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I have an 888 with a slipping clutch. I also have a 1098 Streetfighter that I recently put a slipper clutch in. My plan was to take the clutch plates and put them in the 888.

The service manual for the 888 lists the thickness of the base plates but just tells me that there are to be 6 frictions and 6 steels after that with no thickness or stack height listed. I could not find stack height in the manual, so I searched this forum and thanks to another great post by Shazam, told me that I needed 38 +/- 2mm. That made perfect sense as the old clutch had thicker steels in it and was below 36mm.

So when I look at the clutch parts for the SF I see that there are 7 frictions and steels and the stack height measures just under 41mm. Unfortunately I do not have a manual for the Streetfighter, but I just always assumed they were the same. I ended up removing one friction and one steel and using the thicker steels from the old clutch to get just over 38mm total stack height. Works perfect.

So I guess my question is, are the aluminum friction plates the cause of the differnet stack height spec. or just model to model?

And did I make a mistake by running one less set of plates? I understand the steel clutch basket may wear out the frictions sooner, but that doesn't really concern me.

By the way, the clutch works great now. I thought the old girl was just getting tired, but this clutch job really woke her up. What a difference in performance. It was long past due. :yeah:
 

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Premium Member
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3,111 Posts
IDK, you would think a dry clutch is a dry clutch is a dry clutch.

I would think they should all have the same stack hgt, and number of plates.

The S4 uses 6 friction and 6 driven , with one of the plates being convex, and 1 at 3mm
 
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