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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have read a few different ways to pack the clutch plates on my 2000 996.
By the way it is an aluminum basket and plates (if that makes a difference).
Where does the 1.5 mm plate go :confused:
Starting with the first plate put into the basket....
1st way....
1.5 mm plate (dot facing out)
2.0 mm plate
3.0 mm friction
and so on...
2nd way....
2.0 mm plate
2.0 mm plate
3.0 mm friction
1.5 mm plate
3.0 mm friction
and so on...

Any idea which way is correct or what is the difference with placement of th 1.5mm plate :confused:
 

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If you have a 996 (not 996-S, 996-SPS) the 2nd way is correct (according to the service manual). The 996-S and SPS have totally different setup with different thickness driven plates and two spring plates.

-Fariborz
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
what will happen if they are installed the first way ???
 

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my996duc1 said:
what will happen if they are installed the first way ???
I have tried all sorts of different ways. ON my Xerox with slipper I have the Curved one first with 3 steels and then friction, steel, friction and so on. Most of my issues have been with stack height, I really have not figured out what the curved plate is really for. Anyone have a good explanation what the curved plate is for? and why it needs to be in the middle or on the inside?
 

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my996duc1 said:
what will happen if they are installed the first way ???
In the first setup the spring plate will be resting on its inner ID on the hub instead of its OD resting on a steel plate. This along with the thinner thickness of the plate where the rest of the stack is resting upon may contribute to jerky clutch release action. In some cases the clutch may make some groaning sound when engaging.

The spring plate is there to speed up the separation of the plates when the clutch lever is pulled in. People also use the thinner spring plate to modify their stack height by substituting one of the steel plates with the spring plate.

-Fariborz
 

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The convex [or concave, depending on how you view it] are there to act as a "cushion" to soften the impact of the plates as they come together. The intention is to remove the "judder" some people experience with clutch engagement [plates slamming together]. I have used as many as three [with two opposing ea. other] on difficult clutches. I have had trouble with hard launches with a few clutches [both sintered metal, and standard compound] Working with the plates usually helps. I like to try to keep stack ht within .5-1 mm. As the plates wear I'll sub a 2mm for a 1.5 etc.

That aside, I actually have found that the best race clutch I've used is a standard ST4 aluminum pack, re-shimmed for my slipper. I only have to use 1 convex plate, and the engagement seems superior to both the sintered metal yoyo packs, and barnett packs I've used in the past. Of course you have to be accurate with stack ht. On slippers [at least the yoyo that I run]you must start with a friction or when the hub rides out on the ramps during decel, the steel will drop behind the hub and screw everything. I can't speak for all designs, but the 6 ramp type that I run is like that.
 

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blade625CT said:
That aside, I actually have found that the best race clutch I've used is a standard ST4 aluminum pack, re-shimmed for my slipper. I only have to use 1 convex plate, and the engagement seems superior to both the sintered metal yoyo packs, and barnett packs I've used in the past. Of course you have to be accurate with stack ht. On slippers [at least the yoyo that I run]you must start with a friction or when the hub rides out on the ramps during decel, the steel will drop behind the hub and screw everything. I can't speak for all designs, but the 6 ramp type that I run is like that.
The shop that set my slipper up had the steel as the first plate on the outside I have had nothing but issues with it. It has the ramping system. I was having major slipping problems so I added another steel to the back to up the stack height, got rid of most of the slipping problem until I took it out on a hard ride the other day, started to slip on and off. Do you think if I start with a friction it might help stop that?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks for all the responses.
The dealer packed the clutch the first way. I had problems with the clutch slipping. I found the second way to pack it online and thought maybe the dealer made a mistake (not the first time).

I pulled the clutch apart to put new plates in and realized the packing order was not what I found online so I switched it. The friction plates measure as new (3mm). I am still having problems with the clutch going all the way out and slipping when I pull away from traffic lights.

I guess I will switch it back to the 1.5mm spring plate in the middle :confused:
OR since the plates have been mixed up and around will it ever be right :confused:
Should I just install a new clutch pack :confused:
 

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my996duc1 said:
...I am still having problems with the clutch going all the way out and slipping when I pull away from traffic lights.

I guess I will switch it back to the 1.5mm spring plate in the middle :confused:
OR since the plates have been mixed up and around will it ever be right :confused:
Should I just install a new clutch pack :confused:
There is no need to install a new clutch pack. Your stack should be put together as follows:

D = Driven steel plate 2 mm thick
S = Spring plate 1.5 mm thick (aka concave plate) with the dot on the plate on the outside
F = Friction plate

Engine side [D, D, F, S, F, D, F, D, F, D, F, D, F, D, F, D] Pressure Plate

If your clutch was slipping, it is possible that the pressure plate was not put on correctly. One of the studs on the hub has a notch on it. On the Pressure Plate, around one of the holes there are two arrows. That hole has to be on the stud with the notch on it. Failure to do so, will force the pressure plate to not rest on the last Driven steel plate and instead rest on the lip of the splines on the hub. That would cause clutch slippage.

I hope this helps.

-Fariborz
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thank you !!!
I will change it out and give it a try to see how it works.
 

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lastblast said:
The shop that set my slipper up had the steel as the first plate on the outside I have had nothing but issues with it. It has the ramping system. I was having major slipping problems so I added another steel to the back to up the stack height, got rid of most of the slipping problem until I took it out on a hard ride the other day, started to slip on and off. Do you think if I start with a friction it might help stop that?

If it is slipping during engagement or while riding, and is a new pack, I would suspect that the stack height is incorrect. My "ideal" slipper stack ht is 35.5mm [yours could be different depending on manufacturer] I would check the specs. for your clutch. I start [closest to engine] with a friction, and end [against the pressure plate] with a steel driven plate. On the clutch pack I'm running right now, I'm finishing with two driven [it was necc. to keep proper stack ht.]

This may help, but it is specific to Yoyo slippers. Note that the clutch pack they supply in their kit [which I no longer use] has four convex spring plates:
http://www.yoyodyneti.com/ProductInfo.aspx?productid=T10901

this could also be handy if you don't have a large selection of old steel plates of varying thickness:
http://www.yoyodyneti.com/ProductInfo.aspx?productid=T10999
 

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blade625CT said:
On slippers [at least the yoyo that I run]you must start with a friction or when the hub rides out on the ramps during decel, the steel will drop behind the hub and screw everything. I can't speak for all designs, but the 6 ramp type that I run is like that.
Mine too. And yes, I did that once. Didn't brake anything, but I did have to take the hub out and put it back together again.

Anyway, in my experience, other than starting with the correct plate type for your hub type (friction for slipper, steel for OEM), and setting the correct stack heit for slippers (not so important with a normal clutch, as long as it's not TOO high), the ordering of the plates really doesn't matter.

And the curved plates are to make the clutch more progressive, NOT to 'make the plates separate faster'. Actuall, the plates will separate faster with NO curved plates, but the clutch will be much more on/off, i.e. either fully engaged or fully dis-engaged.

Tom
 

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Just installed a Barnett clutch pack on my 2001 748, followed the install according to barnett and it did not work. I had the clutch all the way in first gear and the bike would still try to lunge forward, hard to shift. I took it apart and followed their instruction, works great! So do not listen to barnett on how to install the plates (stupid I know, they should know how to install their own plates), install according to the Haynes, in my case it should be int his order


Engine side [2mm,2mm , F, 1.5mm, F, 2mm, F, 2mm, F, 2mm, F, 2mm, F, 2mm, F, 2mm] Pressure Plate
 

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AzCamel said:
Just installed a Barnett clutch pack on my 2001 748, followed the install according to barnett and it did not work. I had the clutch all the way in first gear and the bike would still try to lunge forward, hard to shift. I took it apart and followed their instruction, works great! So do not listen to barnett on how to install the plates (stupid I know, they should know how to install their own plates), install according to the Haynes, in my case it should be int his order


Engine side [2mm,2mm , F, 1.5mm, F, 2mm, F, 2mm, F, 2mm, F, 2mm, F, 2mm, F, 2mm] Pressure Plate
Good luck with the Barnett's unless they have come out with something different I had a hell of a time with them. I burned up 3 sets in less than 500 miles. they kept sending me new sets, then they sent me a set that they used to make a few years back but could not get the material anymore and they worked great for about 1000 miles or so untill a chunk came off of one and got hung up on the drum. probably still would work after cleanning everything but I just put a new set of OEM steel plates in. I think that the newer 999 plates work though on the 996's and they are aluminum friction plates
 

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update...
cannot shift down gears until i get below 4k rpm , esp from 2 to 1st, also cannot get into nuetral.. shifting up is great, smooth. When sitting at the light it is impossible to shift into nuetral, and the clutch will not fully disenuage, it screeps forward with the clutch full in, i have a STM slave clutch also. I am very disaspointed in the Barnett, I also droped the bike because it lunged forward with the clutch in. Has anyone else with the older superbike install the barnett.

BTW, i am sorry for the spelling, i'm sort of drunk after a night of drinking at home.
 

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lastblast said:
The shop that set my slipper up had the steel as the first plate on the outside I have had nothing but issues with it. It has the ramping system. I was having major slipping problems so I added another steel to the back to up the stack height, got rid of most of the slipping problem until I took it out on a hard ride the other day, started to slip on and off. Do you think if I start with a friction it might help stop that?
your slipper should have a flange on the inside of the hub. If that is the case (which I suspect it is) you need to start with a friction plate; it will ride against that flange. Dont worry about wear on the flange, they are designed to work with the friction plate and wear is minimal.

I've used 6 Barnett packs in my 749 and SS without any problems. I've never had one burn up, break etc. and have only had to replace them because of tolerance on the plate tangs which has been better than the OEM. I do like the feel of the sintered material on the OEM plates, but Barnetts are only about $150.
 

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Wow...What a nightmare!

My clutch is slipping badly at 8K RPM or so. Just got back from a ride and really noticed it was getting worse. I have a 999r with stock clutch, and 5k miles. Can't believe the clutch is going out at 5k miles. Just going to get new pack. Not a slipper just yet....

Is it normal for a dry clutch to start slipping at 5K miles?

What brand should I buy?

Do I need any special tools? (I have only messed with wet clutches in the past)

HELP!!!
 

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Took the clutch apart, cleaned it with air compressor, followed barnett packing order, bleed the lines again, and move the lever position to 1 instead of 2. Works perfect, put about 100 miles on it today and worked great.
 

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Pack it any way you want (in regards to plate thickness)

Non slipper:

Two steel plates then a fiber.......then a steel, then a fiber, etc untill the pack is 38mm thick. It doesn't matter what plate ends up on the outside but I use a steel.

Slipper:

fiber first, then a steel. Alternate all the way out till you get 36mm. I end it with two steels togheter and use those to shim the stack to the right height.

Throw the wave plates in the garbage $.02
 
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