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Currently have a 2015 Diavel and thinking of trading. I love the power but after 200 my ass is killing me, even after two aftermarket seats. I test rode the supersport s and really liked it, but everyone is telling me I should get a multi because I am 6’3 with a 32 inseam. It seems every adventure bike I ever tried puts me high in the wind and I get really bad buffeting around my helmet compared to a naked like the Diavel.
 

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Currently have a 2015 Diavel and thinking of trading. I love the power but after 200 my ass is killing me, even after two aftermarket seats. I test rode the supersport s and really liked it, but everyone is telling me I should get a multi because I am 6’3 with a 32 inseam. It seems every adventure bike I ever tried puts me high in the wind and I get really bad buffeting around my helmet compared to a naked like the Diavel.
I went from a 2013 Diavel to a 2016 Multistrada. I wanted something better suited for the long-haul but still keep the sporty ride. I'm 5'9" with a 30" inseam. Like so many Multistrada owners I eventually bought an after-market windshield. I have not experienced any buffeting with the OEM windshield or the replacement which is a 7JURock.

I actually use the OEM windshield in the warmer weather and put the larger 7JURock windshield on in the winter to keep some of the cold wind off of me.

I've managed through all day rides on the OEM seat without much issue. It could be a little more comfortable but it wasn't horrible. At your height you could probably get a comfortable aftermarket seat and still flat foot at a stop. I cannot flatfoot with the oemc on the lowest setting.

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Currently have a 2015 Diavel and thinking of trading. I love the power but after 200 my ass is killing me, even after two aftermarket seats. I test rode the supersport s and really liked it, but everyone is telling me I should get a multi because I am 6’3 with a 32 inseam. It seems every adventure bike I ever tried puts me high in the wind and I get really bad buffeting around my helmet compared to a naked like the Diavel.
Hey Phxrider: I moved from an older SS to a multi a few months ago. I am 6'2" with 32 inseam as well. I have to say that the MS1100s is the tallest bike I've ever ridden, I can't put my feet down flat on the pavement at a stop. Interestingly, I don't seem to have much trouble scraping the pegs, though :cool:. I did have issues with wind blasting me mid-helmet; I added one of those "windscreen extenders" that clip onto your existing windshield, and I am 100% satisfied with the air flow now. I bought it off that auction site for $23 from China, can't say there's anything wrong with it and it appears reasonably well-built. There are a number of aftermarket windscreens available for the multi, particularly the 1200 DVT's. In the general scheme of things they're not that expensive, a few hundred bucks. As for the seat, the previous owner of my bike obviously had issues with both the stock seat and the DP seat because the bike came with both of those seats plus was fitted with a Corbin. So far I've found it reasonably comfortable... I haven't done any long trips yet but it's fine for a couple of hundred miles. I'm still getting used to not having my nuts jammed up against the tank that I had with the SS and every other previous sportbike I've owned, so pretty much any upright bike is a huge comfort improvement for me... take what I say with a grain of salt.

The 1200 multis will absolutely kick the crap out of the new SS power-wise. Just sayin'.
 

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I think you'll find that the stock seat does kind of tip you into the tank. Not sure if you've already ridden the Multi, but the thing that took the most getting used to for me was the travel in the suspension... it's not like a BMW which stays pretty stable on braking. Wind protection will probably be just fine for you if you're coming from the diavel. I keep the screen in the low setting.
 

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I went from a Diavel to a Multi DVT, being 6ft 2in with an inside leg of 33", its mega comfy, toured Europe with no issues although did swap the seat to the comfort seat as the standard one tipped me forward.

Go for it you won't regret it :grin2:
 

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I think you'll find that the stock seat does kind of tip you into the tank. Not sure if you've already ridden the Multi, but the thing that took the most getting used to for me was the travel in the suspension... it's not like a BMW which stays pretty stable on braking. Wind protection will probably be just fine for you if you're coming from the diavel. I keep the screen in the low setting.
Sounds like you either need stiffer springs or more compression damping or both, it should not dive excessively under hard braking. Suspension is fully adjustable, but the factory setup seems to be to set it up for a 170 lb rider in the front, and about 300 lbs in the rear for pillion riding. If you're substantially heavier, you'll want to change springs... the preload setting you need to get 35-50mm of sag up front should tell you when you're getting near the limit of the current springs. An hour spent on proper setup will pay dividends over many thousands of hours of riding.
 

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Sounds like you either need stiffer springs or more compression damping or both, it should not dive excessively under hard braking. Suspension is fully adjustable, but the factory setup seems to be to set it up for a 170 lb rider in the front, and about 300 lbs in the rear for pillion riding. If you're substantially heavier, you'll want to change springs... the preload setting you need to get 35-50mm of sag up front should tell you when you're getting near the limit of the current springs. An hour spent on proper setup will pay dividends over many thousands of hours of riding.
I just meant that if you're coming off a bike with less travel it takes some getting used to. I did have my suspension set up by guys who know what they are doing and it's quite confidence-inspiring in turns, etc. They did note that the rear spring was not meant for someone like me (180ish in gear and don't ride with pillion/bags) but they were still able to set it up to where it works for me (I'm not trying to shave milliseconds off my Sunday morning rides :smile2:
 

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If you can take the supersport for a longer ride (50-60 mi), you should be able to tell if it's actually an improvement on the diavel. Doubtful it has a more comfortable seat than Ducati's cruiser entry... but the sum of the parts might be greater than that of the Diavel. Have you tried the Tuono?
 

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They really are two completely different bikes. Personally, I don't like cruisers. You have zero wind protection and the riding position is more like sitting in a lounge chair (only less comfortable) with your arms out in front of you and all your weight on the seat (although the Diavel is not nearly as bad as most cruisers). The Multistrada sits you up higher giving you a commanding view of the road with a riding position that is more natural, meaning you can stand up on the pegs and sit straight up without feeling like you're putting weight on your wrists, but it is sporty enough to satisfy your need for speed and corner carving. The wind screen on the Multi is adequate but it does tend to create more wind roar in and around your helmet. It does a pretty good job of keeping wind off your body though and I don't really notice too much buffeting around my helmet even at freeway speeds. I have a Cee Bailey smoked screen that is 1" taller than stock and I'm pretty happy with it. I would say that earplugs are mandatory though.

I've ridden the Diavel and was quite surprised by how good it is. It has an excellent chassis and brakes and, of course, that fantastic motor. I just don't care for the cartoonish looks and the riding position. It is a beast though.

I would recommend riding a demo model, take it on a good long ride and see what you like about it and what you don't. I felt a bit awkward on the Multistrada the first time I rode one but after about 15 minutes I got comfortable with it and fell in love with how good it is. I didn't ride one again for a couple years and then got one overnight as a loaner and fell in love all over again. I traded my Monster in a few weeks later and haven't looked back. It's a tall bike and at 5'11" I can't flat foot mine but I can flat foot the new DVT Multi. They come with an adjustable seat and the demo models I've ridden always seem to be setup in the low position. I like the new DVT bikes but just don't see enough of an upgrade there to warrant trading in my 2014 Multi 1200 S for a newer one. Still, a new Pikes Peak might be tempting eventually. Trouble is, then I have to start the upgrades all over again. :grin2:

I have the comfort seat, Arrow exhaust, Pikes Peak Marchesini wheels and a few other upgrades on mine. I love this bike.
 

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I think you'll find that the stock seat does kind of tip you into the tank. Not sure if you've already ridden the Multi, but the thing that took the most getting used to for me was the travel in the suspension... it's not like a BMW which stays pretty stable on braking. Wind protection will probably be just fine for you if you're coming from the diavel. I keep the screen in the low setting.
I too found the pitching motion under braking/acceleration to be a little unsettling, but you get used to it very quickly. Still, I lowered mine and changed internals to stiffen up the suspension a bit. Every bike is going to pitch more than a BMW with its anti-dive front end, but that's what most riders complain about when first riding a BMW telelever. You get used to either-
 

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Currently have a 2015 Diavel and thinking of trading. I love the power but after 200 my ass is killing me, even after two aftermarket seats. I test rode the supersport s and really liked it, but everyone is telling me I should get a multi because I am 6’3 with a 32 inseam. It seems every adventure bike I ever tried puts me high in the wind and I get really bad buffeting around my helmet compared to a naked like the Diavel.
FWIW, I had a 2016 Multistrada 1200S and sold it for precisely this reason. Already have some hearing damage and despite riding with NRR33 ear plugs and trying several different windscreens, my ears were always ringing after any freeway time on the Multistrada. Aside from that, the Multistrada is a simply terrific bike! Really hated to part with mine, but the only way to prevent further hearing damage seemed to be to install a "shorty" windscreen, like the one from the Pikes Peak model. I already own a fantastic naked bike (Super Duke 1290) so it didn't make sense, for me, to turn the Multi into another one.

Just so you know: I replaced the Multistrada with a Supersport S. You might also want to consider the Hypermotard. Same motor as the Supersport in an even lighter package combined with even more suspension travel than the Multistrada. Given the condition of roads in my area, that sounds like a winning combination... if you can deal with the seat height.
 

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FWIW, I had a 2016 Multistrada 1200S and sold it for precisely this reason. Already have some hearing damage and despite riding with NRR33 ear plugs and trying several different windscreens, my ears were always ringing after any freeway time on the Multistrada. Aside from that, the Multistrada is a simply terrific bike! Really hated to part with mine, but the only way to prevent further hearing damage seemed to be to install a "shorty" windscreen, like the one from the Pikes Peak model. I already own a fantastic naked bike (Super Duke 1290) so it didn't make sense, for me, to turn the Multi into another one.

Just so you know: I replaced the Multistrada with a Supersport S. You might also want to consider the Hypermotard. Same motor as the Supersport in an even lighter package combined with even more suspension travel than the Multistrada. Given the condition of roads in my area, that sounds like a winning combination... if you can deal with the seat height.
How tall are you by chance ,6’3 here. Comfort wise how does the supersport compare to the mult? Do you get pain in your wrists from the ss riding position? How is the SS for long distance? I think the SS is a much better looking bike then the multi?
 

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FWIW, I had a 2016 Multistrada 1200S and sold it for precisely this reason. Already have some hearing damage and despite riding with NRR33 ear plugs and trying several different windscreens, my ears were always ringing after any freeway time on the Multistrada. Aside from that, the Multistrada is a simply terrific bike! Really hated to part with mine, but the only way to prevent further hearing damage seemed to be to install a "shorty" windscreen, like the one from the Pikes Peak model. I already own a fantastic naked bike (Super Duke 1290) so it didn't make sense, for me, to turn the Multi into another one.

Just so you know: I replaced the Multistrada with a Supersport S. You might also want to consider the Hypermotard. Same motor as the Supersport in an even lighter package combined with even more suspension travel than the Multistrada. Given the condition of roads in my area, that sounds like a winning combination... if you can deal with the seat height.
I rode my 2016 Pikes Peak for the first time in a while last Sunday and noticed something similar. Although the buffeting was fairly minimal, I could barely hear the bike on the freeway because of all the wind noise. I think my helmet doesn't help things so that's probably something I need to look into. (What winds up happening is that I usually wear earbuds or earplugs or riding another bike and wind up ignoring the issue)

Did you trade your 1200S for the SSS?
 

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I'm 5'11" and the touring screen on the 2014GT is almost perfect for me. At highway speeds with the screen in it's up-most position, I'm feeling just a little wind over the top of my helmet. It's so good that I am considering getting a BT setup for my helmet so I can listen to some tunes on my travels. If the screen was an inch taller it would just about be perfect. The only time I really feel any buffeting is if there is a reasonably stiff cross wind.
 

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FWIW, I had a 2016 Multistrada 1200S and sold it for precisely this reason. Already have some hearing damage and despite riding with NRR33 ear plugs and trying several different windscreens, my ears were always ringing after any freeway time on the Multistrada. Aside from that, the Multistrada is a simply terrific bike! Really hated to part with mine, but the only way to prevent further hearing damage seemed to be to install a "shorty" windscreen, like the one from the Pikes Peak model. I already own a fantastic naked bike (Super Duke 1290) so it didn't make sense, for me, to turn the Multi into another one.

Just so you know: I replaced the Multistrada with a Supersport S. You might also want to consider the Hypermotard. Same motor as the Supersport in an even lighter package combined with even more suspension travel than the Multistrada. Given the condition of roads in my area, that sounds like a winning combination... if you can deal with the seat height.
I always wear foam earplugs when I ride and I’ve had my Multi up over 100mph many times and have ridden thousands of freeway miles. If I’m wearing ear plugs, I hear very little wind roar. Without them, it is loud... very loud. Damage your hearing loud. But with ear plugs properly inserted in the ear canal there is no problem.
 

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I have found that the screen is best when the wind hits on the top of the shoulders. So your helmet is in the free air but the torso is protected. No wind noise or turbulence at all. I am using earplugs.
 

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I always wear foam earplugs when I ride and I’ve had my Multi up over 100mph many times and have ridden thousands of freeway miles. If I’m wearing ear plugs, I hear very little wind roar. Without them, it is loud... very loud. Damage your hearing loud. But with ear plugs properly inserted in the ear canal there is no problem.
I always wear NRR33 ear plugs, which I know how to insert properly, and I own one of the quietest helmets around (Shoei GT-Air). The stock windscreen, and all of the aftermarket screens I tried, created enough wind turbulence that I was always listening to a huge amount of wind roar when I rode my Multi (and the inevitable ringing in my ears afterwards). My naked Super Duke 1290, on the other hand, is blissfully quiet. So is the Supersport S. In short: it's not me, it's the bike. I have do doubt it would work much better with the Pikes Peak screen but, as I said earlier, I already own a fantastic naked bike.

Did you trade your 1200S for the SSS?
My dealer already had a bunch of used Multistradas sitting around, so they weren't interested in accepting another as a trade-in. I sold the bike outright.

How tall are you by chance ,6’3 here. Comfort wise how does the supersport compare to the mult? Do you get pain in your wrists from the ss riding position? How is the SS for long distance? I think the SS is a much better looking bike then the multi?
I'm 5'9" with a 32" inseam. Comfort-wise, I find the Supersport to be pretty close to the Multi. That said...

The pegs on the Supersport are a bit higher than the Multi, but not enough that I really notice it. After 2-3 hours on either bike, I do want to get off the bike to stretch my legs. The riding position on the Supersport definitely isn't as upright as the Multistrada. I don't notice any wrist pain, but I'm not particularly prone to it: even on my 2011 GSX-R750 I didn't have wrist problems. I'm more likely to notice tightness in my lower back, which the Supersport is slightly more likely to bring out than the Multi. The longest stint I've done on the Supersport without stopping was a bit over 3 hours. At that point I was ready for a break, but felt like I could have easily kept going for another few hours at least.

If you want to ride long distances, the Supersport probably isn't the best bike. It's comfortable enough, but the small annoyances would likely become even more annoying: mirrors that blur to the point of being useless at speeds above 40mph, the lack of cruise control, lack of an LED headlight, the complete inability to find neutral until the engine has been warmed up for an hour, etc. I think the Supersport S is a great "all around" bike, perhaps the best I've owned, but if I knew I was going to regularly rack up long-distance mileage I'd probably be looking at the Yamaha FJR1300 or BMW R1200RT. Or if I didn't already own the world's best naked bike, I'd consider buying a Multistrada 1200S, throwing the stock screen in the garbage, and installing the Pikes Peak screen. I have a friend who rides 20K+ miles/year and this is the setup he uses on his DVT Multi 1200S...
 

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I always wear NRR33 ear plugs, which I know how to insert properly, and I own one of the quietest helmets around (Shoei GT-Air). The stock windscreen, and all of the aftermarket screens I tried, created enough wind turbulence that I was always listening to a huge amount of wind roar when I rode my Multi (and the inevitable ringing in my ears afterwards). My naked Super Duke 1290, on the other hand, is blissfully quiet. So is the Supersport S. In short: it's not me, it's the bike. I have do doubt it would work much better with the Pikes Peak screen but, as I said earlier, I already own a fantastic naked bike.
I have the same helmet and a Cee Bailey +1 windscreen. I have mild tinnitus in my left ear but not from riding. My hearing is fine but without earplugs the wind roar is damaging. With them, it is not. Naked bikes are quieter but I’ve had my share of them and I still need earplugs on those bikes.

Short guys seem to like sportbikes and Harley’s but the Multi is the bike for me. It is a much more relaxed and comfortable riding position. KTMs are just plain ugly and their adventure bike is even worse. Plus, I hate the color orange.

I’ve put 12,000 miles on my Multistrada so you can take my word with a grain of salt but I would recommend a test ride to anyone interested in buying this or any bike to see if it suits them.

With earplugs, it is not too loud.
 
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