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Discussion Starter #1
Hello Folks,
Myself and a couple buddies are heading out to Death Valley at the end of November, this will be during the "new moon" so the Milky Way will be shinning bright. Any of you have a recommendation for an affordable, motor friendly hotel that has a decent restaurant?

Appreciate the info
 

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Cynthia's

We stayed there years ago when it was still a "true" Hostel (and was a bit rough... ok, it was a LOT rough, but for $25 a night who cares)... now it's a decently priced Hotel, it seems they've gone upscale (Prices up to $98 a night). Reviews are good online.

Not sure about eats... but about as close to the valley as you're going to get for under a hundred beans a night. In fact It's really IN Death Valley... just not in the 'Park' part.
 

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Hi John... I hope all is well. Sounds like that will be a fun time looking through your telescope :)

There are really only a few hotels IN Death Valley with a restaurant.

Furnace Creek - there is the cheaper side, Furnace Creek Inn (about $152/night) and the expensive side, Furnace Creek Ranch (about $432/night) - we brought the RV here so we didn't stay in the hotel. The food was decent, more of just a café style dinner place

Stovepipe Wells Village Hotel - approx. $154/night

Panamint Springs - they say you have to call the hotel as I don't see anything available, this must be a popular spot during the "new moon" timeframe
 

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Hello Folks,
Myself and a couple buddies are heading out to Death Valley at the end of November, this will be during the "new moon" so the Milky Way will be shinning bright. Any of you have a recommendation for an affordable, motor friendly hotel that has a decent restaurant?

Appreciate the info


I camped in Death Valley around Thanksgiving a few years back (OK, more than a few). It was seriously cold at night!
 

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We went in January... it was nice - cold at night but not stupid hot during the day.
 

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Discussion Starter #9 (Edited)
where do you want to stay? In the valley, or in Nevada?

If you want affordable, that may rule out DV.

There's always Beatty Nevada: https://www.motel6.com/en/motels.nv.beatty.4173.html
I was trying to find something for a friend who doesn't want to spend a lot, but I realize it's that time of year. I was thinking around $125 a night, your Beatty motel 6 certainly is affordable, but the last time I stayed in a Motel 6 was 30 years ago, they left a light on for me, but they left it on for every partying yahoo as well. That brings up the idea of staying outside the valley and just riding in the next day, we only have one full riding day, the other two are just to get there and get home on the third day. I suppose there is a loop of sorts you can take on a bike as I see it on the map posted for the Beatty motel 6. There is also the possibility of staying in Ridge Crest as well, outside the valley.

Another consideration is what route to take to get there from Sacramento. Originally I was thinking 395 from I/80, but that takes you in and out of the eastern Sierra Nevadas and you never know about the weather the last week of November. So now I'm thinking of taking I/80 and picking up 95 south out of Fallon, Nv., that way we will be in the desert with less chance of weird weather. I also heard there is no gas in the valley so filling up outside is recommended. One good thing about the motel 6 in Beatty, it's off of 95 and there are other motel/hotel options in Beatty too.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Cynthia's

We stayed there years ago when it was still a "true" Hostel (and was a bit rough... ok, it was a LOT rough, but for $25 a night who cares)... now it's a decently priced Hotel, it seems they've gone upscale (Prices up to $98 a night). Reviews are good online.

Not sure about eats... but about as close to the valley as you're going to get for under a hundred beans a night. In fact It's really IN Death Valley... just not in the 'Park' part.
Thanks, I'll check it out.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I camped in Death Valley around Thanksgiving a few years back (OK, more than a few). It was seriously cold at night!
I looked at the weather situation right off the bat. Went for the transition period, but knowing it would be desert cold at night, but no way did I want to go when it was hot. We won't be riding at night, but we will be prepared just in case.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
Hi John. Are your riding there?

Rick T.
Yes, four of us. BTW, is this the famous Rick T. our of Vacaville and retired now? If so you should join us on the ride.
 

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Death Valley acommodations

I started looking around and realized right away things were getting booked up in a hurry, some places were unavailable so I went ahead and booked the last three rooms at the El Portal Motel in Beatty. All are double rooms and they will call if there is a cancellation because we would prefer four rooms, but can get by with three. Not expecting much for $64 a night. Rooms were limited because they are finally going to remodel the place starting in October.
 

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I camped in Death Valley around Thanksgiving a few years back (OK, more than a few). It was seriously cold at night!
I used to go every spring and we would camp at the Furnace Creek campground.

If you should decide to camp out.

The hot setup is to time your arrival around noon.

The folks who are leaving that day will be leaving and you will have the best choices for where to camp.

If you arrive late in the day you get the scraps (or sometimes no camp space at all).

HTH.

(also, don't ride "down" to Titus Canyon, there's nothing to see over most of it and you'll probably be stuck behind some station wagon full of tourists. Park at the end (the valley end) and walk up and in, the part worth seeing is right at the end of the 20+ miles of the road).
 

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I have to disagree about Titus Canyon, we have explored a great deal of the area and always enjoyed it. We go in the afternoon around 3 or 4pm so maybe after all of the tourist I suppose.

 

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I have to disagree about Titus Canyon, we have explored a great deal of the area and always enjoyed it. We go in the afternoon around 3 or 4pm so maybe after all of the tourist I suppose.

On those bikes, things would probably be different but on a touring bike with panniers and the lot, it's just a fairly slow slog to get to the "big draw" at the end.

Most people (including myself) thought DV was just a quickie look-see but it is actually a very interesting part of the world. It takes a while to tune into the alluvial fans and the stratification and that means sitting there and just looking.

So I tend to recommend people minimize the travel and just go for as many high spots as possible as I have been in DV over 15 days (3-4 trips) and there is just more and more to see and learn about.

One of the things that was a slight bummer was that I was not initially aware of DV's position in the history of the US.

It was actually the DOTCOM boom at the turn of the century. Really interesting to know that as you look around the park.

This book will fill you in and make any trip to DV much more enjoyable

https://www.amazon.com/Death-Valley-Amargosa-Land-Illusion/dp/0520063562/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1472940724&sr=8-1&keywords=death+valley+and+the+amargosa+a+land+of+illusion

Since many people only get to DV once, a good example of why I think aiming for the biggest experience per time spend is important -

if you get up early and ride back out of the park to the west and then down WildRose canyon you can get to the road to Aguereberry Point. It's a dirt road out to the edge of the Panamint range and from there you can see more of the valley in one view than from anywhere else.

The main reason to go early is that you would want to try and get there when there is no one else around - because -

there is almost no vegetation and no birds and no wind (early in the morning) and it will be absolutely the quietest place you have ever been.

Just dead silent.

Pretty eerie but I was just dumbfounded at what happens when your body is not receiving any noise (it goes kinda wacko).

Whenever I think of getting back to DV top on my list is another visit to Aguereberry Point.

On a map, it looks like too long a ride but once you get there you realize it has been worth it.

https://www.google.com/search?q=Aguereberry+Point&num=20&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjy09vcnfTOAhVC5WMKHfBVDmAQ_AUICSgC&biw=1182&bih=689

HTH.

M./
 
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