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Discussion Starter #1
I have a pair of 2004 LeoVince slip-ons with about 12k miles on them, are they heavier enough to warrant replacement? Or maybe they lose performance? I'm about to have the bike dynoed so I was wondering about that too.

Bike is Ducati Monster 750ie '02

Cheers.
 

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My laptop didn't get any heavier when I saved a bunch of videos on it. :D

:confused:
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Did I ask a stupid questions or what?! I would assume that overtime particle build up makes pipes heavier if slightly, or that the material inside loses its performance or something.
 

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Depends on what you feed it. Cupcakes and ribs... yeah, it will gain weight for sure. Salmon and veggies? Probably not.
 

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Did I ask a stupid questions or what?! I would assume that overtime particle build up makes pipes heavier if slightly, or that the material inside loses its performance or something.
No, there are no stupid questions. Only stupid answers. :D

I doubt you would be able to measure the amount of cabon build up. But if the pipes use a fiberglass wrapped tube as the packing burns out it could make a small change in back pressure and thus tuning. On a two stoke motor that can actually have a big effect on power but on our street bikes it's probably not worth worrying about
 

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no wonder I post once every other years...
To answer your question seriously? I've never heard of that happening but then I've never weighed a new exhaust vs a well used one. Seems doubtful though that it would weigh any more or less after use.

If it is significantly louder you can probably remove the old packing and repack it.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Ok well I've done enough mods for now and 12k miles of street use doesn't seem overkill anyway.

Thx!
 

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So basically all of you, thinking that it's such a stupid question, would never change your pipes because after all they never change in the long run?!
So I'm sure you will still have your cans 50 years from now then.

You're way too smart for me. I'll check back in a few years.
 

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What about take your cans off and weigh them? Then call LeoVince and ask how much it should weigh?

Honestly I think you make an valid point, but I doubt a little bit of soot can weigh much.
 

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I designed my exhaust hanger brackets with a 1.03 factor of safety, so they might break if the cans catch a bit of bird shit or bug guts on them, nevermind hydrocarbon accumulation! I came to that factor of safety through rigorous research to determine the probability of a BS or BG event, and weighed that likelihood against the degradation rate of the fiberglass packing material. I never accounted for the damn hydrocarbons though. That's the last time I use Harbor Freight welding rod to build my exhaust hangers.
 

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So basically all of you, thinking that it's such a stupid question, would never change your pipes because after all they never change in the long run?!
So I'm sure you will still have your cans 50 years from now then.

You're way too smart for me. I'll check back in a few years.
I have over 8,000 miles on the stock cans on my 2012 Monster 1100 EVO and I've given exactly zero thought to this. I might have Termis within the next couple years but beyond that I'll probably have a different bike. In 50 years I'll be dead. :abduct:
 

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So basically all of you, thinking that it's such a stupid question, would never change your pipes because after all they never change in the long run?!
So I'm sure you will still have your cans 50 years from now then.

You're way too smart for me. I'll check back in a few years.
Don't get all pouty dude... You have to admit you asked an insane question... Among OCD questions on Ducati.ms (and there are many with most of us wondering if a carbon fiber fender will make our bike faster at Starbucks vs a plastic one) you just went and took it to an amazing and awesome new level. I don't know if you can weigh soot, but if you can, and it something you wan to tackle... More power to you.

However, I believe you are playing a really funny little joke, and for that I applaud you. :D
 

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Among OCD questions on Ducati.ms you just went and took it to an amazing and awesome new level.
This definitely has the legs to approach All Star status. Legendary? Possibly...possibly.


I have two more questions that popped into my head when reading your OP: Why would the weight of your exhaust canisters have any affect on the dyno run?
Secondly, why would you change cans now?

Generally we want to dyno our bike before making changes, then dyno it afterwards to find out what our changes did to the bike (or how bad we just messed up a good thing). If you're doing a dyno run just to see a number, the Operator can make the dyno read whatever number you want. Furthermore, no two dynos will ever give you the same number so the number itself is meaningless.

However, I smell greatness here. Basically you have an opportunity to prove something to us all.

I propose a test: Get another brand new, un-sooted pair of cans exactly like the ones you have now (made on the same day would be best), weigh them both and compare, then do the run with the old and new cans and report back with what you've found.

You are standing on the cusp of greatness here, my friend - on the forefront of a brave new world of Performance tuning. I salute you, Sir!


Just one more question if I may: How do you feel about watermelons?
 

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Don't get me wrong, I wouldn't think that your exhaust cans are going to gain any measurable mass over their usable lifespan. But I don't think its maybe the most insane question ever.

Firearm suppressors work on almost the exact same principal as a the muffler on a motor vehicle. If you don't clean a suppressor over time, they will accumulate material and gain wait. This mostly happens with a .22LR suppressor though, with most of the weight being molten lead that cools. Some suppressors are non-user-serviceable also, which can be an issue over time (especially with all the paperwork and expense required in this country to buy one).

But yeah, a bike muffler isn't going to get the same amount of debris that comes out of the muzzle of a gun, so shouldn't be an issue. Not to mention, slip-on exhausts are straight through with fiberglass packing. Not like a bunch of chambers that are hard to get to.
 

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I tend to be more concerned with he dirt that accumulates on my tires after a ride as its unsprung rotating mass... I have devised some brushes which hang over each tire and wipe at each rotation, but I ended up adding weight because of the brushes.

I talking to some Motogp mechanics at laguna seca.... They suggested breathing out in a constant fluid manner while riding as another way to offset the Weight of the accumulated dirt, but I see issues with that also.


I'm as frustratred with you are with this type of issue... Going for my medium mochacino latte now which will help me take a huge dump... That's always good for a few lbs.
 

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What about the muffler bearings? Blinker fluid?

I've repacked a few sets of mufflers on 4 strokes, and the loss of fibreglass(or ceramic wool) probably evens out the weight of the carbon buildup.

The only issue with a tune would be a change in the volume MIGHT have a slight effect on the tune to maybe .01 afr.
 
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