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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Buying braided stainless lines today.

Galfer offers any number of colored outer sheathing on their lines (red, black, clear and so on). Can anyone shine some light on how well these colored lines hold up year in year out? I've seen pics of some bikes with clear sheathed lines and they have dark wear sections that make them look like ass ... same with red ones.

Are they just dirty or are they looking beat up from age? I'm leaning towards black just because of that.

Thanks.
 

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There are cheaper ones on the market that look good for several years, but none will last forever when exposed to both UV and the heat from the engine. Hard to see in pics but Galfer have a yellow band on them.

My Goodrich clear coatings are starting to flake off on the oil lines in a few spots after 21 years, geez - just can't get quality anymore, but at least the brake lines still look good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
There are cheaper ones on the market that look good for several years, but none will last forever when exposed to both UV and the heat from the engine. Hard to see in pics but Galfer have a yellow band on them.

My Goodrich clear coatings are starting to flake off on the oil lines in a few spots after 21 years, geez - just can't get quality anymore, but at least the brake lines still look good.
21 years! That's all?

Write up a Yelp review and slam the hell out of them. :rolleyes: ... :D ... ;)



I'm thinking I'll just go with black ones. I'm trying to (sorta kinda) keep a sleepy stock look ... more or less a "garage racer" so to speak. Not that I'm going for some "preserved restoration" ... but I want to keep most of the upgrades concealed .... think concealed weapon. Like a professional body guard ... low profile yet fairly lethal.

:wink2:

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You've seen pics of mine on here. I have the Red ones. I am very impressed by the quality of Galfer, that being the first thing I noticed when I cut open the packages. They feel beefy with quality banjos. Also, super nice people.

You wont regret it.
 

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Good old black Raychem DR-25 will last longer than you'll own the bike
 

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I've been using Venhill lines with success. You can get them cut to custom lengths with proper fittings, and then buy the banjo attachments to suit a radial vs. standard master cylinder. As a serial fettler and modifier, this comes in handy.

Venhill has a US distributor as well, you can find them on ebay.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
You've seen pics of mine on here. I have the Red ones. I am very impressed by the quality of Galfer, that being the first thing I noticed when I cut open the packages. They feel beefy with quality banjos. Also, super nice people.

You wont regret it.
Can you post a link to your bike's pics again? I've buried it somewhere.

Good old black Raychem DR-25 will last longer than you'll own the bike
Will look in to those. Thanks!

I've been using Venhill lines with success. You can get them cut to custom lengths with proper fittings, and then buy the banjo attachments to suit a radial vs. standard master cylinder. As a serial fettler and modifier, this comes in handy.

Venhill has a US distributor as well, you can find them on ebay.
Will look in to those as well.

Thank you.

:wink2:


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Will look in to those as well.
the Raychem is just shrink tubing. that is what 'everyone' in IMSA and CART used/uses wherever one is dealing with protecting things from abrasion.

shown is a clutch slave line from a Reynard 99i. the orange covering is Earl's Flame Guard used there because the line ran near the exhaust primaries.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
the Raychem is just shrink tubing. that is what 'everyone' in IMSA and CART used/uses wherever one is dealing with protecting things from abrasion.

shown is a clutch slave line from a Reynard 99i. the orange covering is Earl's Flame Guard used there because the line ran near the exhaust primaries.
Really like the Raychem. Projects the "built not bought" notion quite well. So many bikes are just "bolt on beauties", and while nice enough I prefer the one-off appearance far more.

The Earl's Flame Guard is another very nice component. Now that I'm aware of it, I know that I have an option available to me which may end up influencing later ideas.

Thanks for the information. Quite helpful!

~thumbs up~ .... :wink2:

EDIT: re; Raychem DR-25 ... do you know what shrink ratio it is? And, is it fairly flexible after heated/shrunk down?

I'm guessing that (for instance) "3/8" is 0.375" I.D. before being shrunk down, is that correct?

I'm not relying on you to do all of my legwork, I am actually researching it's properties on the web while also asking for information from you. It never hurts to ask someone with actual experience (such as yourself).

Thanks so much.


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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks for the ~like~ Member *SP3 ... I added an "edit" while you were reading my reply, did you catch it? (quoted below) ......

EDIT: re; Raychem DR-25 ... do you know what shrink ratio it is? And, is it fairly flexible after heated/shrunk down?

I'm guessing that (for instance) "3/8" is 0.375" I.D. before being shrunk down, is that correct?

I'm not relying on you to do all of my legwork, I am actually researching it's properties on the web while also asking for information from you. It never hurts to ask someone with actual experience (such as yourself).

Thanks so much.
 

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shrink ratio is 2:1 and it is perfectly flexible post-shrink.
 
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
RayChem is available in Blue, Yellow, White, Red, Pink, Grey, Green .... and it's one hell of a lot less costly per foot than braided stainless hydraulic lines. That said, it's something that is renewable ... meaning that when it gets bad looking it can be easily stripped off of a brake or clutch line and replaced with a fresh layer. Changing colors can also be done cost effectively as well.

3/8" black seems to cost roughly $0.50 cents per foot when bought on a 25 foot spool.

Most certainly something to think about!


:wink2:


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I always draw a breath when I see your bike.

Thanks for the pics.

:wink2:


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No problems, thanks for appreciating it! I am looking forward to seeing yours progress and when you finish it. Don't forget to let us see some pics along the way. I see you are doing tons of research.

I got really lucky finding my '93 750ss in a garage at a used car dealer's home, who is now a good buddy, while it was snowing outside last winter.

I had no idea what I was in for (see pic) with repairing the tank, adding new carbs, replacing everything needed including all new lines, but it was totally worth it. Thanks again FredSmoot!
 

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