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Discussion Starter #1
As per thread title. I'm going to try and remove my wheels myself and take them to the shop for once. :eek: Feeling a little apprehensive...
 

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I always do for peace of mind and it's easier to Change the tires that way
 

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No, you do not need to remove your brake discs, and in fact can not remove your brake discs without first removing your wheel.

You should however remove your brake calipers to remove your front wheel.
 

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You will have to remove your calipers to remove the wheel - you do not HAVE to remove your discs to change the tyre, but I usually remove them anyways for fear that the tyreshop may ding them. :rolleyes:
 

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You will have to remove your calipers to remove the wheel - you do not HAVE to remove your discs to change the tyre, but I usually remove them anyways for fear that the tyreshop may ding them. :rolleyes:
Shouldn't you leave the discs on when they balance the wheel though!?
 

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The discs themselves are usually o.k. its the aluminium carriers that get bent . At least mine did , the rough bastard, I always take the discs off .
 

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I never remove the discs, I change my own tires, key is to make sure the discs don't come into contact with anything when doing the change. I've got a no-mar and it's not an issue.

as stated you do need to remove the calipers. on some models this is really tricky without scratching the wheel. As protection I put duct tape on the wheel and caliper so any contact will be insulated by the tape.
 

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Apprehensive?? perhaps that is because it is all new or because you are going to work on something a bit different.
I've just done the one on my 999, and it is a bit different.
Having the correct socket to remove the axle nut - need a good one because there isn't much width on the nut and it would be easy to stuff up.
Need a good drift to punch the axle through from the left side; I used a wooden dowell, something like a piece of broom handle. You will be knocking it in close proximation to the thread.
I used wooden wedges under the wheel when the bike is on the stand, so that the wheel doesn't want to drop when the axle is removed.
Don't know whether you have to free up the guard - I did but don't know if it would have been an issue if I hadn't.
I also taped the rim adjacent to the calipers
Because of of the larger rotor size on these bikes, the calipers don't readily slip off the rotors as I'm accustomed to. Found that it was necessary to move the wheel down and forward at the same time as removing them ?? Thinking about that - perhaps that doesn't make sense?? Anyway, it worked. Tie the calipers up.
I've never had the rotors damaged while left on the rims during a lot of tyre changes - not to say that it can't happen. Doing my own now, I use the dished out side of a discarded car wheel with the tyre still fitted as my work bench. The rotor readily fits in the cavity and is protected there, even if the need comes to transport it. For next to no cost, and with a bit of scrap metal about, it is easy to set up to do this yourself.
Refitting is the reverse; keeping the pads apart can cause some anxiety.
The axle goes in from the right side, and rather that buy the special locating tool to place it correctly - and it might move as mine did when you think you have it right and then tighten the axle nut, just cut an old bolt that fits into the groove on the end of the axle, to the correct length, and hold it in the centre with a small pair of vice grips or the like - does the job no worries. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
My shiny new tyres arrived today! :D Now I'm just waiting for my rear sockets and front axle tool to arrive and I'm gonna have a crack at it.

I would even try changing the tyre myself, but I don't have any tools for balancing it. But knowing me I'd probably break the bead on the new tyre, so I'll let the shop do it. I think I'll remove the rotors just to be safe.
 

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Shouldn't you leave the discs on when they balance the wheel though!?

Ummmmm valid point!

The weight of the discs themselves would make sod-all difference in proportion to the much heavier tyre-and-wheel combo?

The discs themselves are precision-machined, and as such SHOULD be in balence when added to the wheel? Being in the middle of the wheel the gyroscopic forces wouldnt be as extreme as those on the outside of the wheel IE the tyre and wheel rim?

Mine stay in my garage, less chance of any collateral, my tyre shop deals more with car wheels which they can't bend the rotors up on anyhoo, lol :D
 
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