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Discussion Starter #1
So i was caught in a downpour today on the 996 for about 20 mins. Is there anything I should be concerned about with the bike afterwards? Intaking water? Open clutch cover? things of that nature?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
well a good cleaning is in order since 1/4 of the trip was over the Pineda Causeway in sideways wind...... ... saltwater!
 

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The "WD" in WD-40 stands for water displacing. People use WD-40 for all kinds of things that it was not intended for, but displacing water is it's primary purpose. I wouldn't hit your clutch plates with it, but all the wiring connectors and pivots, bearings (the steering head especially) are all fair game.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I was most concerned with the intake sucking water and soaking the air filter.. I could just picture the water going in directly..
 

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Air filters will dry. Put WD40 or grease in all screws you see, do that even if you never see any drop. Your clutch? Don't worry: warm as hell and spinning, water doesn't stay too long in this place.
996 fairing prevents from a too important water intrusion near your engine.
So, don't worry, be happy...clean the bike: rain will give you a good reason for detailing.
 

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Waterproofing Your Ducati

WD-40 has no place in electrical connectors or components. WD-40 is composed of 80% Stoddard Solvent (that is similar to paraffin), 20% light lubricating oil, and a bit of fragrance. So, I advise against using WD-40 in any part of an electrical system because it leaves an oil residue.

On a wet bike that won’t start, I recommend first using a leaf blower to dry everything out and let it sit in the sun for awhile. It'll start eventually. Then waterproof it.

Waterproofing Your Ducati

Motorcycle electrical systems are more exposed to the elements than cars so it’s important to keep the system sealed against water infusion to avoid corrosion of the electrical connections.

In particular, the electrical connection between the alternator and the regulator carries a very high current, so corrosion there will lead to overheating the connector and adjacent wiring. I recommend eliminating this connector entirely using solder and shrink-tube insulation.

Another problem area is the rubber boot on the electrical connection to the starter motor. It leaks, collects water and corrodes the connection. Here, you need to clean the connection and then seal it watertight with silicon sealant.

Every instrumentation, power and ground connection on the bike is a potential problem. So the best approach is to prevent water from reaching the connections whenever possible and to reduce electrical resistance at each connection.

Care should be taken to avoid forcing water into the connections so set your wash hose nozzle on spray (not stream) and avoid using the high pressure commercial wash/steam systems on your bike.

The connectors are designed to be waterproof, but over time seals will harden and eventually moisture will get in. Some owners make it a practice to using dielectric (non-conducting) grease to keep water out of connectors that don’t get hot enough to cause the grease to liquify.

For connectors that stay cool enough to let the dialectric grease to remain thick, use it to seal the male-female seam so as to prevent water from entering the connector. Don’t put it on the connecting pins themselves. Use in connectors that get hot runs the risk of the grease liquifying and getting on the pin surfaces.

Using dielectric grease on connector pins can be a source of unwanted high resistance. Ferrari used to put dielectric grease inside all of their engine connectors (that will see water) but they eventually found out that it caused problems. They issued a service bulletin that advised cleaning out all of the grease and to use instead a contact enhancing product called Stabilant 22.

http://www.stabilant.com/appnt20h.htm

When applied to an electrical connection Stabilant 22 becomes conductive. The manufacturer claims that it is as good as a soldered joint.

VW, Porsche, BMW and Ferrari all recommend the use of Stabilant 22 on electrical connectors. You can buy it at your local VW parts department. Don't be shocked at the price, a 5ml tube is around $40.

A 15 ml bottle of Stabilant 22 costs $61 a NAPA stores. It's packaged under NAPA's Echlin brand, so when specifying the part number the "line" is ECH and the part number is CE1.

There are some other specialty products that try to address the connector protectant issue. Deoxit for example:

http://shopping.netledger.com/s.nl/c.ACCT113328/category.94/it.A/id.1610/.f;jsessionid=fcea1546a36c408db100f4c50d0dcc64

Another is Boeshield T-9

Use an electrical contact cleaner to remove any grease and oil that is causing conductivity problems. Sticky relays should just be replaced because in the long run they’ll probably fail when you least want them to.

For the starter motor connection, clean and dry properly. Coat with liquid electrical tape, be patient and put on five or six coats, allowing each to dry.

Also, 3M Scotchkote works well for sealing electrical connections. Inexpensive and easy to find (Home Depot or Electrical Supply houses).
 

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Give it a good wash to get the crap out of it other than that just ride the damn thing, the engine heat will dry it out. It's a motorcycle.
 

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Reminds me of the time which I took my Duc to the dealers and got caught in the rain on my way there. And the first greeting which came out of the technician’s mouth was, “you ride in the rain? Do you know how many things can go wrong”? And honestly I did not know as I used to commute 45 miles each way everyday on my Honda RC51 and I would ride even when it rained and the bike ran fine with no issues electrical or otherwise.
 

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last time I got stuck in the rain, I had:

Neutral lights failed to go off.
Starter would not engage

I had to remove all the connector, and dry it one at the time.


Ducati is not a Hondah man..
 

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I ride in the pissing down rain all the time, just give it a good wash & clean. Dont become another duke owner that shits himself because of scaremongering.

Its a bloody bike , the same as any other bike, look after it & it will look after you...
 

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I ride in the pissing down rain all the time, just give it a good wash & clean. Dont become another duke owner that shits himself because of scaremongering.

Its a bloody bike , the same as any other bike, look after it & it will look after you...
+1

It's just a freaking bike. It's not like the hand of god reached down and pissed on it or something.

So what, it gets wet, it rains. Wipe it off, hop back on it, and ride it.

:)

I've commuted on my 900SS for close to 37k miles as well as tracked it.

My husband commuted on his S4R for 27k miles, up until he totaled it at the track last month.

Rain or shine...everything but ice on the roads.
 
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