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It's strange. The service manual doesn't call for the use of the tool. It specifically has you...


  1. fit the axle
  2. thread on the main nut
  3. tighten the right side pinch bolts
  4. tighten the axle nut
  5. loosen the right side pinch bolts
  6. bounce the suspension
  7. tighten the pinch bolts.


My Multi service manual says to torque the axle first.





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I think it may be considered as a violation of consumer rights. Essentially, Ducati forces you to service a bike at their dealerships only, which is against the law. How any other (independent) shop can work on a bike without having at least torque values and such? I wonder, if there is something that could be done about it?
+1
I think unless someone wants to take Ducati to court in a class action suit, it will always be that way.
 

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I think, 1260 DIY owners are badly screwed up by Ducati. I asked the owner of Aprilia dealership (my good friend) if he could get me (not for free, I'm willing to pay for it!) Workshop Manual for 1260. He called several Ducati dealerships (he knows the owners) and was told that it's not possible. Ducati made workshop manuals accessible online only. Dealers can't save or print the manuals anymore. Also, Ducati refuses to sell the manuals to anyone.
https://amsducati.com/ducati-service-manual-collection

Just wait they update this with 2019 models
 

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OK, how about one for the 1260?
Geez. This question is getting as popular as oil and tires. I think the handful of you guys asking about the 1260 manual should get together and buy it. Then you can share it for everyone else.
Lack of initiative for most of them
 

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I think, 1260 DIY owners are badly screwed up by Ducati. I asked the owner of Aprilia dealership (my good friend) if he could get me (not for free, I'm willing to pay for it!) Workshop Manual for 1260. He called several Ducati dealerships (he knows the owners) and was told that it's not possible. Ducati made workshop manuals accessible online only. Dealers can't save or print the manuals anymore. Also, Ducati refuses to sell the manuals to anyone.
I'm not surprised, but that really sucks. For me, half the point of owning a motorcycle is tinkering on it. It seems more and more manufacturers are pulling this stunt so DIYers can't DIY.

It used to be, I just assumed a shop manual would be available at some point. Now I'll have to make a mental to note to check that first before looking at another motorcycle.

Another win for our dumbass, do-nothing modern world. Great!

:(
 

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I'm not surprised, but that really sucks. For me, half the point of owning a motorcycle is tinkering on it. It seems more and more manufacturers are pulling this stunt so DIYers can't DIY.

It used to be, I just assumed a shop manual would be available at some point. Now I'll have to make a mental to note to check that first before looking at another motorcycle.

Another win for our dumbass, do-nothing modern world. Great!

:(
I generally agree, but less so with your last sentence: we know that the motorcycle industry is struggling and I tend to see this as an attempt to get you back to the dealer regularly where your maintenance contribution -- here it's around $150/hr -- helps sustain the dealer and provides an opportunity for the sales person to talk you into a trade-in deal on a new bike. You also keep the price of a new bike down because you make additional payments as part of servicing.

It's a strategy, definitely; whether it's the right one is, I think, questionable.
 

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Have you researched belts changing on DVT? If yes, I can't understand how you don't realize that it's very different! You can't just mark belt position and remove the belt as on pre-DVT models. Camshaft gear can freely rotate on camshaft on DVT. You must remove a head cover and lock camshafts (not the gears!). Otherwise, you'll loose the timing!
I always do all work on my bikes myself, including valves job on pretty complex V4 engines. The only time a dealer sees my bike is when it's a warranty issue or the bike needs to be connected to a computer for a software updates. I'd really like to keep this the same with Ducati. But I need a f***ing service manual!!! I don't want to guess what are the correct torques on engine bolts.
I am currently doing the belts and valves on my DVT.
My cams do not rotate separately from the camshaft gear, they are not supposed to unless there is oil pressure to release a locking pin.
Now the crankshaft position was another story and required a Ducati tool to determine if you are on the proper horizontal cylinder TDC. (TDC compression vs TDC exhaust).
 

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I generally agree, but less so with your last sentence: we know that the motorcycle industry is struggling and I tend to see this as an attempt to get you back to the dealer regularly where your maintenance contribution -- here it's around $150/hr -- helps sustain the dealer and provides an opportunity for the sales person to talk you into a trade-in deal on a new bike. You also keep the price of a new bike down because you make additional payments as part of servicing.

It's a strategy, definitely; whether it's the right one is, I think, questionable.
Yeah, I get it. I'm just frustrated with our ever increasingly non hands-on, non mechanical, non physical, non present, non thinking - etc, etc, etc stuff that grumpy middle age guys say - virtual world.

"Kids nowadays!" :)

As I get older, I'm coming to truly appreciate the decades of fun I had riding.
 

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I'm not surprised, but that really sucks. For me, half the point of owning a motorcycle is tinkering on it. It seems more and more manufacturers are pulling this stunt so DIYers can't DIY.

It used to be, I just assumed a shop manual would be available at some point. Now I'll have to make a mental to note to check that first before looking at another motorcycle.

Another win for our dumbass, do-nothing modern world. Great!

<img src="http://www.ducati.ms/forums/images/smilies/frown.gif" border="0" alt="" title="Frown" class="inlineimg" />
I generally agree, but less so with your last sentence: we know that the motorcycle industry is struggling and I tend to see this as an attempt to get you back to the dealer regularly where your maintenance contribution -- here it's around $150/hr -- helps sustain the dealer and provides an opportunity for the sales person to talk you into a trade-in deal on a new bike. You also keep the price of a new bike down because you make additional payments as part of servicing.

It's a strategy, definitely; whether it's the right one is, I think, questionable.
Here is 120$ /hr, =$2/minute!
WTF are we thinking?
I'm certainly in the wrong business for sure
 

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High costs = high labor rates
fewer money making jobs = higher labor rates
fewer parts sold at a fair margin = higher labor rate
fewer bikes sold = higher labor rate

higher labor rate does not = a profitable business and continued success
less success = fewer shops and more unhappy customers.
Fewer customers buy products with poor service and brands suffer.
lets see if anyone figures this out in time to have it not end in a logical conclusion.
 

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High costs = high labor rates
fewer money making jobs = higher labor rates
fewer parts sold at a fair margin = higher labor rate
fewer bikes sold = higher labor rate

higher labor rate does not = a profitable business and continued success
less success = fewer shops and more unhappy customers.
Fewer customers buy products with poor service and brands suffer.
lets see if anyone figures this out in time to have it not end in a logical conclusion.
LOL. Perfect! Yeah, I'm thinking we've seen the best years of motorcycling.
 

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High costs = high labor rates
fewer money making jobs = higher labor rates
fewer parts sold at a fair margin = higher labor rate
fewer bikes sold = higher labor rate

higher labor rate does not = a profitable business and continued success
less success = fewer shops and more unhappy customers.
Fewer customers buy products with poor service and brands suffer.
lets see if anyone figures this out in time to have it not end in a logical conclusion.
And this is a big piece of the puzzle when bean counters/marketers try to figure out what's gone wrong with the industry. Nevertheless, many people here still want to get out on two wheels. My colleague just picked up a 125cc Vespa and fretted over parking her baby at school. She wanted to pull it into her classroom. Um, no, can't do that. I showed her the parking place I snagged under constant camera watch by the SRO. And now I have a grom in my spot...oy vey
 
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