suggestions please remember: 1)my kid needs diapers, 2)my wife loves shoes and 3)Juniors' College fund is running on empty...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
603 Posts
Used "cookie cutter boy racers" from japan are relatively inexpensive. Maybe keep the duc and do a track bike out of one of those. Or were you thinking staying Italian. in that case a 748 or 848 could be used for both street& track. Miles ahead of a sport classic (as much as we like them) once you get on the track. You are in a tuff spot, I feel for ya!!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,176 Posts
If you really enjoy riding your Duc, keep it. Incrementally improve the performance cheaply by replacing things one step at a time.

First, replace the wheels (cheaply, with three- or five-spoke Marchesinis off a Monster (can be had for around $500).

Second, go to things like suspension (either going with Monster S4/S4R forks - roughly $350) or a full re-do by sending your existing forks to one of the several companies that will rebuild the internals (roughly $750). Do not waste big bucks on Ohlins - you can do better for a lot less. Eventually replace the stock rear shock, but only when you realize it's holding you back.

Third, get the motor tuned, to correct the mixture from the stock settings that were designed to pass EPA requirements. No need to blow big $$ on major mods, just correct the stock settings for a start.

Finally, find a good school to get the track fundamentals to build upon.

That should be a relatively cost-effective beginning! Good luck and keep us informed!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
251 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Regarding the suspension, will any of the fork kits allow for any adjustments? Would the monster Forks? :confused:
Also, would you recomend any intake adjustments such as different filters/ air box mods? :think:
And lastly, yes I believe I have found a good school to build upon. Thanks for your input:D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,133 Posts
do I keep my SC and improve on its suspension and performance ($$$)
For the cost of this, you could easily find a used SV650 or older Japanese 600 already track prepped. Keep the Duc for the street, and for drooling over, and the cheap bike for the track. Just a thought.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
93 Posts
Logic doesn't make sense sometimes

"At 42 yrs Young I've come to the realization that lately I enjoy riding on the track alot more than riding on the street"

I considered buying a 748 to pursue my love of track riding but couldn't do it as I was progressing nicely on the GT. You are required to ride smart and hard with less horsepower and handling compared to the muscle sports bikes. Which, at the end of the day is very satisfying. The other respect I have for the bike is that it is not a show pony. It can take an absolute trashing with out screaming and breaking.

I am disapointed at the money I have spent on my GT. Some of it was naive but I bought some good shit, particually suspension. The front just needs the right springs and oil, back end is the element of corner speed and I went Ohlins ( set up by a pro Ohlins quy who knows)with no regrets. They make the bike competitive.

Maybe next season my young kids will be on to me to buy the race bike but I'm not so sure.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
258 Posts
As you are on a budget I think getting:

a) rid of disposable diapers and getting cloth ones will save you loads and then personally doing all the cleaning and washing of them will get you anything else you want.

b) a track prepped used Japanese bike would be the best option.

I don't know what the prices are in the States for these bikes but I can get a 600-1000cc Japanese track prepped bike for about AUS$6000 (US$4800). Sometimes the deal includes the trailer to get the bike to the track as well. So given that things in the States are usually cheaper, why would you risk totalling your pride and joy on the track if a specialised Japanese bike is available for about the same cost as prepping your Sports Classic? So I think backhome77's advice is on the money.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,176 Posts
Regarding the suspension, will any of the fork kits allow for any adjustments? Would the monster Forks? :confused:
The forks from the Monster S4, S4R, and ST4 are all at least partially adjustable. With the fork kits added to the stock Marzocchis, there is often less adjustment, but they will be set-up a lot better than even the Ducati perforomance Ohlins (not Ohlins' best product . . .), so adjustability for this bike is not such an issue. ThunderDuc uses the Traxxion Dynamics kit in his race bike and did quite well racing with the upgraded stockers.

Also, would you recomend any intake adjustments such as different filters/ air box mods? :think:
Like I noted, at first I would focus on the things that are cheaply and easily improved. Swapping out the wheels first is important, as it will (cheaply) make a massive improvement, and then when you upgrade the suspension you will be doing so with the (much) lighter wheels in mind. Once you get into motor upgrades, I would certainly encourage a look At Wasp1000's new intake and ECU upgrade, but that is a lot more $$ than the items I listed above.

And lastly, yes I believe I have found a good school to build upon. Thanks for your input:D
As far as improving your track experience, this is the best investment you will make. Again, good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
517 Posts
maxpr1: I hear ya!!
This has been my struggle since the first time I took the SC to the track! Track riding is my new addiction!!
The SC is too nice to drop, and I'm always careful riding it to less than it's potential, just to be on the safer side.
I love it so much that I do not want to sell it, and even if I continue with the upgrades, she'd be too precious to ride hard on the track!!
My opinion is to get a decent 748, or kawi/yami/suzi, or like Backhome77's suggestion - an SV650 would be ideal! you'de be comfortable kicking ass, and not worrying about expensive replacement parts in case of a drop...

First, replace the wheels (cheaply, with three- or five-spoke Marchesinis off a Monster (can be had for around $500).
Spezjag: seriously? everything I find on ebay is more than a $1000... Do you have a source to share with us?

Anyway, I'm getting married next summer, and the mods budget has been cut back!!! But might be able to squeez in this essential upgrade!!!

Good school suggestion: Keith Code riding school is awesome!!! I learned more in one day on the track than in all my 15 years of street riding!

Good luck with your decision,

~k
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,177 Posts
check the WERA board for used setup racers(sv).

or keep the sc as your track bike, the only mods you'll need is suspension
plus they crash much better than SV.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,625 Posts
totally agree with getting a used jap trackbike - much cheaper to buy, much cheaper to maintain, much cheaper to get parts, and you can strip off all the street-required stuff and not worry about the bodywork. fact is, if you are serious about pushing your skills on the track you will drop it sooner or later and it will hurt so much less with a disposable rice burner.

if you check your local circuit forums you're bound to find plenty of them available super cheap, with most of the important mods already done. you will probably wind up spending about the same with the second bike as you would making your sport really competitive anyway.

not to mention that a light, revvy inline 4 with great suspension and a track-focused design is a friggin blast to ride!

keep your duc for all the things you love about it (soul, style, character, fun, etc.) and go thrash the trackbike for the pure racing thrill.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
180 Posts
or alternatively build what YOU want, not what the factories dictate you should have

use this as a base line for what's possible

http://www.asphaltandrubber.com/bikes/ncr-corse-millona-shot-aircooled-desmo-fun/

You will find a well set up 1000DS engine in a superb rolling chassis will stick with most 600cc Jap tupperware torpedos'. Go the extra mile with a big bore 1080cc kit and lightweight rims and you will find your self mixing it up with them.

It may not be the cheapest way to go or quickest way to get a bike on the track but I can guarantee it will be the most fulfilling way to go

My race bike is now down to 149KG with oil/battery (no fuel) and still runs a stock 1000DS with starter motor. Can't wait to fit the 1080cc big bore kit and cams. You'll find build pics at my blog www.teamhustler.net



I have an 05 R1, set up for the track (slipper - Ohlins etc) but its only good for thrill of the power and speed, it feels bland and uninspired, without soul.

My RAD02 and even the little TT2 Ducati are so engaging that you get involved in riding as opposed to merely circulating at speed.





If you have to go of the shelf, then find a 749R, they are simply perfect!!! *I own a 916 and 1098s as well but the 749R was the only one good to go straight out of the box

Anyway that's my 2c worth, good luck with it!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,176 Posts
Spezjag: seriously? everything I find on ebay is more than a $1000... Do you have a source to share with us?
I just did a generic eBay search from their home page, using :ducati wheels" and found a half-dozen sets in the right price range. Generally, the five spoke wheels are more expensive than the three spoke wheels, simply because they look a little better - no performance advantage that I know of.

With the three-spoke wheels, make sure you get the later model wheels, though, to get the 25mm axles front and rear.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,125 Posts
RE: Racing/track days on a Ducati.

Ducs were born to be on the track. It's the right thing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
251 Posts
Discussion Starter #17
As you are on a budget I think getting:

a) rid of disposable diapers and getting cloth ones will save you loads and then personally doing all the cleaning and washing of them will get you anything else you want.
I proposed your idea to the Mrs...and although this was a financially sound suggestion, she didn't seem as excited about the possibile savings as I was:p
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
251 Posts
Discussion Starter #19
RE: Racing/track days on a Ducati.

Ducs were born to be on the track. It's the right thing.
Thruthfully, I kind of feel the same. At first I was apprehansive about putting her on the track, first because she's too pretty, and second because she is #23 of 100 so maybe it will be worth something in the distant future. I whish I could park it and stare at it but I love riding it too much. As much as I am thinking of spending the money for a used track bike, I think that the same $$$ could get me some of the suggested upgrades. :rolleyes: Is this whishfull thinking?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
180 Posts
I think that the same $$$ could get me some of the suggested upgrades. :rolleyes: Is this whishfull thinking?[/QUOTE]

Yep ...

get a spare tank, some light weight rims (BST carbon if possible) let it breathe decent exhaust and TPO-R intakes. Sticky rubber and go for it!

Focus 100% on getting the handling sorted first and then once you feel you have it fully sorted take some classes and go a bit quicker again (you will find that you will need to sort the suspension all over again)

Once you have it fully sorted the second time you can consider engine mods (ie big bore 1080, head porting, cams, slipper clutch, Carillo rods and over size valves)

My theory is that you are likely to go harder and push the envelope more at the track then on the road, so logic should tell you that you want the best gear possible when you undertake the highest risks. So with that in mind its a sound investment in your wellbeing to spend every last cent on a building the ultimate 2v trackbike that suits you! :D
 
1 - 20 of 39 Posts
Top