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Discussion Starter #1
I have been looking into the 800ss in order to start experiencing track days. While the track will not be the only place for this bike, I was wondering about the daily friendliness of the SS geometry. While clearly not an upright bike like the Multistrada or even the Monster, can it be comfortable for a rider of 5'9" while putting some miles on?

Would you pass along some of your experiences in terms of miles consumed in a day and how comfortable you were? Do you use it as a daily commuter? Recommendations.

Thanks in advance
 

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I have a newer SS, no problems commuting on it stock or doing 300+ miles in a day. If you have weak abs/back, then get different angled bars as your weight will be in your wrists. Also, rotate the controls down so you don't have to rotate your wrists up/back to squeeze the levers.
 

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I have a newer SS, no problems commuting on it stock or doing 300+ miles in a day. If you have weak abs/back, then get different angled bars as your weight will be in your wrists. Also, rotate the controls down so you don't have to rotate your wrists up/back to squeeze the levers.
Problem is the standard bars allow very little rotation of the controls. I'd recommend aftermarket bars and levers even if you have manly abs and back like this bloke!
 

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Problem is the standard bars allow very little rotation of the controls. I'd recommend aftermarket bars and levers even if you have manly abs and back like this bloke!
This is true I have manly 6-pack abs and the bars have limited rotational adjustment.

The FbF clip-ons have a softer angle and they allow for bars to insert into the clip-on assembly vs being welded, so that may give more range of adjustment.

Or you could commute to work in full tuck mode.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
in no hurry to get to work any faster...

the CycleCats look like they can be adjusted but the HeliBars have more rise.

Personally, I decided to forgo the 6-pack and build upon my winter kegger. If I keep this up I may need to go with ape-hangers.
 

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The SS is no less comfortable than any other pure sports bike, and more comfortable than many cutting edge 600's and 1000's. The above mods are only going to make the bike even more comfy.

If you are going to do comfort mods, don't forget a Sargent seat! When your butt gets sore the fun quickly fades. The Sargent seat will greatly increase the number of miles you can put on before your butt starts to complain. Oh, and they look awesome, too! :cool:
 

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The SS is no less comfortable than any other pure sports bike, and more comfortable than many cutting edge 600's and 1000's. The above mods are only going to make the bike even more comfy.
I'd say the SS is on par w/ current bikes for ergonomics although they feel built for someone taller than the 5'8 rider the japanese bikes have designed in.

For comfort and better control: lean further forwards. You could also loosen and adjust the angle of the clip-ons and levers to suit you.
 

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in no hurry to get to work any faster...

the CycleCats look like they can be adjusted but the HeliBars have more rise.

Personally, I decided to forgo the 6-pack and build upon my winter kegger. If I keep this up I may need to go with ape-hangers.
Yeah...+1 on the "manly" 6 pack...any bets he shaves his chest too?

Anyway, although the HeliBars do have more rise, it can't be used because the fairing gets in the way. In addition, the CycleCats are much higher quality and allow for almost infinite angle adjustment, and that is much more crucial to wrist comfort in my opinion.

I hate to disagree with our friend with the male stripper abs, but the discomfort comes from the inability to adjust the angle of the bars and levers, not the weight placed on the wrists. EVERYONE is built differently, so adjustability is key. My bars now are no higher than standard, but the angle of them sure is, and I can ride for hours now with no discomfort whatsoever.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I'd say the SS is on par w/ current bikes for ergonomics although they feel built for someone taller than the 5'8 rider the japanese bikes have designed in.

Coming in between 5'8" and 5'9", there may be hope for me...

I sat on a ST3 a few months back and felt a bit stretched out. A stock 800ss did not feel as stretched but it could be my imagination and wishful dreaming.

Thanks for all the comments. I have been torn as to what direction I should go. Monster, SS or another Multistrada. I have had two of the later and after a crash due to a DWI driver, it might be time to try something else. The newer superbikes are not an option at this point due to cost - 749 and 999 for the same reason.

I loved the Multi for long trip capabilities (many 700+ days in the saddle) but also wanted to ride something a bit sportier whichs get me back to to my bicycle racing roots, tucked-in and in a slip stream.

While I have interest in track time, using the 800ss for longer trips would be cool (from San Francisco to LA, or up to Humboldt, etc.) and commuting too. While pannier selection and carrying capacity is limited, I have a feeling that it would be a great choice until a newer Multi design is available in version 2.0.

Thanks again and happy holidays.
 

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I'm 5'9" on a good day.

My SS is the smallest of my bikes. As you mentioned, the ST is more streched out. The SS is also much lighter.

Ergonomics really depend on the individual. Unlike what many others have posted, I have gone for LOWER bars on my SS and ST2, and have rotated the controls UPWARD on all of my bikes, which has virtually eleminated my CTS problems.

Beyond that, it sucks in town. Both my LeMans and 999 have much better manners in town than my SS I have done 300 mile days on alpine and Tuscan roads with no problems, as well as a couple 400 mile trips of superslab (back when I was dating a fashion designer living in France).

If I could only keep one bike, it would be a toss up between the LeMans and the SS (or maybe the 999 if I could figure out a way to carry luggage onm it).

Tom
 

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My SS is very friendly every day, even says good morning and good night. :)

Sorry couldn't resist. My experience is that it is quite fine until you get stuck in bumper to bumper traffic which happens to me all of the time. Then, just like most sport bikes I am not very pleased with the ergos.

That is one of the reasons she is going on the old selling block soon unfortunately. Great bike but not for the type of riding I find 90% of my riding turning out to be.
 

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I hate to disagree with our friend with the male stripper abs, but the discomfort comes from the inability to adjust the angle of the bars and levers, not the weight placed on the wrists. EVERYONE is built differently, so adjustability is key. My bars now are no higher than standard, but the angle of them sure is, and I can ride for hours now with no discomfort whatsoever.
Just like you said, "EVERYONE is built differently". For you, the pain/discomfort comes from the slope of the bars, for others, the pressure on the wrists.

I ride road bicycles a lot, so there is a lot of pressure on my wrists/hands/ulnar nerve with the mileage I put in. Any reprieve from pressure/vibration is good for me. A slightly stronger core (abs, back) can really take the pressure off you hands and allow one to be light on the controls, which is a good thing. Using your core muscles to support your weight burns more calories throughout the ride, which means I can still have that side of bacon and fit into the leathers next week.

Higher bars and a slightly less sloped/droopy set-up would help too, but I haven't gotten that far yet. I figure I can do some body work first and see if that resolves any issues, then spend money on equipment second.

As far as position goes, keeping your elbows close to the tank helps out with the sloping handlebars, and living in CA is a benefit as it's not illegal to split/share lanes.
 

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That is one of the reasons she is going on the old selling block soon unfortunately. Great bike but not for the type of riding I find 90% of my riding turning out to be.
Reluctantly, I have to agree with you. I find myself making more and more excuses to ride my wife's new Bonnie and leave Lola in the garage. I will never sell her though, not ever. She is so red and shiny and beautiful!
 

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Chilehead
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Great bike but not for the type of riding I find 90% of my riding turning out to be.
The type of riding also is a factor in which ergos are best. I walk to work, and live in the Alps, so 90% of my riding is riding back roads with a 50MPH speed limit that's hard to exceed most of the time due to the highly technical nature of the road, with no traffic, stop signs, etc. Probably also a factor in why I never get more than 3k miles on tires.

Tom
 

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I don't think many people will feel sorry for you on this one Tom :)


The type of riding also is a factor in which ergos are best. I walk to work, and live in the Alps, so 90% of my riding is riding back roads with a 50MPH speed limit that's hard to exceed most of the time due to the highly technical nature of the road, with no traffic, stop signs, etc. Probably also a factor in why I never get more than 3k miles on tires.

Tom
 

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Track use and spirited Sunday romps would be fine on this bike. But I can think of at least 20 different bikes I'd rather be stuck in traffic on while commuting. For high mileage, sport touring days, the SS would have been one of my top choices, except for the puny little gas tank. I need to cover at least 200 miles between fill-ups, otherwise it's out of contention.

Just my
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Over the summer I took a work-break and went out on the road for 42 days with my Multi. While my top days were close to 800 miles, I would stop at a maximum every 120-150 to check maps, get something to eat and meet the locals. Even though I knew I could go to about 180, the nagging fuel light would make me second guess myself. :confused:

I suspect the 800ss will see breaks more often. Frankly at this point in my life (which I am glad to still have after that damn DWI driver) I might stop at every gas station I see.

Thanks for all the opinions, please keep them coming and have a Happy, Safe Holiday.

viva la supersport
 
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