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Discussion Starter #1
I've had this problem on my 900ss on the track and haven't been able to alleviate it with the stock clip-ons. I took delivery on the bike last Wednesday and immediately took it to the track on Friday. In the 20 minute sessions, for the last 5 my hands start to go to sleep due to the vibrations. I've gone so far as to stuff clay inside the stock bars on my 900SS, but it's still giving me problems & I didn't notice that much of a difference.

Yes, the first response is to quit gripping the bars so tight, and I don't. I actually find that when I have a light grip on the bars it gets worse quicker in the session.

I'm thinking that a set of aftermarket clip-ons with a more solid bar will help to alleviate this as well as a more heavy bar end/slider.

So my question is this for all of those xx9 riders on the track (specifically xx9R riders due to the difference in the way the motors rev & power delivery)...

What clip-ons have you found to alleviate this? Is it worth going with the carbon fiber tube for carbon fiber's damping properties?
 

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Jan, are you sure it's vibration and not the position of the bars? I never have a vibe issue with my other 749, and the R goes out next month. So far, no vibe issues with the few miles I've put on the R. In fact, it feels even smoother than my bip.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Let me preface this whole thing by stating that coming from a pretty decent acoustic background...so damping vibrations isn't anything new to me...lol

(1) Change your grip more often and loosen your grip somewhat. We grip the handlebars tightly in order to maintain the throttle position and our body position. Unfortunately the tighter the grip the better the transfer of the vibration to our hands. Since it’s harder to vary your throttle hand position you probably have noticed that this hand is most affected by numbness.
This hasn't worked for me, ever since I've started riding, unfortunately. I'm able to do longer days without issue (600+ miles), it's the higher revs that have caused the problem. As mentioned in an above post, it actually seems to be worse the looser my grip on the bars at the track...which is how it should be at the track. I work VERY hard at strengthening my core and at using my core to hold myself up while riding, NOT my arms. My wrists and my arms NEVER get tired while riding.

(2) Use foam grips ($5 grips from a bicycle shop work very well). You can lessen vibration by isolating yourself and/or the bars from the vibration source by positioning a cushion (low frequency spring) along the path of vibration (foam between your hands and the bars) and/or use something to isolate the bars (i.e. rubber mounts) or the engine (i.e. softer motor mounts) from the rest of the bike at high frequencies. You can also try new riding gloves with thicker leather or gel padding on the palms ... every bit will help. Use different gloves if your fingertips touch the ends of your glove fingers while riding causing any vibration to get transmitted directly to the nerves in your fingers.
I've tried a number of different grips and different gloves. Foam grips on the track isn't so cool for me though...lol. The different grips hasn't made a difference enough to make it worth wild.

Being that I have pretty small hands and being that high end motorcycle gloves for women are no where NEAR the same level of protection as they are for men (don't even get me started on THAT subject...lol), I'm pretty limited on my glove selection...I've spent about 3 hours at MotoLiberty here in Dallas (http://www.motoliberty.com) trying on all different types of gauntlet gloves before finally settling on my current glove.

(3) Add weight to the handlebars - at the ends - LOTS of it. The handlebar is actually responding to the engine's vibrations and will vibrate in harmony (resonate) at certain engine RPM. You can change the resonant frequency of the handlebars so that the bars do not respond to the engine vibration at say cruising speeds (shorter stiffer bars will tend to cause the high amplitude vibration to shift to higher speeds, longer or weighted bars will tend to cause high amplitude vibration to shift to lower speeds). Some manufacturers include weighted bar-ends as part of the design.
This is why I packed the stock bars with damping clay on my 900. It didn't improve enough to notice and I took delivery on the 749R before being able to go much further with it. Thus the reason I'm looking at clip-ons here in addition to bar ends (with slider properties preferably). My thought is that a bar that either has more mass as it seems that some of these aftermarket clip-ons do, being milled from aluminum, or being made from carbon fiber, will be a better starting ground than the stock bar.

I'm just interested in getting some others opinions on what clip-ons they've used for track use, not for touring use. How the mass of the bar has changed anything, if it's changed anything at all.

(4) Install Helibars to provide a more straight up sitting position. Sportbikes have a more forward riding position, that puts more weight on your hands that helps transfer vibration more effectively.
Not such an option for a track bike really. I swapped from my Cycle Cats on my 900ss back to the stock bars for the track to get myself more down and over the front end.

Thanks for your post, I'm sure others have benefited greatly from it.

I'll put it this way...we have 6 world titles in car audio competition. This is $100,000+ home audio in a car. Sound deadening and damping is the name of the game. But if you don't have a solid base to start with, you're just chasing your tail at that point. If I can find a solid set of clip-ons to start with, I'll be required to do less work in the long run, and in the event of a wreck @ the track, I'll be able to throw another bar on there with very little prep work and be on my way...hopefully.
 

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I've got a base 999 with woodcraft clip-ons. They are hollow. I have no issues with vibration or with my hands falling asleep while on the track.

Two other possible explanations for your hands falling asleep are:
1. Glove/sleeve too tight at the wrist. Have you changed your gear recently or are you torquing down on the gauntlet strap? Another riding position issue that can exacerbate it is riding with your wrists extended (think stop-in-the-name-of-love position, or as though you are doing a push-up). You can be light on the grip but still be extended. This can pinch a nerve, causing the equivalent of carpel tunnel syndrome.

2. Your head is getting buffeted by the wind while your neck is extended (while sitting at your computer, look at the ceiling; this is the extended position). If the spinal cord in your neck is in a tight canal, extending your neck combined with the wind shaking it around can put pressure on the spine, irritating it, leading to the hand numbness (paresthesias, if you want to be fancy).

Just a thought.

Chris
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Two other possible explanations for your hands falling asleep are:
1. Glove/sleeve too tight at the wrist. Have you changed your gear recently or are you torquing down on the gauntlet strap? Another riding position issue that can exacerbate it is riding with your wrists extended (think stop-in-the-name-of-love position, or as though you are doing a push-up). You can be light on the grip but still be extended. This can pinch a nerve, causing the equivalent of carpel tunnel syndrome.
Gear isn't too tight around the wrist...that's one area I can't stand gear tight...lol

This could be the issue, but bringing back the bar would put them @ an angle that would not allow for the appropriate leverage...I just went back and looked at pictures and it looks as if my arms are strait through the wrist...so I'm not sure if this is the problem. I'm headed back to the track on the 20th possible and the 25th for certain, I'll be paying attention to it then.

2. Your head is getting buffeted by the wind while your neck is extended (while sitting at your computer, look at the ceiling; this is the extended position). If the spinal cord in your neck is in a tight canal, extending your neck combined with the wind shaking it around can put pressure on the spine, irritating it, leading to the hand numbness (paresthesias, if you want to be fancy).
This is a likely culprit as well considering a past neck injury...I've actually had to work on my head position while on the street. Instead of extending my chin out and looking up, I've had to focus on bringing the back of my of my head up...if that makes any sense...lol

I try to carry this over to the track, but who knows when you're in the moment...:D

Yet one more thing to pay attention to while out next time around. :)
 
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