Ducati.ms - The Ultimate Ducati Forum banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,379 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
We are just recovering from the bushfires, I think some are still going, although finally we have had some rain. Life was just getting back to normal, when two Friday nights ago it happened. Had just finished packing and sorting for our three day ride, was sitting on the couch when the wall behind me started shaking. At first I thought it was our neighbours testing out a new bed or something, but then the couch started to shake as did the whole house. I yelled out for himself who was upstairs, he didn't answer and eventually he came downstairs looking slightly shaken:eek:. It didn't last long, but my thought was "hope the house doesn't fall down and squash the bikes in the garage". One of our friends thought it was possums jumping onto his roof, big possums!!!

Today it happened again, was out walking at the time so didn't feel it.

For those of you who live in earthquake areas, I guess you are used to it. These are only baby quakes about 4.8, 4.9 - but we aren't accustomed to it. So feel free to share your experiences, where were you, what were you doing? Did you worry about your bike??

Seems Mother Nature is throwing everything at Australia, Floods, Fire and now Earthquakes!!
 

·
Senior Italophile
Joined
·
865 Posts
Earthquakes can be very unnerving. I had an experience back in the 97 when I was moving from Mammoth Lakes back to San Diego. Mammoth sits on a huge Caldera Called the Long Valley Caldera. We would get tons of tremors up there every day. The last days I lived there we got over 900 earthquakes in a day. Basically the ground did not stop shaking all day and all night. Living in So Cal is much quieter. We get more of the Wildland fires and earthquake mix.
 

·
Still needs a life.
Joined
·
12,529 Posts
The higher you are in a building, the worse it is due to the pendulum effect. I was on the tenth floor of our office building when Seattle had its last big quake a few years ago. The building swaying under me was quite unnerving.

I initially remembered the advice to stand under a door frame and started looking for one. Then I thought, "who am I kidding? I am on the tenth floor. If this building collapses, no door frame is going to save me."

No modern buildings suffered any damage, but some the brick fronts of some old buildings collapsed.

My main fear of an earthquake in Oz would be that it would shake up all those poisonous critters and send them out prowling. ;>)
 

·
Still needs a life.
Joined
·
12,529 Posts
Earthquakes can be very unnerving. I had an experience back in the 97 when I was moving from Mammoth Lakes back to San Diego. Mammoth sits on a huge Caldera Called the Long Valley Caldera. We would get tons of tremors up there every day. The last days I lived there we got over 900 earthquakes in a day. Basically the ground did not stop shaking all day and all night. Living in So Cal is much quieter. We get more of the Wildland fires and earthquake mix.
I lived in what was effectively a three story house when I attended the Defense Language Institute in Monterey. One night I noticed a hanging light was moving ever so slightly. I wondered if it was an earthquake.

It was an earthquake, but the epicenter was Mammoth Lake. I was amazed I could feel it as far away as Monterey. One night we had a local quake. The house was shaking and our bed was rolling. my wife slept through it.

I once felt a minor quake here in the Seattle area while I was standing outside my daughter's high schoool auditorium. I could feel the ground roll slightly. I wondered what was happening until I saw all the leaves and branches of some small trees shake in unison. There was no wind, so I knew it was an earthquake.

The very first quake I remember experiencing was when I was a kid living in SE Missouri (pronounced "Misery"). The New Madrid Fault has produced some of the largest quakes in the US. I have experienced earthquakes in three states: Missouri, California, and Washington.
 

·
Chilehead
Joined
·
6,980 Posts
Twenty years ago, I was in CA on business and there was a small one. I felt it, the locals didn't, and only acknowledged that I was right after seeing it on the news.

We get them here from time to time, but always petty minor. The strangest was one that sounded like there was a jet flying low, but there was none, just a mild quake.

Tom
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
792 Posts
As an almost lifelong resident of Northern California I've been through my share of earthquakes. Parkfield, one of the most seismically active places around, used to be a day's riding destination for us. http://earthquake.usgs.gov/research/parkfield/index.php The Parkfield cafe has great sandwiches. Check out the video of a 6.0: http://earthquake.usgs.gov/research/parkfield/2004.php

It's a good idea to be at least slightly prepared for earthquakes and other natural disasters; services and supplies are going to be pretty disrupted for a while when the 'Big One' comes. I think a measure of self-sufficiency is always a good idea anyway. If anyone is interested here's some reading about how to be prepared: http://www.sonoma-county.org/des/em_resource.htm#earthquake I'll be busy inspecting buildings and either granting or denying occupancy should the worst occur during my lifetime; I don't want to worry about where I'm going to find clean drinking water.

Bill, you're generally correct about more shaking as you get higher in a building, but that's actually not always true. Each building has its own frequency, as does each earthquake. If a building's frequency matches up to an earthquake's the shaking can actually be worse midway up. You're right to bring up that it's not only California or the West Coast that is at risk for earthquakes, there are huge faults that have been building up pressure for centuries just about everywhere. I'll take a regular diet of small shakers any day which mean the energy is being slowly released over time instead of all at once.

And for a little moto content: I always put my bike up on an extremely stable swingarm stand after every ride. If it gets knocked off that I have much bigger things to worry about. There would be a chance, in my old mostly foundationless freestanding garage, that it could get knocked off the sidestand by a moderately sized earthquake.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
11,256 Posts

·
Still needs a life.
Joined
·
12,529 Posts
There was a big earthquake in Santa Rosa, CA in the late 60's, before my parents moved there. Apparently the weather was unusually humid the day of the earthquake. After that, every time there was a humid day, people would start muttering something about "earthquake weather."
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,242 Posts
When I lived in SoCal during my college years I was sharing a condo place in the San Fernando Valley which was about 30 miles or so from school but it was a good price and right near Topanga Canyon and numberous other good riding roads. Anyway, I woke up one night and the world was moving around, the mirrored closet doors were rattling and stuff was falling off my shelves onto the floor. I'm from WI, I never felt an earthquake before. I looked down at my girlfriend sleeping beside me and shook her awake.

Me: Earthquake...
Her: God, it's not even a 6, go back to sleep...
Me: Oh.

And I went back to sleep.

It's funny thinking about it now. My mother in a panic to see if I was still alive. Apparently it was on the national news. By the time she called I had already shrugged it off.


Mom: Are you ok?! Are you alive?! It was all over the tv! ARE YOU OK??!!!

Me: God, mom, it's not even a 6...don't worry.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,379 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Its good to get the feedback, thanks everyone, sort of feel like we are waiting for something to happen and of course the media is telling us it COULD at any moment!! Pfft they should be content with a death toll just over 300 from the bush fires - (am very anti media at the moment). Hideous.:( We rode up through the roads that had opened two Saturday's ago. The landscape previously heavily forrested is now so open, with the trees still standing but no undergrowth - it is beautiful in a very bizarre and stark way. The Police at Mansfield welcomed us with open arms - no, not because we were misbehaving but because we were bringing business - they urged us to return to our favourite roads as soon as the rest were opened so that we could help the little local businesses with money.

Bill, our weather has been a little humid of late and strange things are happening - ie a shark spotted very close in at our local dog beach yesterday - have never heard of such a thing before. No matter, our dog hates swimming (she is supposedly a water dog - LOL) and I only like our pool. I am checking for other critters - particularly huntsman spiders (not poisonous, but big and hairy - yuck) which may decide to come out from wherever after a bit of shake up - but so far nothing. This is good I don't want anything more!!
 

·
Ducs fly. Apes fling poo
Joined
·
684 Posts
The 94 Northridge quake was a 6.7, but the ground acceleration was one of the highest ever instrumentally recorded in an urban area in North America. Seventy-two deaths were attributed to the earthquake, with more than 9,000 injured. In addition, the earthquake caused an estimated $20 billion in damage, making it one of the costliest natural disasters in U.S. history.

At the time my puppy kept looking at me like I was doing it & he wanted me to stop because it was disturbing his puppy dreams. The fault line actually ran under the Santa Monica mountains right into Santa Monica taking down St. Johns hospital and sections of the freeways nearby. Many of the aftershocks felt longer and stronger than the initial quake. As the aftershocks went on for many days a friend & myself discovered something interesting when we were on the phone. He would stop mid conversation to report a huge aftershock then 27 seconds later it would hit me 30 miles away. Also they put the entire Greater Los Angeles area on a dusk til dawn curfew for a week following the initial quake. 94 was a big year for Los angelenos. It was also the year of the OJ Simpson low speed chase after the discovery of the slaughter of his x-wife and her freind. And just recovering from the 92 LA riots. We also have huge fires and mudslides and stuff here but that's just part of the flavour of LA. During one quake, a few years ago, i was on my bike and thought to myself "sheesh! they really need to do something about this road. I don't remember it being so messed up last week." As I continued on my bouncy way I realized it was an aftershock only when I saw all the people flooding out of the buildings. Very recently there was a smallish quake epicenter under Venice, CA. . Because I was on top of it at the time it felt huge. I don't really get too fussed about quakes because really you just have to wait them out and if you survive you assess the damage. If not then all your worries are behind you anyway. If I sound a bit blasé about quakes it's only that I'm a 4th generation socal native. C'est la vie. At least we dont have huntsmen spiders or dropbears. ;)
 

·
Still needs a life.
Joined
·
12,529 Posts
After being in the last "big one" in Seattle, I decided that nowhere in a downtown area is safe if high rise buildings start to topple. Sometimes you are just in the wrong place at the wrong time and there is nothing you can do about it.

Getting back to Australia, I have said here before that Oz has more deadly critters per square kilometer of ocean and land than any other continent.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,379 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
I thought all Australians loved the ocean?
We do, doesn't mean we have to swim in it, although we live near the water it is a Bay, not an Ocean, perhaps it it was Ocean I may swim in it.:D

Floods. fires and earthquakes! Are you sure you wern't somehow transported to So. California? ;)
No, pretty sure am still in Melbourne, although I do own a SoCal Ducati cap.:D

The 94 Northridge quake was a 6.7, but the ground acceleration was one of the highest ever instrumentally recorded in an urban area in North America. Seventy-two deaths were attributed to the earthquake, with more than 9,000 injured. In addition, the earthquake caused an estimated $20 billion in damage, making it one of the costliest natural disasters in U.S. history.

At the time my puppy kept looking at me like I was doing it & he wanted me to stop because it was disturbing his puppy dreams. The fault line actually ran under the Santa Monica mountains right into Santa Monica taking down St. Johns hospital and sections of the freeways nearby. Many of the aftershocks felt longer and stronger than the initial quake. As the aftershocks went on for many days a friend & myself discovered something interesting when we were on the phone. He would stop mid conversation to report a huge aftershock then 27 seconds later it would hit me 30 miles away. Also they put the entire Greater Los Angeles area on a dusk til dawn curfew for a week following the initial quake. 94 was a big year for Los angelenos. It was also the year of the OJ Simpson low speed chase after the discovery of the slaughter of his x-wife and her freind. And just recovering from the 92 LA riots. We also have huge fires and mudslides and stuff here but that's just part of the flavour of LA. During one quake, a few years ago, i was on my bike and thought to myself "sheesh! they really need to do something about this road. I don't remember it being so messed up last week." As I continued on my bouncy way I realized it was an aftershock only when I saw all the people flooding out of the buildings. Very recently there was a smallish quake epicenter under Venice, CA. . Because I was on top of it at the time it felt huge. I don't really get too fussed about quakes because really you just have to wait them out and if you survive you assess the damage. If not then all your worries are behind you anyway. If I sound a bit blasé about quakes it's only that I'm a 4th generation socal native. C'est la vie. At least we dont have huntsmen spiders or dropbears. ;)
Gosh, its all been going on Anathema. Yes, I do remember the quakes that have occurred over your way in the 90's - it looked quite horrid and as I was sitting on our suddenly animated couch - visions of destruction did enter my mind.

Our puppy was quite animated on the night of the quake, but I paid no attention as we were PACKING bags and that always unsettles her. Even a laptop being put away into its bag causes a degree of fretting. The song "If you leave me, can I come to?" could have been written for her.

Our local roads are bumpy but nothing to with earthquakes, just poor maintenance.:(

You are lucky about not having Huntsmen, husband is out at a work-do, which will probably mean one will appear - they know when he is not at home!! As for dropbears, you need to live in areas with appropriate foliage - we don't have that kind of vegetation around here.;)
 

·
Still needs a life.
Joined
·
12,529 Posts
As for dropbears, you need to live in areas with appropriate foliage - we don't have that kind of vegetation around here.;)
I finally did a Wikipedia search on dropbears. I promise not to send one of our local Sasquach to Oz if you promise not to send one of your dropbears to the PNW.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,379 Posts
Discussion Starter #18
I finally did a Wikipedia search on dropbears. I promise not to send one of our local Sasquach to Oz if you promise not to send one of your dropbears to the PNW.
I think that is a promise I can comfortably keep.

As for your Sasquatch, I am sure I have seen something similar in our less salubrious public houses. They may well be our own home grown versions, but nonetheless scary, so you can keep yours at home.:D
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top