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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 2015 monster 1200 that is new to me. First ride and got a puncture. The tires are original so they are due for a change anyway.

Considering what could be the best option for me.
I come from cruiser background, and I don't plan to track the bike other than maybe a couple of times. No long touring either, only one day rides. It is important to cover my ass if I get caught out in the NW rains, so the tire should perform well in rain.

I am considering Michelin Road 5 tires but they are $$$ (600$ with mounting). Diablo Rosso 2s are cheap and seems like a good compromise for me ($150 cheaper).

Any advice will be much appreciated.
Thanks!
 

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Retired Pipe Polisher C2H6O+
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Both are good choices.

The Michelin will last a little longer.
The Pirelli will be a little grippier and a little better handling.

The Michelin will be a little better in the wet.
The Pirelli will be good enough in the wet and better in the dry.






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Duckman is as always spot on with his tire advice. Have you priced out Michelin Pilot Road 4? They are not quite as good at water management as the Road 5, but still really good in the rain. They might be a bit cheaper being an older version.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks!

Is it worth getting the tools (headstand and rear stand, sockets for wheel removal; I have most other tools including a torque wrench) to remove the tire and do the mounting myself in the garage?

How often do you get punctures I wonder? If this happens more than once it might just be worth to get the tools.
 

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Any excuse to buy new tools is a good one. :)

Even if you just take the wheels off yourself and take them to the shop to have the tires changed can save you some money.


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Discussion Starter #6
Any excuse to buy new tools is a good one. :)

Even if you just take the wheels off yourself and take them to the shop to have the tires changed can save you some money.


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I think this is what I have in mind! :)
 

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Definitely get the tools to remove the wheels. I change my own tires (and I swear all of Chattanooga’s tires). I do it by hand with levers. The first time you do it, you will curse the tire and the wheel and me for suggesting it. After that first time, it’s pretty easy. Learn the techniques and it’s no problem. A tire changer machine is great, but not necessary.

Somewhere on here I actually did a tutorial on tire changes by hand.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I guess this is just the nudge I needed.

Decided to go the "full swap on my own"/DIY route!
Let me know if there are any gotchas that you folks want to callout. Otherwise I will watch some youtube videos and go from there.
 

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Don’t listen to T-bills! He’s insane. It’s suiside. You’ll put you eye out. :)

Buy peroxide and bandaids. Lots of bandaids. :)


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Discussion Starter #10
lol.. I have tried a few projects on my vehicles and totally can see something bad happening.

For me the worst thing are the stands at the moment. Local dealers dont seem to have one in stock and it would suck to wait for a week or two for them to arrive if I order them online :-(
 

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@DuckMan you big baby!

Buy some lube. Nomar makes some stuff that works well. (No-Mar Tire Mounting Lube Paste - RevZilla) Line up the beads. This will made it much easier to get the old tire off, the new tire on, and to seat the new tires’ beads. Laugh all you want, but I have used water based sex lube as a substitute. It works just fine. I haven't tried using the Nomar stuff as a substitute for sex lube.

Get a bead popper. (Motion Pro Bead Popper | 20% ($3.60) Off! - RevZilla) Combine this with a weighted mallet and you will have the beads broken in no time.

The biggest piece of advice is to make sure you get the side opposite of where you are working down in the middle of the rim. The cross section of the rim is not flat. The middle portion is a smaller diameter than the outer portion. This allows the whole tire to shift eccentrically to the side you are trying to work. I put my knees on the portion closest to me while I work the levers on the far side. If you don't do this, you will never get the tire off/on. This is the source of most of the cursing.

Feel free to hit me up with PM. I'm happy to entertain phone calls if you have questions or get started and have difficulties.
 

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$600 seems very expensive. I have gotten good deals and paid anywhere from $300-450 for set of brand name tires installed by the dealer. If you are a mild rider, the newer sports touring tires last longer, handle well and do very well in the rain. Angels GT 2 are more equivalent to the pilot road 5. Metzlers also have excellent choices. See what the dealer has in stock - it’s usually cheaper. I wanted pilot road 5 but would cost me over $150 more installed and I needed to wait. Ended up with Pirelli GT 2 and am very happy.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Yeah.. It seems everything is expensive in Seattle (or any city for that matter). 450$ is super reasonable to me. $600 is just too high :-(

I am a mild rider for sure. I have decided to go with sports touring style tires.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
At this point I would like to admit that I have chickened out and decided to spend the $$$ :-(


I just could not wait until the tools arrived! The rear stand alone was 350$ at my local dealer which is bonkers. I will start hunting for used deals on the stands for the future.
 

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Dunlop road smarts. Great tire, good mileage, cheap. Myichelin PR4s are buzzy, slow turning pieces of shit. Never ran a PR5, but heard a lot of good things.

Yes, this is all opinion. But I wouldn't give a PR4 to my dog to chew on😂
 

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Also forgot to mention the metzler roadtec 01 get great reviews - similar to the PR5
 

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I don't plan to track the bike other than maybe a couple of times. No long touring either, only one day rides. It is important to cover my ass if I get caught out in the NW rains, so the tire should perform well in rain.

I am considering Michelin Road 5 tires but they are $$$ (600$ with mounting). Diablo Rosso 2s are cheap and seems like a good compromise for me ($150 cheaper).

Any advice will be much appreciated.
Thanks!
What has been completely missed so far is that your choice of tires are not comparable.
You're comparing a Touring tire (Road 5) with a Sport tire (Diablo Rosso 2), a discontinued model may I add.

If there's a take-away from this comment, it's the choice of category that should take precedence based on your riding type and style. Given the competitiveness between the top five tire manufacturers, the differences within the same category are very minute.

Tire Categories include:
Enduro Street [Tarmac & Dirt] (i.e. Scorpions, Tourance etc)
Touring [All Weather & Mileage] (i.e. Angel GT2, Road 5, Roadtec 01)
Sport [All Weather & Lean Angle] (i.e. Rosso 3, Power 5, etc)
Hyper Sport [Road & Track 80/20] (i.e. Rosso Corsa, Power RS, etc)
Superbike [Road & Track 20/80] (i.e. Super Corsa, Power Cup 2, etc)

The Brand at this point is secondary where it then comes down to preferred characteristics such as, but not limited to price, looks or familiarity.
 
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Discussion Starter #19
Thanks for the insight. I guess this is what I wanted to get out for the most part. Your argument is spot on. As a noob will the difference between sport and touring matter for me, vs a better rain grip due to me being in the Pacific NW?


In the end I went for Touring option (although it sucks to see the same model on the adventure/sport touring bikes at the shop ;-) ). It will help me master the art of chicken stripping the tires and put in a couple of thousand miles in the first year before I decide to push it a bit harder.

For reference - At this point I am trying to learn the art of downshifting/blipping while braking and leg position while leaning. So still learning the basics and I do not see the point of a sport tire on the bike.
 

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Good on you for doing it yourself, you’ll always learn something. Remember to line up the red dot with the valve stem, BEFORE levering the tire on. It will get your balance that much closer out the gate.
 
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