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Discussion Starter #1
As I've got my bike in lots of pieces, all over my garage, at the moment I'm thinking about changing the Fork Oil, a while back there was a discussion about it and at nearly 20,000 miles the general consensus was that it needs doing.

I'd like to do it myself (how hard can it be?) and I have the Haynes manual, however the section on forks shows a complete strip down, is it neccessary, or advisable to completely strip them down or can I (should I?) just change the oil?

Also is it neccessary or advisable to do any servicing to the rear shock?, both rear shock and forks are Showa units.

Any tips or 'idiots' guide?........

:)
 

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I would think you'd have to strip it down to get the oil level right again. My local suspension shop charges $100 to change the front fork oil AND the rear including the nitrogen replacement. Seems well worth $100 to have it done by a pro. There's not much you can do on your own w/ the rear so it'll take a trip to a suspension shop anyways.
 

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I did mine with a friend without taking them apart. We measured the level before pouring the oil out and we measured also the amount that came out and added the same amount of new oil while keeping an eye out for the level. I used motorex 7,5W oil.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for the replies, not sure what to do now - doubt I can find a specialist near me that would do it for $100, probably more like double that?

Sounds a bit tricky to dismantle though so I'll check local suspension shops.

If I take the forks off and take them to a shop in the car, will they leak if laid flat, do they need keeping upright when serviced or does the oil all settle back again?

Is there any particular servicing required for the rear shock or is that to be considered a 'disposable' item?

:)
 

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DukeDesmo said:
Thanks for the replies, not sure what to do now - doubt I can find a specialist near me that would do it for $100, probably more like double that?

Sounds a bit tricky to dismantle though so I'll check local suspension shops.

If I take the forks off and take them to a shop in the car, will they leak if laid flat, do they need keeping upright when serviced or does the oil all settle back again?

Is there any particular servicing required for the rear shock or is that to be considered a 'disposable' item?

:)

There rear shock is 100% serviceable, but for the home mechanic I wouldn't recommend doing anything more than changing the spring. The internals are under pressure, something like 200PSI of Nitrogen. On that note, my 5 year old 996 only had 50PSI of Nitrogen left in it. He said it was normal over that amount of time, so I'll try to get it service every 24 months now.
 

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IMO 20K miles is too long to wait to change the oil, 12K is the interval I use. I think the forks should be stripped down, thoroughly cleaned and a new set of seals installed. Make sure you have somone who knows what they are doing do that work. A lot of guys do better work at home than some shops do. The spring compresser and seal driver are the minimum tools you need. I have seen clever home made solutions for these. We would get about $135 to do that job. That includes the seals and fork oil.

The forks should not leak in any position.
 

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NCRick said:
IMO 20K miles is too long to wait to change the oil, 12K is the interval I use. I think the forks should be stripped down, thoroughly cleaned and a new set of seals installed. Make sure you have somone who knows what they are doing do that work. A lot of guys do better work at home than some shops do. The spring compresser and seal driver are the minimum tools you need. I have seen clever home made solutions for these. We would get about $135 to do that job. That includes the seals and fork oil.

The forks should not leak in any position.
I agree. Most motorcycle shops are not in the suspension business and wouldn't do as good of a job as a suspension specific shop. Plus the independant shop is probably cheaper per job/hour than a dealership.
 
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