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Discussion Starter #1
The cleaning thread seems to be last updated in 2007, so at the risk of beingannoying I thought I would top post.

Basically, by the time my used 2006 changed hands, went in immediately for 600 (680) inspection, and came home, the black paint looked like a computer screen at a deaf school.

I decided to use a "non scratch" auto towel that I got from target to just get the fingerprints off. As I got closer I saw a lot of very fine scratches, which I assume is just the nature of how the paint job wares, and not from the towel itself. Ive read in a lot of the cleaning threads that there are waxing techniques to get these out, but whats a simple, reliable one for these type of fine scrathes?

General cleaning (body): The manual says not to use "water cleaners" because it may lead to seizure. Does this mean water-based cleaners, or just water? Cant imagine that a hose off is going to hurt anything as long as it stays out of the ignition.

Also, is anyone just using soap and a sponge after they first hose off? Whats best? The manual also makes mention of chamois leather to dry. Do these cloths also work for polishing?

From old thread, Simple Green seems to be ok for the wheels and spokes as long as its diluted. WD40 in the spoke nipples, check. As far a coating of WD40 on the entire engine, what parts, and how light a coating? Anything metallic basically?

Finally, I dont see anything on here about care for the stock seat.

Thanks!
 

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General cleaning (body): The manual says not to use "water cleaners" because it may lead to seizure. Does this mean water-based cleaners, or just water? Cant imagine that a hose off is going to hurt anything as long as it stays out of the ignition.
I think when they say "water cleaners" they are referring to high pressure water cleaners as these can force water into areas where water wouldn't normally get to.
 

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Also, is anyone just using soap and a sponge after they first hose off? Whats best? The manual also makes mention of chamois leather to dry. Do these cloths also work for polishing?
Use a motorcycle or auto shampoo. Do not use dish washing detergent. It will strip your wax.

A Chamois is okay for drying. You should not use it for waxing*. For waxing use a 100% cotton towel or a micro-fiber towel.

Look for an auto detailing forum to give you more information.

________________
*When you say "polishing" I assume you mean "waxing". Polish is actually abrasive. Use a wax to protect your finish.
 

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In hard to reach places like spokes near hubs, WD40 will prevent rust. Spray it on and leave it.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
scratches / waxing

Cool. Any ideas on the small hair-fien scratches on the finish, what they come from, and how to fill them in?
 

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Cool. Any ideas on the small hair-fien scratches on the finish, what they come from, and how to fill them in?
There isn't much that will fill in a scratch. You need to buff out (by hand or with a buffer) a scratch with a fine polish. (Polish is abrasive.) After you buff out the scratch you protect the paint with wax.

Go here: http://www.griotsgarage.com/ and check out the drop down menu under Car Care. Check out the sub-topics "Polishing" and "Waxing". That will get you started.
 

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what about windex

I've spoken with a few folks who use Windex to clean their bikes. I'm hesitant to do so, it seems like it could damage the clear coat. I've used it on my windshield, but that's it. What do others think?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Wd40

About the WD40 application: some people are saying to coat the whole engine with it. Can anyone get more into detail about that? Soes this mean anything metal? The cooling fins, etc?
 

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Some people in the UK use WD-40 to coat engine cases, fasteners & cycle parts (not brakes!) as a winter protective against the salt used on the roads over here.

I prefer to use ACF-50:

http://www.acf-50.co.uk/motorcycle.htm

I'm not sure if it is sold in other countries but the stuff can be applied as a spray coating or wiped on with a cloth/rag. It does seem quite effective in preventing corrosion of casings, fasteners etc.
 

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my first bike Ive had for 35 years has never been wet on purpose,now Im over that.I wash my GT like its a duck,soap water then break out the ole leaf blower and dry it up and a nice detailing of wax on my shiny stuff and a lite coating of a protectent on the plastic and rubber stuff.
 

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About the WD40 application: some people are saying to coat the whole engine with it. Can anyone get more into detail about that? Soes this mean anything metal? The cooling fins, etc?
We used WD40 on our dirt bikes in the 80's. It works well to seal the bare metals from corrosion, but dries out rubber- the rubber intake boots, etc. After a year or two they would begin to crack...

Much better to use a silicone spray. It softens and lubricates rubber instead of ruining it. All the zink plated nuts and bolts will stay like new. I've got almost 8000 miles on my GT and the motor and all the fasteners on it are still shiny. Mud, dirt, and grime slide right off on the rare occasion when I wash it. Between washings I use spray silicone to rinse off light dirt.
 

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my first bike Ive had for 35 years has never been wet on purpose,now Im over that.I wash my GT like its a duck,soap water then break out the ole leaf blower and dry it up and a nice detailing of wax on my shiny stuff and a lite coating of a protectent on the plastic and rubber stuff.
I'm surprised you can keep a bike in Brooklyn clean...job well done.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
http://www.griotsgarage.com/category/car+care/car+waxing/car+waxes+and+sealants.do

There isn't much that will fill in a scratch. You need to buff out (by hand or with a buffer) a scratch with a fine polish. (Polish is abrasive.) After you buff out the scratch you protect the paint with wax.

Go here: http://www.griotsgarage.com/ and check out the drop down menu under Car Care. Check out the sub-topics "Polishing" and "Waxing". That will get you started.
Those products look great. I'm a little confused between paint sealant, one-step sealant, and wax. From what Ive read, the 1-step will fill the swirls and scratches and last a long time...
 
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