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I have an EK X-ring chain. They recommend this for cleaning:

What should I use to clean my chain?

Never clean your sealed chain with pressure washers, steam cleaning, wire brushes, or volatile solvents such as gasoline, mineral spirits, contact cleaner or acetone, all of which can damage the O-rings. Kerosene may be safely used for cleaning, provided you have adequate ventilation and no ignition sources nearby. Commercial spray-on chain cleaners typically must be rinsed off with water. This could lead to the formation of rust, so use of these products is discouraged.

For chain lubrication:

What kind of chain lube should I use?

The O-rings or Quadra-X Rings on an EK chain only seal the factory-installed grease between the pins and bushings. As with any chain, you still need to lubricate between the bushings and rollers to prolong service life.

Sealed chains should be lubed only with lubricants specifically marked as being suitable for O-ring chains. A good chain lube should adhere well and have good penetrating qualities to get deep inside the spaces between bushings and rollers.

Non-sealed chains may be lubed with any quality chain lube, or SAE 80/90 wt. oil.
 

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"kerosene isn't routinely stocked in a garage" WTF! We have a parts washer full of the stuff, a drum with a spigot and a bottle always full. Even before I had the luxury of enough kerosene to bathe in (that is a metaphor for how much we have, as distinct from my chosen hygiene practices:)), I always used it to clean sprockets and chains. Its cheap, it works, yes its yucky and I am careful not to go out into polite company when I have been working on the bike - havoc with the nails and yes we do have good hand cleaner and a nail brush, but it is mucky - must remember I now have access to chemical resistant gloves.:confused:

Yes, I believe that with cable ties and a can of WD40 and a roll of duct tape you can fix almost everything, but kerosense is a good cleaner and WD40 whilst good is expensive.
 

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Yes, kerosene is the way to go. If you have a compressor, pick up a spray bar from harbor freight tools, drip pan under the chain area. Spray and let soak. Use a parts brush to brush the chain, If you have a wheel stand you can roll the rim as you brush.

If you do no have a compressor use the parts brush to wet the chain, let set and brush again.

After the wait use a garden hose to wash the kerosene away.

Use a rag to wipe the chain dry and apply your favorite chain lube.

Thanks

Joe
 

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Yes, kerosene is the way to go. If you have a compressor, pick up a spray bar from harbor freight tools, drip pan under the chain area. Spray and let soak. Use a parts brush to brush the chain, If you have a wheel stand you can roll the rim as you brush.

If you do no have a compressor use the parts brush to wet the chain, let set and brush again.

After the wait use a garden hose to wash the kerosene away.

Use a rag to wipe the chain dry and apply your favorite chain lube.

Thanks

Joe

thats what I do or wd40 and it gets it like new again I pull the sprocket cover off also to get the gunk in between the case and sprocket
 

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I like to go to the paint store and get 5 gallons of "deodorized mineral spirits", also known as paint thinner. It's like kerosene, but doesn't stink, and it evaporates quicker. I also use it in my parts washer.
 

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I like to go to the paint store and get 5 gallons of "deodorized mineral spirits", also known as paint thinner. It's like kerosene, but doesn't stink, and it evaporates quicker. I also use it in my parts washer.
I would watch it using Mineral Spirits - this has a lower flash point of only 110F and if your bike is just a little hot, it can potentially explode. Kerosene has a higher flash point and also contains more petroleum which is better for the O ring seals. Using the wrong solvent can damage the chain by acting as a penetrate, dissolving the petroleum in the grease and leaving just the dirt and carriers. This is why WD40 is not recommended. The residues left behind then begin acting as abrasives.
 

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WD-40 Chain Cleaning and Lubrication

All motorcycle chains currently being manufactured use Buna-N (nitrile) rubber for their o-rings and x-rings, and all these manufacturers recommend kerosene as a cleaner.

Alternatively, you can use WD-40 that is composed of 80% Stoddard Solvent (mineral spirits), 20% light lubricating oil, and a bit of fragrance.

WD-40, used as a one-step cleaner and lubricant is sufficient. Because it is a light oil, some fling-off will occur, so any excess should be wiped-off. USED REGULARLY, it provides good corrosion protection, low (but not the lowest) rolling resistance, and attracts less road grit than waxy chain lubes. So your chain stays very clean.

If you aren't inclined to clean and lube your chain regularly, or often ride in wet conditions that promote corrosion, there are chain lubes on the market that are designed to stick to your chain to resist fling-off and provide longer-lasting corrosion protection. Some remain tacky and attract grit, some stay slippery to the touch. All of them need to cleaned off and renewed at some point.

If you’ve decided to use chain lube after cleaning your chain, then it’s best to use straight kerosene or mineral spirits as your cleaner because the light oil that WD-40 contains will make it difficult for the chain lube to stay attached without flinging-off.

The only residue left by WD-40 is a light machine oil that is a lubricant, not an abrasive.
 

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I would watch it using Mineral Spirits - this has a lower flash point of only 110F and if your bike is just a little hot, it can potentially explode. Kerosene has a higher flash point and also contains more petroleum which is better for the O ring seals. Using the wrong solvent can damage the chain by acting as a penetrate, dissolving the petroleum in the grease and leaving just the dirt and carriers. This is why WD40 is not recommended. The residues left behind then begin acting as abrasives.
Baloney. It's also known as Stoddard Solvent or white spirit, and is regarded as a safety solvent. I've personally used it in parts washers for over 50 years, as have countless thousands of repair shops across the country. Its fire rating is 2, the same as kerosene. I wear gloves when I wash parts, but only because it will pull the oils out of the skin and cause minor irritation. It is not carcinogenic. It will not affect buna-N o-rings.
 

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Baloney. It's also known as Stoddard Solvent or white spirit, and is regarded as a safety solvent. I've personally used it in parts washers for over 50 years, as have countless thousands of repair shops across the country. Its fire rating is 2, the same as kerosene. I wear gloves when I wash parts, but only because it will pull the oils out of the skin and cause minor irritation. It is not carcinogenic. It will not affect buna-N o-rings.
WD-40's formula is a trade secret it was intended to displace water on the skins of rockets, not to be used as a bearing lubricant. Its use as such, under FAA regulations is prohibited. Use what you want, it's your engine case that'll get beat and holed when the chain fails. Just because a "shop" uses it doesn't mean it a good idea. Search the pages of these forums and you will find plenty of evidence of lazy mechanics and shoddy workmanship. I happen to know a dozen Aircraft mechanics (several are Ducati owners) and they say "No way-wrong stuff-not approved". Again use what you want.

. The product is not patented in order to avoid completely disclosing its ingredients. WD-40's main ingredients, according to U.S. Material Safety Data Sheet information, are:

* 50%: Stoddard solvent (i.e., mineral spirits)
Mineral Spirits, also called Stoddard solvent [CAS 8052-41-3], is a petroleum distillate commonly used as a paint thinner and mild solvent. Outside of the United States and Canada, it is referred to as white spirit. In industry, mineral spirits is used for cleaning and degreasing machine tools and..somewhat similar to kerosene) but it is not kerosene.
* 25%: Liquefied petroleum gas is now used instead to reduce WD-40's considerable flammability)
* 15+%: Mineral oil
Mineral oil
Mineral oil or liquid petroleum is a by-product in the distillation of petroleum to produce gasoline and other petroleum based products from crude oil. It is a transparent, colorless oil composed mainly of alkanes and cyclic paraffins, related to petroleum jelly.
* 10-%: Inert ingredients

The above formula is not kerosene, it is a formulation.

This is a ball and races in a sealed bearing that had been subjected to regular use of WD-40 for a year or two. The grease was NOT cleaned out before taking this photo - there simply is no grease and the brownish tint is really rust.


The ball had grooves (visible) and was shaped like a potato chip. The races had not evenly worn (see sectioned edge) and were rutted in spots, although neither shows too well.

We learned that WD-40 is really good for the light uses that it was intended for and that needs to be emphasized. However, it is largely a penetrant, which will do just that!

Once it penetrates into the sealed area, it dissolves the petroleum out of the grease, leaving the clay binders. What's left in the bearing is essentially dirt that cakes up, causing the balls to skid. Without the petroleum, the bearing will also rust.
 

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I have absolutely no use for WD40. I won't have any in the shop. There's nothing it does that I can't do better with cheaper solvents and lubricants. One has to admit, though, that the manufacturer has a dynamite advertising program to promote a relatively ineffective product with at least a 100% profit margin....:rolleyes:
 

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Its use as such, under FAA regulations is prohibited.
Where exactly in the Federal Aviation Regulations does the FAA prohibit the use of WD40 and what does that have to do with lubing/cleaning motorcycle chains?
 

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Thanks for the info!
 

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How to deal with grease from the chain.....

.....i'm new to Ducati and this is my first chain driven bike in many years. Just picked up a multistrada enduro and after 200 miles I have grease all over the rear wheel and swing arm. Suggestions on how to maintain the chain, how to clean up this mess, and how to avoid it going forward...would be appreciated.
 

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Clean up the mess with WD40 on a rag and use Maxima Chain Wax going forward. There's no need to lube the heck out of your chain as it is an o-ring chain with grease sealed inside.
 
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Get a can of Boeshield or similar and a can of spray lube (I use BelRay, see below). I use Boeshield as a bicycle chain lube and motorcycle and bicycle wipe down cleaner on oily/greasy parts. It is OK on painted surfaces so figure safe for the plastic too. Also to coat electronic components as it leaves a thin wax film.

As for the initial grease... Spray a very light amount of Boeshield on a paper towel and wipe down any areas with grease and do so very lightly on the outside of the chain just to get any gobs of dangling grease. Most has been spit off. Use the rag to wipe the underside of the chain guard and rear wheel. This is where Boeshield is just great to have around.

Next my preference is BelRay Super Clean Chain Lube Bel-Ray Super Clean Chain Lube | Bel-Ray Company, Inc. It will not fling off. It goes on as a spray and dries quickly leaving a tack free film. Simply wash the bike as usual and the chain doesn't collect dirt. Maybe run a small dish brush over it when washing but no need to go crazy. Let dry and put a piece of cardboard behind the chain so you can spray it without coating the rest of the bike.

I use the BelRay on my Husky as well. I think many products today may be similar. As a side note I have found none of my o-ring chains need re-tensioning. I make sure they are tensioned right and lubed after each wash. Slightly loose is better than tight.
 

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I would say the challenge on the Enduro is the fling-off on the wheel between the spokes. I would think it is tedious to get a rag into the wheel and wipe the surface down. I would definitely listen to GRR_Hyper and get a chain product that does not fling off. Don't feel too bad, my normal multi DVT seems to get a lot grimier down there at the rear driveline area than my 2013 multi did. Might just be the tan powder coating on the swing arm just shows contaminants more than the '13's black one did.
 

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I tried wd40 and it does a great job cleaning up the mess....thks. I now need to complete the clean up and then get some proper lube that won't make a mess. How frequently should I clean..lube the chain?

The owners manual recommends shell chain lube...does anyone have experience with this in terms of protection and lack of making a mess?
 

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The Suzuki Wash / Honda Wash products are spray on liquids with pump sprayers. Pump them on all of the bikes dirty lower areas with a cool bike in the shade, wait 5 minutes then hose it off with a garden hose sprayer. It gets into areas that are too difficult to access. Use a cloth to bring the shine back to the wheels and other areas.
 
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