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I was reading sbout chain tensioning, and there is some mixed thoughts on the matter. Some say to measure pulling the chain downward, then upward, to check the tension. My "trusty" Haynes manual says it should be 25mm from the bottom of the swingarm. Haynes also states to place the motorcycle in a position where the tension is at the bottom of the swingarm (with the bottom of the chain as the loaded portion, while others are stating to place it with the loaded portion up top.
So which is right? The last thing I want to do is damage the trans, so I will likely set it up a bit on the loose side. Right now, I have around 1" (approx. 26mm) of travel with the bottom of the chain unloaded, lifting up and pulling down slightly.
 

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you're overthinking it. your chain slack (never understood why it's called 'tensioning the chain') is good. ride it.
 

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Are you saying 1/2 inch up and then 1/2 inch down from center? If so, and its in the tight spot of chain, yes sir you are fine.

Some guys like more play, some guys like it tighter. (Someone please follow my lead and insert joke here!)

I go 1/2 to 5/8th above and below center of the tight spot on bottom of swingarm.
 

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What you are looking for is that the chain doesn't bind when the rear axle, swing arm pivot, and countershaft sprocket are all aligned. That happens when the suspension is mostly compressed.

So to get a fool proof answer, make a couple of big folks sit on the bike while you check the chain. Does it go completely tight? Then it needs more slack. Once you have it adjusted so that it still has a tiny bit of slack in this position, and therefore won't interfere with the rear suspension, make them get off the bike and note how much slack the chain has now. That's the value you are shooting for in the future. Note, chains can stretch unevenly so make sure to measure the tightest spot.
 
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