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I was actually thinking of replacing mine but I was under the impression that the dry clutch springs are different than the wet clutch ones?

If so, do you know what springs I can get?


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Here's how much springs can shrink:

The left is a new stainless steel one from EVR, the right side is original OEM after ~15K miles.
The OEM springs didn't shrink, the stainless springs are fabricated longer to exert the same force on the pressure plate when compressed to the same height as the OEM springs. Stainless steel has less-stiff material properties (esp. in torsion and tensile strength) than alloy steel, so a replacement stainless spring needs to be compressed more than an OEM alloy spring to exert the same force.
 

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The OEM springs didn't shrink, the stainless springs are fabricated longer to exert the same force on the pressure plate when compressed to the same height as the OEM springs. Stainless steel has less-stiff material properties (esp. in torsion and tensile strength) than alloy steel, so a replacement stainless spring needs to be compressed more than an OEM alloy spring to exert the same force.
Yes but over time the springs compress to the point of need replacing, no? I’m at about 8,500 miles and as far as I know the springs were never replaced. Ditto for the plates.

Maybe it’s time..


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Yes but over time the springs compress to the point of need replacing, no? I’m at about 8,500 miles and as far as I know the springs were never replaced. Ditto for the plates.
No there's no need to replace the clutch springs except for (stainless) cosmetic reasons. The springs will last for the life of the bike. The clutch plates need replacement when their thickness decreases to the point where the overall clutch pack height reduction reduces spring preload and the clutch slips.
 

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No there's no need to replace the clutch springs except for (stainless) cosmetic reasons. The springs will last for the life of the bike. The clutch plates need replacement when their thickness decreases to the point where the overall clutch pack height reduction reduces spring preload and the clutch slips.
Gotcha, so the only thing left to do is get that 32mm slave cylinder.


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When installing the Oberon I did not use the extra metal rod bit as the instructions said it was only needed for older bikes. Is this what you’re talking about?
You only need that extra 10mm length if you're working with a bike older than MY 2000. Anything newer, the 10mm extension should not be required. (Per EVR slave instructions)

If you have an after market master, the stock slave will feel better than an aftermarket slave. If you have an aftermarket slave, the stock master will work better.

I went full on EVR 48 tooth on my 996 with the stock master and it's like buttah. I'll use that combination again for my next build...though my current 900SS build came with an aftermarket slave that I'll probably just reuse....sean
 
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