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Of course you could make your own--But for $ 22.00 it's not worth taking to time to make one lol--My time is worth more the that
 

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Fast fact : my 1992 851 came with one from new. Never saw another ducati with one so either someone along the way added it (magazine bike). I have never seen a failure with one installed so I am not sure how much it helps but I do not think it hurts either way. I do see them helping prevent wear from loose/worn chains so for that reason I do recommend them.
 

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Retired Pipe Polisher C2H6O+
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Very true but are you making that large a gearing change to need different length chains? lol.. you are a better man than I am as I hate putting on rain tires at the track let alone swapping chains and gearing. Then again I am lazy. You clearly have a serious effort and want to save weight and friction by losing the o-rings, that is not a dig. I have customers who file the ends of bolts off if the protrude through the nut, just to save weight.

I am with you 1000% on not every situation being the same and as I said I do use both depending on application. For a street /track Ducati I would only recommend a peen type.
Oh yea. On little bikes gearing can depend on which way the wind is blowing.






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EDIT: I mean to say "clip type master link" in this posting, I left out the word ~clip~ everywhere I said "master link".

For several months I've been thinking about posting a thread regarding this exact topic, but I figured I'd get gang tackled and told what a dumass I am for even considering such an evil thing.

I have to agree with ducvet and the member that actually started this thread. In all the years I rode and raced, be it on engine powered 2, 3, and 4 wheeled vehicles, as well as years of racing in expert level BMX, I never once had a master link failure that wasn't my own fault, nor have I ever seen a master link failure on someone else's machine that wasn't their own fault. I've raced in five hundred mile long desert races where you're beating the living shit out of the bike or ATV for hour after hour, without ever having (nor seeing) a master link failure that was not the fault of the person responsible for installing it.

Carrying a few master links, a few half links, and a small chain breaker can save your ass on a long trip should the chain break. A master link also makes very short work of changing final gearing ratios without having to purchase an entirely new chain to get it done.

I'm so glad to read that members here that I deeply respect feel as I do. This is highly encouraging, and that said I think I'll go with a master link configured final drive along with carrying onboard a few masters and a few half links along with a chain breaker. Given the region of the U.S. that I will be riding in, and the highways out here having very long stretches of unsupported motoring it makes a lot of sense to me to configure the bike this way.

Thanks for the encouraging opinions to those that know their shit on this subject!!!
 

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I have the RK tool and like it for riveting. It's not a hard job but not one I would do without a good set of calipers to make sure the plates are pressed to the exact width and to measure the rivet mushroom. Both have very specific specs so if your detail oriented, its not hard to do and easy to verify you did correctly. Unless you do this for a living, I would not trust eyeballing.
 

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I have the RK tool and like it for riveting. It's not a hard job but not one I would do without a good set of calipers to make sure the plates are pressed to the exact width and to measure the rivet mushroom. Both have very specific specs so if your detail oriented, its not hard to do and easy to verify you did correctly. Unless you do this for a living, I would not trust eyeballing.
Which is exactly why I love the DID tool so much. When pressing the side plate on it will only allow you to press it on just the proper amount leaving just the right amount of pin exposed to flair and no more. And when flaring the pin it only puts pressure on the pin and not the side plate preventing over tightening.

So simple even I can do it. :)

The only thing I don’t like is having to fumble with two large wrenches to use it.




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