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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi guys im at 23000k on my multi and chain is pretty much shot!
Those of you that have swapped what did u use? Regina RK EK DID??
Any store you guys would recomend? I currently use a 14T front sprocket and 40T rear. Going to go 15T (stock) front and 42 Rear this time.

Thanks for all the help.
 

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Each of the brands you've named are good quality products. I, personally, use EK and have nothing but good things to say about them.

If you're not familiar with Gearing Commander, check it out. http://gearingcommander.com/

It takes a little bit of fiddling to understand how the site works, but it's a fun and informative tool.
 

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^^ Same as above, changed out my first factory sprocket and chain at 20,000kms, got a DID chain and sprockets from Sprocket Centre. That chain did 50,000kms, it was still in good condition, but i brought another sprocket set and DID chain again from the same place, i thought 50K was good milage, so changed it anyway.
 

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I have the exact setup you are talking about. The 15t front and 42t rear from supersprox and the RK Chain. One thing I am going to change is add 1 more link to the chain. I used the same length chain as stock(108 links). This has made by wheelbase shorter and I find that under hard riding the bike is a touch unstable after 200km/h. I did not have this problem earlier. Gearingcommander.com gives you all the details, including the length between the sprockets as you make changes such as adding teeth or adding links.
 

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I've used RK and DID... both work well. I've tended to go for DID Gold lately for the bling. :)
 

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I have the exact setup you are talking about. The 15t front and 42t rear from supersprox and the RK Chain. One thing I am going to change is add 1 more link to the chain. I used the same length chain as stock(108 links). This has made by wheelbase shorter and I find that under hard riding the bike is a touch unstable after 200km/h. I did not have this problem earlier. Gearingcommander.com gives you all the details, including the length between the sprockets as you make changes such as adding teeth or adding links.
I liked the slightly shorter wheel base, i raised the forks through the triple clamp an extra 5mm to compensate, gave me back the rock solid Ducati front end, and helped with the headlights pointing too high.
 

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I liked the slightly shorter wheel base, i raised the forks through the triple clamp an extra 5mm to compensate, gave me back the rock solid Ducati front end, and helped with the headlights pointing too high.


I raised the forks 1 line on the 2016 DVT. there were only three lines and I moved to the center line from the top. Do you recommend raising the forks another line?
 

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I raised the forks 1 line on the 2016 DVT. there were only three lines and I moved to the center line from the top. Do you recommend raising the forks another line?
If you're happy with the handling, id leave it there. My Multi is a 2010, i have 15mm of fork protruding through the top clamp. i can't remember what stock was, but after fitting the larger sprocket i cut the new chain to the length of the original chain, which shortened the wheel base by around one link length. I lowered the front more to suit the settings i was running in sport mode, i just wanted a little more weight over the front to give me that confidence on the throttle mid corner exiting. The Multi squats quite considerably gassing out of corners, so that small change helped, plus the heavier rear spring and getting the sag numbers in the right direction, many things effect the the handling, but these Multis are a very forgiving bike to ride.
 

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It adds to the Italian-ness

I'm a long time fan of Regina chains, Italian bike - Italian chain; bella!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I have had no luck with Regina chains in all my bikes, my GS800 had Regina and lasted 20000km changed to DID it went on to 45000km on that chain. Now the multi same thing 22.000km and chain is completely gone sprockets actually still seam ok but i dont want to waste a new chain on used parts so going to change it all. Going to buy from sprocket center Thanks everyone for the feedback. 15T - 42T and DID chain is what im getting,
 

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Hi guys im at 23000k on my multi and chain is pretty much shot!
Those of you that have swapped what did u use? Regina RK EK DID??
Any store you guys would recomend? I currently use a 14T front sprocket and 40T rear. Going to go 15T (stock) front and 42 Rear this time.

Thanks for all the help.
going from 40T to 42T made a noticable difference in driveability: pick up is amazing and low speed cruising is more doable.
But why change the front sprocket as well?

Downside is that the fuel consumption was as noticable as the driveability!
So much that I will go down one teeth by my next Desmo service.

I'd imagine chaning the rear and front sprocket the feel will be more noticeable, but so will your fuel consumption.

Or is going up one teeth at the front meant for compensating the two up at the rear?
why not go up one teeth that the rear than?

Not sure what the effect of changing the front sprocket is here, noob. :)
One up rear is comparable with one down front for example?
 

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I have had no luck with Regina chains in all my bikes, my GS800 had Regina and lasted 20000km changed to DID it went on to 45000km on that chain. Now the multi same thing 22.000km and chain is completely gone sprockets actually still seam ok but i dont want to waste a new chain on used parts so going to change it all. Going to buy from sprocket center Thanks everyone for the feedback. 15T - 42T and DID chain is what im getting,


Good choice.

My 2012 has always had 15/42 since I bought it used and I can’t imagine it going 15/40. Would kind of like a 15/43...


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
going from 40T to 42T made a noticable difference in driveability: pick up is amazing and low speed cruising is more doable.
But why change the front sprocket as well?

Downside is that the fuel consumption was as noticable as the driveability!
So much that I will go down one teeth by my next Desmo service.

I'd imagine chaning the rear and front sprocket the feel will be more noticeable, but so will your fuel consumption.

Or is going up one teeth at the front meant for compensating the two up at the rear?
why not go up one teeth that the rear than?

Not sure what the effect of changing the front sprocket is here, noob. :)
One up rear is comparable with one down front for example?


Im not changing the front on my next setup, going to stock 15T front and bumping up to 42 at back.

Right now im running 14T front and 40T back. it is aslmost the same as having a 43back when you go down 1T in the front. if that makes sence

If you go Up a tooth you will make the bike have more final drive and less torque and force which doesnt make sence for me sence the Multi is fast enough at top end and lacks a little low end for city cruising.


The effect of changing front is the same as changing back. Exemple 1 tooth in the front sprocket down is the same as going up 3 in the back, only cheeper to do so. so by running what i do today 14-40 is almost the same as 15-42. 15-42 is in the middel of my current set up and stock if that makes sence.
 

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I just changed my chain and sprockets last week on my 2016 MTS 1200s. I got a solid 19,000 miles out of the original chain but recently noticed some binding on the links.

I replaced the front sprocket with another stock sprocket but put a 42 tooth sprocket on the rear. As others have noted, this produced a major improvement in the bike's performance. The bike accelerates far more quickly off the line and moves with more agility when you twist the throttle. Between moving from standstill and about 70 mph, everything is better (and more fun!). You do run through the low gears a bit more quickly because they produce higher revs than before. But the bike feels great between 3rd and 6th gear, with a wide operating range.

I haven't noticed a material impact on fuel economy yet. For the most part, at cruising speeds you're running at the same RPMs but just using a higher gear, so I doubt there's any impact on fuel consumption. When riding at higher speeds in 6th gear (> 75) you'll generate higher RPMs than with the stock gearing, so mileage will take a hit. My preliminary assessment based on about a week of riding is I'm getting about 1 MPG less with the new setup on my daily commute, which is primarily high-speed freeway.

The big bonus is the MTS feels like a brand new bike. As much fun as it used to be, it's much more fun now.

For those who haven't taken the deep dive, be aware that you can buy a "quick change" rear sprocket assembly. It costs a bit more but it's much less expensive to swap the rear sprocket when you put on a new chain or want to change the gearing. For me it was a safety net in case I wanted to go back to stock gearing. Another tip for the uninformed: The best time to change your gearing is when you need to replace your chain or it's starting to wear out. You should replace the front/rear sprockets when you replace your chain, so this is an ideal time to try a new rear sprocket.

I didn't make any adjustment to the forks and didn't notice a shorter wheel base. Maybe that's because I had the dealer do the work. I assume they fit the chain to the sprockets so it wouldn't affect the wheel base or forks. The shop charged about $145 for labor on the front/rear sprockets and chain (plus the cost of parts). Good deal as far as I'm concerned.
 
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