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Discussion Starter #1
I was wondering why my rear brake was working so poorly. gave my wheel a few twists and braked, worked fine and stopped the wheel, but then I noticed that the brake caliper was moving :eek: .

So I took a look at the caliper bolts and one of the bolts was gone and the other was about to fall out :eek:

Just my luck. First a seized link in a brand new chain and now this. Going to check all my other important bolts as well to see if nothing is loose.
 

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Yes every rainy day!!!
You get good at knowing what size wrenches to use, and can skip all over the bike faster every time...
You should be doing a look around every time you mount it too...
It is your hide and wallet ...
 

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trust me no red loctite.
use the blue

and dont believe me go to loctites website and it will tell you what color of loctite to use on what size bolt.AKA (use and torque settings)

just a example- any thing under 12 to 14 mm head on the bolt dont use red unless you want to drill it out or kill the bolt getting it off.

just my two cents after working on cars and bikes for 25yrs
 

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red loctite info

Color: Red
Service Temperature: -65°F (-54°C) to 300°F (149°C)
Cured form: Non-flammable, hard solid
Clean-Up: Uncured: Wipe with damp cloth.
Cured: Remove with a combination of soaking in methylene chloride and
mechanical abrasion such as a wire brush.
For disassembly: Heat parts up to 482°F (250°C) and separate parts while hot.
After 90 minutes @ 72°F (22°C):
Breakaway Torque:
3/8 X 16 steel nuts (grade 2) and bolts (grade 5) 75 to 225 lb·in (8.5 to 25.4 N·m)
Prevail Torque:
3/8 X 16 steel nuts (grade 2) and bolts (grade 5) 150 to 300 lb·in (16.9 to 34 N·m)
After 24 hours @ 72°F (22°C):
Breakaway Torque:
3/8 X 16 steel nuts (grade 2) and bolts (grade 5) 150 to 300 lb·in (16.9 to 34 N·m)
3/8 X 16 cadmium nuts and bolts 40 to 125 lb·in (4.5 to 14.1 N·m)
3/8 X 16 zinc nuts and bolts 40 to 125 lb·in (4.5 to 14.1 N·m)
M10 steel nuts and bolts 150 to 350 lb·in (17 to 40 N·m)

Prevail Torque:
3/8 X 16 steel nuts (grade 2) and bolts (grade 5) 200 to 355 lb·in (22.6 to 40 N·m)
3/8 X 16 cadmium nuts and bolts 150 to 300 lb·in (16.9 to 34 N·m)
3/8 X 16 zinc nuts and bolts 150 to 300 lb·in (16.9 to 34 N·m)
M10 steel nuts and bolts 200 to 350 lb·in (23 to 40 N·m)
Specifications: Tested to the requirements of:
Military Specification Mil-S-46163A
ASTM D 5363
 

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blue loctite info

Color: Blue
Service Temperature: -65°F (-54°C) to 300°F (149°C)
Cured form: Non-flammable, hard solid
Clean-Up: Uncured: Wipe with damp cloth.
Cured: Remove with a combination of soaking in methylene chloride and
mechanical abrasion such as a wire brush.
For disassembly: Shear with hand tools and remove with methylene chloride.
After 1 hour @ 72°C (22°C):
Breakaway Torque (ISO 10964):
3/8 x 16 steel nuts (grade 2) and bolts (grade 5)
Prevail Torque (ISO 10964):
3/8 x 16 steel nuts (grade 2) and bolts (grade 5)
50 to 150 lb.in. (5.6 to 17 N.m)
15 to 60 lb.in. (1.7 to 6.8 N.m)
After 24 hours @ 72°C (22°C):
Breakaway Torque (ISO 10964):
3/8 X 16 steel nuts (grade 2) and bolts (grade 5)
3/8 x 16 cadmium nuts and bolts
3/8 x 16 zinc nuts and bolts
M10 black oxide steel nuts and bolts
70 to 150 lb·in (7.9 to 17 N·m)
10 to 60 lb·in (1.1 to 6.8 N·m)
20 to 60 lb·in (2.3 to 6.8 N·m)
71 to 168 lb·in (8 to 19 N·m)
Prevail Torque (ISO 10964):
3/8 x 16 steel nuts (grade 2) and bolts (grade 5)
3/8 x 16 cadmium nuts and bolts
3/8 x 16 zinc nuts and bolts
25 to 60 lb·in (2.8 to 6.8 N·m)
4 to 40 lb.in (0.5 to 4.5 N.m)
10 to 40 lb.in (1.1 to 4.5 N.m)

Specifications: Tested to the requirements of:
Military Specification Mil-S-46163A
ASTM D 5363
 

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READ the instructions on the locktite type product.
locktite has an expiration date, shelf life.
Use fresh stuff it isn't that expensive...

What happened before locktite was invented...
If your bolts are torqued properly they should not come loose...
Not saying not to use locktite ...
use good mechanics techniques....
 

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If your bolts are torqued properly they should not come loose...
.
not true for the most part or they would have never made safety wire.
look at air planes and racing, bolts can and have backed out on there own even when torqued correctly.:D

single cylinders and v-twins are known for bolts falling off on there own,lol
 

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Check your bolts

It's funny you mention this! Last weekend I headed out for a ride up in the mountains. I had just gotten into the twisty's when I noticed the ass end slipping all over the place. Stopped and checked everything I could think of, and couldn't find anything wrong. Handling was sketchy at best, so I limped it back to my shop, where I found the seat bolt missing! The seat itself was wandering around on the subframe, and it really felt like the rear end losing traction!

So like Drinky said:

Check your bolts!
 

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Discussion Starter #14
It's funny you mention this! Last weekend I headed out for a ride up in the mountains. I had just gotten into the twisty's when I noticed the ass end slipping all over the place. Stopped and checked everything I could think of, and couldn't find anything wrong. Handling was sketchy at best, so I limped it back to my shop, where I found the seat bolt missing! The seat itself was wandering around on the subframe, and it really felt like the rear end losing traction!

So like Drinky said:

Check your bolts!
That was my first problem ever with the bike. During every ride the part bolted to the subframe would get loose and slide around, blue loctite fixed the issue once and for all.


Sent from my iPhone using MO Free
 

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I have safety wired darn near every bolt possible, even went to the trouble of getting longer bolts and making spacers so I could wire the pinch bolts. Add a little paint strip for visual cues and good to go. Loctite for the bolts that deserve it but not for all.
 

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I have safety wired darn near every bolt possible, even went to the trouble of getting longer bolts and making spacers so I could wire the pinch bolts. Add a little paint strip for visual cues and good to go. Loctite for the bolts that deserve it but not for all.
Bryce,
Can you post some photos? I have safety wired a few things like oil drain, oil filler, oil filter and hub but I would like to see what you did. I think I saw your hub wired which is where I got the idea. I found safety wire in several diameters on ebay for about $9 each.

These guys have some beautiful bolts pre-drilled for wire.
http://www.probolt-usa.com/

Thanks,
Michael
 

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Bryce,
Can you post some photos? I have safety wired a few things like oil drain, oil filler, oil filter and hub but I would like to see what you did. I think I saw your hub wired which is where I got the idea. I found safety wire in several diameters on ebay for about $9 each.

These guys have some beautiful bolts pre-drilled for wire.
Titanium, Stainless Steel, Aluminium Fasteners & Motorcycle Bolts | ProBolt

Thanks,
Michael
Sure will. I am going to tear it down tomorrow evening hopefully so I'll make sure to have the camera nearby. I'll post the photos in this thread. Some bolts I'll do with regular safety wire and some I'll do with cable-wire and crimp ends. Depending on the organization, they may or may not be ok with the latter method but for street/trackday guys who just want a little extra security, it is a fine method and much easier than normal twist wiring. IMHO.
 

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Crap.... guess my bolts aren't coming off now. :eek:
The worst part.... You can't upgrade any bolted parts in your bike now. :)

Heat the bolt head with a soldering gun or large soldering iron.
 

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Whilst you're at it you should also be checking your side stand and retaining spring pre ride.We lost a rider in the Adelaide hills this year because his side stand sping fell off and his stand hit the deck throwing him off.My mates brother was riding with/behind him and saw it happen gave way cranked over in a corner of all places.Thats why when I see the threads on people disabling the side stand switches I cringe inside.
 
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