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I was on a ride this past weekend. (Labor day) I ran into an interesting problem. My clutch hub nut came loose on me. I believe the torque setting is supposed to be around 140 ft-lb. The clutch lever pull started to feel light and then nothing. No power, no shift, etc. Interesting. I pulled over to the side and was able to get the clutch apart with the standard tool kit. I found the hub nut had completely came loose. I honestly cannot remember if I torqued it to spec. So I feel I am completely to blame. A nice by standard stopped and offered help. He was able to run home and bring back a 1 1/4" socket so I could tighten the hub nut. I was able to ride the bike home after about an hour on the side of the rode. I rode it home about 40 miles no problem. I took the clutch assembly apart at home and torqued everything to spec. I did ruin my clutch spring retainer though, where it rubbed against my clutch cover. All is well now it seems. Hope this does not happen again. What a PITA!

Thanks to all those that are willing to stop and help a stranded motorcycle rider.

Note to self: Make sure you tighten all nuts and bolts to spec.

Everyone ride safe, and thanks to those here that have taught me everything here.
 

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You are fortunate it happened so close to home. The same thing happened to Mark Turbo a few years back in the wilds of the Oregon Outback, miles from anywhere. Yet another advantage of the dry clutch over the wet clutch, you can make emergency repairs without draining the oil.
 

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You are fortunate it happened so close to home. The same thing happened to Mark Turbo a few years back in the wilds of the Oregon Outback, miles from anywhere. Yet another advantage of the dry clutch over the wet clutch, you can make emergency repairs without draining the oil.
You don't need to drain the oil on a wet clutch bike to service the clutch. You work with it on the side stand be it in a garage or on the side of the road. If there're any advanages, it would be running an "open" clutch cover on a dry clutch may allow access to the hub nut without having to remove the cover, and there's no need for any "gasket", but generally speaking, you'll need to work on a wet clutch a lot less than a dry one.
 
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