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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 620 Sport with a wet clutch. I am averaging about 7.5k miles between clutch pack replacements. From what I understand about clutches, the only wear is on the friction plates and not on the steel plates. It seems like it would be cheaper to be able to order packs with just the friction plates and reuse the steel plates. So on to my actual question:

Is there any place or manufacturer that sells just the friction plates for my bike?
 

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Any particular reason you're getting such short life out of clutches?
 

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I've been told by techs at 3 separate places that this is standard for these (guessing by 'these' they mean SS wet clutch) bikes. it seemed quite short to me too which is why I asked.
Does your 620 have the APTC clutch, or was that only the 800's?
 

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7500 km, thats about 4500 miles. That seems like a very short clutch life, unless you're in a lot of stop & go traffic in a very hilly city.
When you squeeze the clutch lever does it fully disengage power to the wheel, is it dragging?
If you roll on the throttle, does the engine accelerate faster than the bike, is it slipping?
Are you running the stock gearing, which is pretty tall and can add to clutch slipping in stop and go traffic.
Do you do a lot of racing?
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Please remember that I am just asking for a source for ordering plates, but here are the answers to your questions.

7500 km, thats about 4500 miles. That seems like a very short clutch life, unless you're in a lot of stop & go traffic in a very hilly city.
No, it was 7500 (7.5k) miles. A lot of my miles are in traffic, but I would say any more than the average rider. No really hilly here, but on this clutch I have done a few rides out in the country. Hilly by comparison to normal, but large bumps compared to places like AR and TN.

When you squeeze the clutch lever does it fully disengage power to the wheel, is it dragging?
As I understand, all/most bikes can have the back wheel spin slowly when it is off the ground in Neutral or clutch engaged. I plan on having the tech fully check out the clutch settings though as I have never been taught the proper way to know what tweeks to do where.

If you roll on the throttle, does the engine accelerate faster than the bike, is it slipping?
Yeah, just in 4th/5th around 6k-9k rpm and just when I go WOT. If I slowly roll the throttle it doesn't do it, which is why I have just been living with it for the past 1000 miles.

Are you running the stock gearing, which is pretty tall and can add to clutch slipping in stop and go traffic.
-1 in front, stock rear, but as I said above, only slips in 4th/5th not at slow stop-and-go speeds

Do you do a lot of racing?
Two track days on this last one. Original lasted 6400 miles with no track days. This one lasted 8500 and two track days before it started slipping.

Bella749 said:
Does your 620 have the APTC clutch, or was that only the 800's?
Don't know what the APTC clutch is, but my 03 620 clutch plate pack has the same part number (190.2.009.2B) as the 06 800.
 

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I would think calling the manufacture directly might find you the answer?

For example, Barnett is in Cali:

Barnett Tool & Engineering
2238 Palma Drive
Ventura, CA 93003

Phone : (805) 642-9435

Office Hours : 8:00 a.m.- 4:00 p.m.- PST- Monday- Friday

Otherwise you might want to shoot DesmoTimes and email and ask them if you can just purchase the friction plates.

GL!
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I would think calling the manufacture directly might find you the answer?

For example, Barnett is in Cali:

Barnett Tool & Engineering
2238 Palma Drive
Ventura, CA 93003

Phone : (805) 642-9435

Office Hours : 8:00 a.m.- 4:00 p.m.- PST- Monday- Friday

Otherwise you might want to shoot DesmoTimes and email and ask them if you can just purchase the friction plates.

GL!
FYI, called Barnett, and for my clutch pack (306-22-10001) they only do the complete kit. :(
 

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FYI, called Barnett, and for my clutch pack (306-22-10001) they only do the complete kit. :(
That sucks - what clutch packs are you using? I've seen lots of post about Barnette wearing out the fastest and people using either OEM or Surflex. My OEM plates lasted 9.6K miles....I'm gonna try the Surflex next and I'm hoping they last just as long as OEM plates.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
I am using the OEM right now, but my tech (Brad Miller of MotionSBK) is going to be using another company. Its about $40 more than Barnett but he said it will last longer. While talking with him I mentioned it would be nice if you could just get the plates cause it would cost less, and thats the birth of this thread.

I just got off the phone with Hinson Racing, asked if they sell a wet clutch pack. Her answer, after asking someone was "yes, we do wet clutches...for all but Ducati". :(

Time to look up Surflex. If ya'll know wny other manu's, post em up.
 

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The reason why I asked, is the APTC (Adler Power Torque Clutch) is a type of slipper clutch. They tend to be harder on friction plates than a standard clutch. This may be a contributing factor to your limited clutch life. According to the Ducati website, the 620 is equipped with this feature. And to answer your initial qustion, I have not found replacement friction plates by themselves, just complete packs.

"APTC clutch
This exclusive device provides a torque delivery which is a function of the torque applied to it. This makes it possible to considerably reduce the force required to operate the handlebar clutch lever, while ensuring transmission of engine torque to the gearbox primary shaft.
Depending on the design of the APTC clutch components, the transmissible torque, for a given size of clutch disk, can be conveniently increased over that transmitted by a conventional clutch. Another important feature of the unit is its capacity to automatically limit the reverse torque ("slipper clutch") generated during aggressive deceleration.
The APTC clutch was developed for the smallest Ducati two-cylinder engine, the Desmodue 620 i.e., and is now also used on the Desmodue 800 i.e.. In a conventional clutch, the maximum drive torque transmitted from the crankshaft to the primary gearbox shaft depends on the contact surface between each driven and driving clutch disk (and hence their average radius), on the friction coefficient of the disk material and the force with which the disk pack is driven together (which is a simple function of the cylindrical coil springs acting on the pressure plate).
In the APTC clutch, on the other hand, the force compressing the disk pack is not dependent merely on the pressure plate springs, but is also due to the special design of the hub, in other words, the internal device driven by the driven disks and mounted to the primary gearbox shaft. In this way the pressure plate coil springs, which are bolted to the drum studs, need not supply the full load required to compress the clutch disk pack in order to transmit the engine torque.
This significantly reduces the hand force required to operate the handlebar lever compared to that required for a traditional clutch design. The design of the drum is the key to the secret of the APTC clutch. The drum actually generates part of the load on the disk pack as a function of the engine torque. This load thus makes it possible to transmit increasingly higher torques, up to the limit determined by the size specification of the device and the friction between the disks themselves.
To sum up, the relation between the clutch input torque (applied torque) and the output torque (transmitted torque) is linear, while with a conventional clutch this ratio is fixed at its maximum, even when the actual applied torque is lower than the maximum transmissible value.
This is due to the fact that the load exerted by the pressure plate springs is always constant. Applying the same logic, but in the opposite direction of torque transmission, the greater the reverse torque applied to the APTC clutch, the lower its transmission to the crankshaft."

more info here: http://www.sportrider.com/bikes/2004/146_04_ducati_aptc_clutch/index.html
 

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Discussion Starter #12
The reason why I asked, is the APTC (Adler Power Torque Clutch) is a type of slipper clutch. They tend to be harder on friction plates than a standard clutch. This may be a contributing factor to your limited clutch life. According to the Ducati website, the 620 is equipped with this feature. And to answer your initial qustion, I have not found replacement friction plates by themselves, just complete packs.

more info here: http://www.sportrider.com/bikes/2004/146_04_ducati_aptc_clutch/index.html
From what I can see on the link, that applies to the '04 620 Monster. Mine is the '04 620 Sport. Using that link to get to the write up on mine (http://www.sportrider.com/bikes/2003/146_03_ducati_supersport_models/index.html), it does state:

The service life of the new lighter clutch is much greater, due to the more balanced wear factor of aluminium alloy to the friction pates and the clutch is also quieter due to improved tolerances and the lower resonance value of aluminium vs. steel.
If its much greater, how short was the life of the old SS line?
 

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Discussion Starter #13 (Edited)
With finances tight right now, I am going to try the 'restacking' talked about in another thread. I figure it can't hurt (unless I put it back together wrong) and I'll gain a little knowledge about my bike that I can use for future plans. I want to either do the dry clutch conversion or the 'open' wet clutch mod, but have too much on the plate this time around.

My big question is, are there any consumables I will need (ie o-rings, washers, gaskets) to replace as part of the process? The manual mentions to check several, but are there any more likely to bad that I should get and count on replacing? I'm doing this on a Sunday so I can't just run up to the dealer.

Also, if anyone has torqu values for this bike ('03 620 Sport) that would be helpful. My manual only lists the clutch nut (190 nM).
 

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to get more life out of my m900 (dry) clutch, I took all the plates out and sanded the glazed parts off both sides of each friction plate, them put them back in in a different order. It helped. Maybe it will work w/ the wet clutch too.
 

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I know you just want to find a source for the friction plates, but I think something is wrong. I put over 14K miles on an 2006 Multistrada 620 that had a slipper clutch. And I have nearly 8K miles on an 2003 Monster 620 (which is pretty much the same engine and tranny as yours) and the clutch is just fine. The plates should last much longer than 7-8K miles even if you're really rough.

Just my $.02
 

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I did over 96,000 kms on my 750SS. I blasted the steel plates at one stage - never replaced the plates (they're still in it). Ported, 900 cams, FCR carbs etc. That bike spent a lot of time with its throttle pinned, including Phillip Is trackdays, clutch 'fanning' to compensate for gaps in 5-speed box and limited power - it didn't enjoy an easy life!
By which I am suggesting that your clutch is obviously SLIPPING. There needs to be clearance between the lever and master-cylinder piston when lever is right out. Check it out with a Ducati mechanic. Maybe someone changed the lever and didn't adjust that vital freeplay.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I decided to go with the Barnett complete pack. Good thing is that my clutch basket is in pristine shape. I think I noticed maybe one nick in it. I will be puting the new pack in tomorrow, but my manual seems to be missing some torque specs. Does anyone have the torque specs for the following for my bike (2003 620 SS)?

clutch cover bolts
clutch spring bolts
oil plug
oil screen

Also, for each of these parts, to or not to use Loctite?
 
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