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Discussion Starter #1
I know this has probably been done before, but the subject pops up reasonably regularly, so heres how I did it:

Before:




Remove RHS Fairing panel. Owners of unfaired bikes can obviously skip this step!




Remove O/E clutch cover using a 5mm Allen key. Take the rubber gasket off too. The gasket has some little collets in 4 of the holes, one or more may be stuck to the inner mating face of the O/E cover. Replace them into the gasket.




Inside of the O/E cover will be coated in clutch dust. This is normal.




Remove spring retaining bolts with a 4mm Allen key. These bolts are often quite hard to shift and they are made of stale cheddar, so don't go at it too hard. A bit of gentle, sustained pressure on the key will probably suffice. If you try to whack them off, you will probably round the head, which is bad. If you really cant shift a bolt, use some WD40 or similar & let it soak in. Don't get it on the clutch plates!




Note the slotted post and the triangle mark on the pressure plate. This will come in useful later.




The push rod may well be stuck in the clutch control pin, which in turn will be stuck in the old pressure plate. DON'T PANIC! It's OK! Honest!




Drift the control pin & push rod out of the old pressure plate. Put something soft under the workmate (or whatever) so that the rod doesn't get damaged when it drops out. You don't need to whack it. A few firm taps will do the job.




Insert the control pin/push rod into the back of the new pressure plate.




Put new pressure plate into place. The rod just slides right back where it came from. Note the marking on the new plate (a dot in this case). Align this mark with the slotted post.




Put some oil on the threads of your new stainless spring retaining bolts. DO NOT LOCTITE THEM! The installation guide with the plate said to use Shell Advance Ultra engine oil. Yeah right. If you have some, then use it if you want to, as you can see I used 3 in 1. This will be fine.




Put the 1st spring/bobbin/bolt assembly into place, just tighten it enough to locate it at this stage.




Put the 2nd assembly in opposite the 1st. Continue in this fashion till all 6 are loosely in place.







Tighten the bolts up, do it in a similar order to how you inserted them, ie tighten opposite pairs. If you have a small enough torque wrench, then the setting is 5nm. If you dont, just nip them up a touch when the bolt is fully inserted, about an 8th of a turn.




Put some Loctite on the cover retaining bolts as you use them.




Replace the gasket. Some people don't, it's upto you I guess. Insert these 2 bolts first. They are long ones. Your cover should have larger diameter holes for these, they don't actually hold the cover on. Again if you have a small enough torque wrench, tighten to 10nm. If not, just nip them up nice & tight.




Put cover into place & insert remaining bolts. The short ones go in at 3 o'clock & 6 o'clock. Tighten to 10nm or just a good nip up.




Finished! Thanks to David at www.solocorse.co.uk for sourcing the RCM clutch cover, stainless springs/bolts & bobbins for me. Top service from him as you would expect.



Hope you guys find this helpful.
 

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Great write-up and fantastic pics. Very helpful, thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
I've just realised that my DP pressure plate came with a new bearing already installed. Some plates from other manufacturers don't have a bearing. In which case you re-use the bearing from your old plate as follows:

Drift out the bearing using a suitably sized (18mm or 19mm socket) Again, a few firm taps rather than smacking it:



Bearing out:



Install the bearing into the new plate (obviously, I'm illustrating this step using my old plate), using a larger (22mm) socket, that sits on the outer edge of the bearing, as a drift. I don't need to tell you to take it easy with the hammer do I?



Then continue as in the first post.
 

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I know it's going to be said "sure you were" but I just got done doing the same pictorial!!! I just added getting a stuck center pin out (great advice by halfshaft) out. I was just starting the narrative on paper.
Super job and a well need "how to" it's so easy to change out and people are fearful of it, I was! I received great instructions w/ my DP pressure plate though. Again thanks for your contribution!!! Jeff:):)
 

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Discussion Starter #5
ZDM, you're right, it is easy, if I hadn't stopped to take pics & jot down notes, I reckon it would have been a 20 min job at most. I had the DP installation instructions to crib from too and they are quite good. I have heard that some plates from other manufacturers don't include any though, which explains why a guy at my local dealership that loads of people bring their bikes in for it to be done.

Feel free to add a section on how to remove a stuck centre pin.

I was lucky that the job went without any real hitches for me. The only thing that was a possible problem was the push rod coming out too, but having talked to a few people prior to doing the job, I knew it was OK to slot it right back in without having to remove it from the control pin.

Thanks for all the positive feedback!
 

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wow great thread.

man all 6 of my post got ripped off on a recent lowside so i guess my clutch rebuild wont be so simple.
 

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ZDM, you're right, it is easy, if I hadn't stopped to take pics & jot down notes, I reckon it would have been a 20 min job at most. I had the DP installation instructions to crib from too and they are quite good. I have heard that some plates from other manufacturers don't include any though, which explains why a guy at my local dealership that loads of people bring their bikes in for it to be done.

Feel free to add a section on how to remove a stuck centre pin.

I was lucky that the job went without any real hitches for me. The only thing that was a possible problem was the push rod coming out too, but having talked to a few people prior to doing the job, I knew it was OK to slot it right back in without having to remove it from the control pin.

Thanks for all the positive feedback!
Again great job rob998 and your new pp and clutch cover are awesome!
Actually one of our members here, his name is "Halfshaft" gave me some great advice to popping out that stubborn center pin. They can follow your pics but just spray the pin assembly with some PB Blaster and let it soak then hit with a hot hair dryer for a minute. After that I wacked it with a punch and hammer and out it came! I've taken these out before but this one wasn't going w/o some help. It might good to do this anyway, it only takes a few minutes! Jeff
 

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Thanks!!

Thanks for the great write-up and the pics - they really help!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Ahh jeeez..:eek:
 

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I just swapped (using this guide) my 749's Ducati Performance pressure plate onto my new 1098. In turn, I installed the stock pressure plate and such from the 1098 onto the 749 (2005) and put on the 1098's cover. I can't believe it!! The 749's clutch is still much louder--even with the cover on than the 1098's is with an open cover!! CRAP!
 

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excellent write-up....I was curious to know if I could do this upgrade and now I know I can...thanks!!!
 

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Replacing the clutch cover

Not to sound stupid (Im a new ducati owner) - if the clutch cover is not oil bearing, then what is the point of the gasket?

Does it make sense then, since you are replacing the pressure plate and springs, to simply buy a new gasket?

Finally, when you replace the gasket, is it good practice to use some permatex to properly seat it?

THanks - most of my mechanical experience is with messy smoky 2 strokes. I have never owned such a masterpiece of engineering until recently.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
Hi. The gasket is there as a noise deadening measure (and maybe also to prevent an electrolytic reaction between the aluminium engine casing & the steel stock clutch cover). There is no need to buy a new one if you are putting a new cover on. In fact lots of people don't bother putting them back on at all when they install an open cover. I did, but there's no need really, unless your bolts are a little too long to fit properly without it.

No need to use permatex or similar either.

Hope this helps!
 
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If you replace the stock clutch cover with an open billet aluminum one, there is no reason to re-use (or replace) the gasket.
 

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If you replace the stock clutch cover with an open billet aluminum one, there is no reason to re-use (or replace) the gasket.
Except that some are so shallow that they require the spacer-value of the OEM gasket..... especially depending upon which pressure plate you select.
 

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Gents,

I read the above procedure and also think its great advice, with one execption. The throw-out bearing that was press fit into the old pressure plate is a sealed bearing. Whether it is a roller or ball bearing, they must not be drifted in with any hammering action, not should they be removed with a hammer. The fact is that over 80% of all anti-friction bearings (the proper name for that class of bearing) fail prematurely due to incorrect installation.

The procedure above shows using a hammer to remove the push rod. this is fine, however I would then recommend using a new bearing in the new cover. The best approach is to replace or use a new bearing in the new cover, or at any time when a hammer is used to remove a push rod. Any hammering action will cause damage to the inner and outer races of the bearing, known as "brinelling". You can read a supplementary explanation at this site: http://www.emersonbearing.com/fail_truebrinell.htm

A much safer route is to use a bench vise with a wood pillow on one side with the "back-yard mechanic" tried and true socket method to press in the new bearing. Shops use siomple hydraulic presses to perform this operation. The point to be absolutely sure of is this - the socket must not exert any force on the inner bearing race or to the rubber seal. It must rest completely on the outer bearing race, and I have no doubt that the socket referred to above does this nicely. This method of installation can cause problems also if its not done carefully, but it will maximise your chances of a long bearing life. A reasonable explanation of bearing installation is shown at this link: http://www.bsahome.org/Archive/html/escreports/BearingInstallationFitting.pdf

When you use your bench vise, it is important that the bearing rests flat against the pressure plate. If you experience difficulty installing the bearing, consider the following. In marine applications where large bearings have a close tolerance "interference fit", the bearing is cooled in a freezer while the outer casting ( in this case - the pressure plate) is warmed in oil ( or in an oven/even boiling water). This cooling and warming acts to releive the interference fit, but only for a second or so, therefore its important to act fast. I've often seen this method work like a charm, allowing the bearing to literally drop into place.

The last thing I'll say on the matter is that these bearings are not made by Ducati nor any of the manufacturers that machine those gorgeous pressure plates and covers. They are supplied by major bearing manufacturers. Any of us can look up a bearing supplier in the phone book and buy one for under 10 dollars. Yes, they are cheap as they are produced by the thousands. I have no clue what Ducati charges, but I'll bet its more than 10 dollars!! If in doubt, bring in the old bearing to a supplier. He will measure it up and give you what you need. I havent taken my new Hypermotard pressure plate off yet, but I would normally expect to find the bearing type/size information stamped/engraved into the side of the outer race of a bearing.

I trust you will not take offence to this advice, and simply take it for consideration. I'm in the marine engineering industry and I am a registered professional mechanical engineer. I feel its important to ensure we give sound advice in this section, as I too come here looking for the experience of others. I can't wait to do my own clutch to be honest! I removed the gasket and refitted the outer cover to mine just to get a feel for the music - and I like what I hear. No surprise right!

Great pictures by the way!!
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Gord,

Thanks for adding that advice, I'm certainly not offended, the last thing I would want is for anyone to cause any damage to their bike by following my instructions, so any information that might prevent that is very welcome indeed.

The pressure plate that I purchased (a Ducati Performance one) already had a new bearing installed, but I knew that some others don't which is why I added the bit about removing & re-using the old bearing. Not having a vice in my garage, I used the method shown, which I have done in the past with no problems. You have to be very careful to use a socket size that sits only on the outer race. It only took a few very gentle taps to drift the old bearing out, however I do take your point that any hammering action may cause damage.

You are correct that these bearings are easily & cheaply obtainable (even from a Ducati dealership) so it could well be a false economy to re-use an old one!

Thanks again for your sage advice! :)
 
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