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I just brought home my new to me 1260. My nearest Ducati dealer is about 100 miles away. I did a quick search and could not find anything for do-it-yourself items like wheel removal and oil changes. Does anyone have any information on torque values for the wheels and where I can get the huge socket that is required for the rear wheel?
 

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First stop: the Tech Section sticky to see if there's a service manual in the collection for your bike.

The rest is a giant can of worms or a barrel of monkeys. Take your pick.
 

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You can pick up the socket required to remove the back wheel from the SSSA on that auction site quite inexpensively, as well as a chain adjustor tool if your bike didn't come with one (mine was used and came with zero tools).
 

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For the big socket for the rear wheel just make sure you go for the steel rather than aluminum version. I have the aluminum and the teeth are already deforming after just a couple of uses


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For the big socket for the rear wheel just make sure you go for the steel rather than aluminum version. I have the aluminum and the teeth are already deforming after just a couple of uses
Confirmed. I've used the steel one over a dozen times already and it looks new. Just remember to crack the rear nut with the bike on the sidestand and someone (or two people) sitting on the bike. I tried once after I had already removed the front wheel, and I ended up having to make two trips to the tyre shop :p
 

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MY15 1200 S

Front
45 nm Caliper
10 nm pinch
63 nm nut
loosen pinch and load suspension
Re-torque pinch

Rear
230 nm nut
35 nm chain adjustment
 

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+1 or 2 on the steel rear nut socket. Also your going to need a massive breaker bar for that nut or a good 1/2" drive impact wrench to get it off and a large torque wrench to put it back on.
 

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230 nm. Sweet heavens. 169 foot pounds and change. I don't think my big torque wrench goes that high.

You'll need the 8-flute oil filter wrench; dealer had one for about $8. The rear nut sockets I've seen flip over for the size of the front end nut. I also loosely understand that you'll need a tool to help locate the front wheel while you re-place the front axle.

I may just sell the bike before I need tires...






JK.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks guys for all the information. I just hate to have to take the bike to the shop for every little thing. I am hopefully only going to be there for the 18000 mile service.
 

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Thanks guys for all the information. I just hate to have to take the bike to the shop for every little thing. I am hopefully only going to be there for the 18000 mile service.
Thats my plan as well! Redbrit why do you need a tool to locate the wheel while you replace the front axle? I just lift the wheel and get it close and put the axle in....? Am I missing something?
 

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You'll need the 8-flute oil filter wrench; dealer had one for about $8. The rear nut sockets I've seen flip over for the size of the front end nut. I also loosely understand that you'll need a tool to help locate the front wheel while you re-place the front axle.
I've never had a problem with using my ancient strap wrench to remove the filter. And as for those combo nuts, check the measurements. Some that I've seen have an older spec size for the front axle that's too small. Front is 32mm.

I've had the front wheel off a couple of times and didn't require any special tool to line up the axle. I guess it might be nice if the bike is way up in the air, but I've just had the bike on the centerstand and inch or two boost I need to get the wheel in position hasn't been difficult to manage just sitting in front of the bike.
 

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OP asked for 1260. The manual in the link does not cover this bike. I believe, it even does not have any info regarding DVT, which, in terms of valve adjustment, timing, required tools, is totally different from previous models.
I think, 1260 DIY owners are badly screwed up by Ducati. I asked the owner of Aprilia dealership (my good friend) if he could get me (not for free, I'm willing to pay for it!) Workshop Manual for 1260. He called several Ducati dealerships (he knows the owners) and was told that it's not possible. Ducati made workshop manuals accessible online only. Dealers can't save or print the manuals anymore. Also, Ducati refuses to sell the manuals to anyone. I think it may be considered as a violation of consumer rights. Essentially, Ducati forces you to service a bike at their dealerships only, which is against the law. How any other (independent) shop can work on a bike without having at least torque values and such? I wonder, if there is something that could be done about it?
I know that if you see something on a screen there is always a way to save/print it (screenshot, etc.). Is there someone on the forum who was access to Ducati computer and willing to get the manual for us? And you shouldn't feel bad about it, because what Ducati does is wrong! Even BMW sells workshop manuals on DVD. Yes, it's expensive, but still you can get it if you really need one.
 

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It doesn't specifically say 1260 or dvt, but doing the valves and belts is the same. The DVT doesn't change valve lash, only when the valves open and close relative to the crank. This type of work isn't for everyone, but it is for some. I plan to do it myself on the 1260 I'm buying.
 

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Have you researched belts changing on DVT? If yes, I can't understand how you don't realize that it's very different! You can't just mark belt position and remove the belt as on pre-DVT models. Camshaft gear can freely rotate on camshaft on DVT. You must remove a head cover and lock camshafts (not the gears!). Otherwise, you'll loose the timing!
I always do all work on my bikes myself, including valves job on pretty complex V4 engines. The only time a dealer sees my bike is when it's a warranty issue or the bike needs to be connected to a computer for a software updates. I'd really like to keep this the same with Ducati. But I need a f***ing service manual!!! I don't want to guess what are the correct torques on engine bolts.
It doesn't specifically say 1260 or dvt, but doing the valves and belts is the same. The DVT doesn't change valve lash, only when the valves open and close relative to the crank. This type of work isn't for everyone, but it is for some. I plan to do it myself on the 1260 I'm buying.
 

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Thats my plan as well! Redbrit why do you need a tool to locate the wheel while you replace the front axle? I just lift the wheel and get it close and put the axle in....? Am I missing something?


It’s because you are supposed to torque the axle nut, then load the suspension with the bike on the ground to settle the wheel/axle. After that you torque the pinch bolts.

If you don’t have the tool (Or make one yourself. Some people use a padlock.) you can’t torque the axle nut unless you tighten the pinch bolts first.


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It’s because you are supposed to torque the axle nut, then load the suspension with the bike on the ground to settle the wheel/axle. After that you torque the pinch bolts.

If you don’t have the tool (Or make one yourself. Some people use a padlock.) you can’t torque the axle nut unless you tighten the pinch bolts first.


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Hmmmm....been riding for 30 years and I just snug the pinch bolt enough to torque the axle nut, loosen the pinch bolt, bounce the front end a couple times and torque the pinch bolt. No need for special tools and never had a single issue of any kind. :wink2:>:)
 

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Hmmmm....been riding for 30 years and I just snug the pinch bolt enough to torque the axle nut, loosen the pinch bolt, bounce the front end a couple times and torque the pinch bolt. No need for special tools and never had a single issue of any kind. :wink2:>:)


Dude, your front wheel is going to fall off! Must. Have. Special. Tool.


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Dude, your front wheel is going to fall off! Must. Have. Special. Tool.


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It's strange. The service manual doesn't call for the use of the tool. It specifically has you...


  1. fit the axle
  2. thread on the main nut
  3. tighten the right side pinch bolts
  4. tighten the axle nut
  5. loosen the right side pinch bolts
  6. bounce the suspension
  7. tighten the pinch bolts.
 
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