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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay, I know that there have been quite a few threads and discussions regarding the pros and cons of coring the stock cans on the Supersports, but I figured I'd post some info regarding the process for those of you that may be considering it.

The bike is a 1997 900SS that I purchased in March. It has about 13k miles on the clock, and is pretty much stock except for some odds and ends here and there (clutch/controls/etc). Everything engine/fuel related is all completely stock and untouched, so I had a good starting point when measuring any performance gains/losses after the mod.

I did quite a bit of research on the coring process, and knew there were a few different routes I could take. The most noteworthy guide I found was on the DucatiSuite site:
Ducati Suite- Superbike Muffler Modifications
This write-up can be considered a partial core, considering only the very last baffle is removed. Definitely a better sound, but apparently performance gains were minor.

Another good reference was this from the Monster forums:
my exhaust coring write up with photos
This is more of a full core, because the entire length of baffling is removed, and replaced with new perforated tubing. From the comments it seemed the sound coming from this set-up was top notch, and with a little bit of carb work/tuning, performance gains were definitely noticeable. I knew after reading this write-up that it was the way to go.

So, I gathered up the courage to destroy a set of mint stock Ducati cans, and got to work. But, I knew there would be a number of tools that i would need to get the job done.

1. Someone who knows how to weld. This is a must. Any guy that has more than two fingers should be able to get the work done. The only hard part here is welding thin stainless steel, since it burns through pretty easy, apparently.
2. A Cut off tool. NOT A DREMEL.
3. A dremel, lol. (It's good for some of the trimming/small grinding needed to finish the job.
4. Pretty much every other tool for basic metal work. Drills, punches, hammers, pliers, etc.
5. Some special shop materials like Hi Temp silicone, anti-seize thread compound, etc.

Continued below...
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
So, after removing the pipe from the bike, I consulted the threads mentioned above and removed the rivets holding the end caps to the pipe sleeve. The Dremel came in pretty useful here. After getting the caps off, I then tapped the pipe internals out of the muffler sleeve, basically just following the same directions. You want to get to this point: (sorry about the blur)



Now that I knew what the inside looked like, I drew up some very basic plans to show what was rollin around in the ol' melon.



So, I used my 4" cutting tool and proceeded to cut every last piece of baffling from each of the pipes, making sure to leave the strip that connects the collector plate to the end plate that has the stock mounting nuts on it. This was important, because I wanted everything to bolt back up the way it came off.

After cutting, this is what came out:



I couldn't believe how many twists and turns the exhaust gasses have to go through in order to get out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Now that I had everything removed, I had to purchase some perforated tube. I didn't know exactly how much I needed until I had everything apart and could measure. Each pipe needed about 15" of tube, so I went ahead and ordered one 30" length of 1-1/2" stainless perforated pipe from here:

PERFORATED STAINLESS TUBING - 1-1/2" O.D. by LA Choppers - Baron Custom Accessories

I went with stainless due to the high moisture environment, and 1-1/2" because that is roughly the same size as the section of stock collector pipe still in the muffler. I brought the pipes and new tubing to a welder at work, and he made quick work of it. This was the result:

Collector side:



End piece side:



Entire length



Again, sorry about the blur in the photos. I have undiagnosed earthquake arms. (It's hereditary)
So after the perforated pipe was welded in place and straight (we made sure of this my constantly fitting the sleeve during the welding process to make sure it lined up), I decided to add some additional bracing the cans. I bought 3 feet of standard steel hardware bracing and had that welded to that span of the stock pipe that we intentionally left in that has the mounting nuts, and then to each cap. See the pic below:



This was just to brace the entire can a little better, especially at the point where it physically hangs from the passenger pegs.

Continued below..
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Now that everything was welded and braced correctly, I decided to make a minor, but very worthwhile adjustment to how the mufflers are assembled. Remember those rivets that we took off to begin the whole process? Well, removing those things sucked. They were made out of stainless steel and were impossible to drill out. Apparently, stainless steal hardens when you try to drill it. Knowing I never wanted to do that again, I decided to weld (er.. have my buddy weld) some stainless 5mm nuts to the inside of the rear end piece. This would allow me to use 5mm socket head screws in place of rivets, making the mufflers totally serviceable in the future.



You can't see them all that well due to the expert welding job (ahem) but I assure you, they're there. Here's how it looks from the other side, with a screw threaded in:



The final step before reassembly was purchasing fiberglass packing. I bought 4 sheets (2 per pipe) here:

Amazon.com: Moose Racing Fiberglass Muffler Packing - --/--: Automotive

and they fit perfectly. Be sure to WEAR A LONG SLEEVE SHIRT AND GLOVES AND WRAP YOUR FACE IN SERAN WRAP. This stuff is ruthless. I wouldn't wish a buttcrack of this stuff on my worst enemy. Getting the fiberglass to stay put was a little tricky, so I used some masking tape to hold it tight. I figured it would burn off eventually and not cause any harm to anything.



Kinda looks like I taped a dead ferret to my exhaust huh?
I then made sure to seal the end caps of the pipes with some high temp silicone, so I wouldn't be shedding strands of fiberglass along the interstate.



and



Next, I slid the outside pipe sleeve onto the assembly, and added some more silicone to the end piece:



..and buttoned everything up.



It's important to add some thread anti-seize to these end screws, since the repeated heating and cooling in the area can cause some serious problems on the threads.

Continued..
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
So how does it sound? I can't describe it, nor can any digital camera audio recording capture it. It just wouldn't do it justice. It's mellow at idle, throaty at 4k, and utterly violent and unrelenting at red line. Here's a very quick clip of the exhaust:


Like I said, the vid does not do it justice. I know it's a little hard comparing exhaust sounds, but I can honestly say without a doubt that it is a VAST improvement. Absolutely no "raspiness" at higher rpms. As for comparing it to top-dollar Termi systems, I would say that the for the price trade off, you're coming pretty close. (Total for the entire exhaust mod was about 100 bucks, and took a total of 6 hours or so.) Obviously, the carbon set ups look a lot better, but for now, I'm pretty happy.

Performance wise I'm not yet sure. The mod has definitely leaned up my air/fuel mixture, and I've had a couple pops and spits on deceleration since the mod. I know FCRs would be the next logical step, but for the time being I plan on purchasing a factory pro kit with new emulsion tubes. (it's probably due, anyways.) I have all winter to tinker with that. Another issue - at the same time I was performing this exhaust mod, I also installed a new chain and 39T rear sprocket, so really gauging the performance gains as a result of the exhaust mod alone has been a bit difficult.

All in all, it was a fun experience, and totally worth the time and money spent.
 

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I've had cored OEM cans on my 1995 900 since I purchased a year ago and have loved them. Loud, but a bit sputtery. This weekend I installed carbon fiber Ducati Performance high pipes and it sounds amazing. Kept the deep growl and thunder but w/o the sputtering...and they look great.



original:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I've had cored OEM cans on my 1995 900 since I purchased a year ago and have loved them. Loud, but a bit sputtery. This weekend I installed carbon fiber Ducati Performance high pipes and it sounds amazing. Kept the deep growl and thunder but w/o the sputtering...and they look great.
You know what? I saw your thread while I was in the middle of the project and liked your pipes so much, I immediately started searching the interwebs for similar pipes. I couldn't find them anywhere..
 

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Wow, great write-up on the job. You wouldn't believe how many text-only write-ups I find that leave you wondering. I'd definitely use you instructions however I've already cored mine, not in the same manner as but just as effective.

You know what? I saw your thread while I was in the middle of the project and liked your pipes so much, I immediately started searching the interwebs for similar pipes. I couldn't find them anywhere..
BWAHAHAHAHHAHA! I started searching for the same pipes! For that price if you weren't going to pick them up I would have!

Cheers,
C
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
BWAHAHAHAHHAHA! I started searching for the same pipes! For that price if you weren't going to pick them up I would have!

Cheers,
C
I cracked up after reading that. I remember a set for the 91-98 SS showing up on ebay about six months ago. The guy titled the listing "Unobtanium DP Pipes" or something like that.
 

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Where can I find a set of those pipes? Carbon or aluminum. Website please. I've got some what I guess are Cobras on mine. I really like the looks of carbon. Haven't seen many black SS's. VERY nice. Always thought Ducs and Ferraris should be red, but black is beautiful, baby!
 

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Great thread, punch455. Thanks!

Where can I find a set of those pipes? Carbon or aluminum. Website please. I've got some what I guess are Cobras on mine. I really like the looks of carbon. Haven't seen many black SS's. VERY nice. Always thought Ducs and Ferraris should be red, but black is beautiful, baby!
I wish I still had the Termis from my first 900SL! haven't replaced the pipes on my SP yet, but I've been searching for a few months. Here are some websites I've found to get you started:

www.motowheels.com...Supersport%20Exhaust&collection

www.flyncycle.com/900SS_Exhaust_s


www.jcmotors.com...dd-dual-slip-on
 
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