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Hello All :smile2:

Do you guys know if the "old" Castrol Chain Wax is replaced with either Castrol Chain Lube Racing or Castrol Chain Spray O-R?

I can not find information about what type the Castrol Chain Lube Racing or Castrol Chain Spray O-R are. Are they wax or oil???

Hmmmmmmmm :confused:

Happy new year

Moller

 

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:abduct: Yes! A Chain Lube Thread! And just when it was really beginning to get slow 'round here...good timing!!

You are about to read: "No chain lube at all", "WD40 FTW", and "it's all the same crap, as long as you're using something", followed by "I got a million miles out of my last chain and sprockets using "X" (this one probably by DavyJ), and Rex is going to tell us about his organ. Yes, that one. :eek:
 

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Retired Pipe Polisher C2H6O+
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I read somewhere that which direction you spin the tire while lubing it makes all the difference in world!


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I've been using Dupont Chain Saver wax based spray.
Waaaay less mess than the PJ1 stuff I had been using.
Does not attract grime and black crud like PJ1 or oil does.
 

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Retired Pipe Polisher C2H6O+
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The DuPont stuff makes everything else look stupid. I like the little squirt bottles best rather than the spray.


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I need to put in my 2 cents. Don't use Klotz chain lube. It clogs within the can and you won't be able to use the entire can. I'll never buy it again.
 

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The DuPont stuff makes everything else look stupid. I like the little squirt bottles best rather than the spray.
But the little spray tube is great. It never wants to stay stuck in the nozzle, so you always end up spraying it where you did not want when the tube falls off. Just point away from your face. :laugh:
 

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Interesting article regarding chains .... lube, types, etc.

LINK = https://www.motorcycle.com/products/all-about-chains-3524.html

One portion of the article regarding chain lube types is especially interesting (granted the article is 21 years old, some info is probably outdated) .... here's a quote;

"To my surprise, Mr. Longoni claims that heavy gear oil applied with a brush is what many racing teams use, but this is a messy proposition and best only when the chain can be left to drip away the excess overnight. Most people spray on chain lube, which is good as long as you wait the required 20 minutes to let the solvents in the spray evaporate and leave the thicker lubricant on the chain, rather than on of the tire's sidewall.
Chain grease is not so efficient. It cannot get into the tight clearances between moving parts and the most good it can ever do is keep the chain's side plates from rusting in the winter.
Chain oil's main enemy is high running temperatures. The running temperature of a chain ideally should not exceed 160 degrees Fahrenheit (70 degrees Celsius). Above that, chain lubricant starts to thin, and the chances of it seeping out past the O-rings increase; eventually the film strength drops."

Looks like "chain wax" types (or greases) aren't the best choice, other than keeping the chain's side from rusting during wet season. Then again, that was then, this is now.

In the '70s, I used to remove the chain and clean it in gasoline (in a coffee can). I'd let it drip dry by hanging it over the can. I'd heat up graphite grease in an old cooking pot until it was in a thinner fluid state, soak the chain in the heated thinned grease, then hang the chain and allow the hot/thinned grease to drip from the chain. Once cooled, I'd wipe any other excess off, and install it on the bike. Worked great for long desert rides/races (200 miles or so) and enduros. I also did that the day before Saturday night MX races. Gotta remember back then there weren't high tech chain lubes in aerosol cans. Well, there were, but most weren't worth a damn. And o-ring chains had yet to be produced. So it was either 30wt in an oil pump dispenser, or come up with your own home brew. My home brew beat nothin' I suppose.
 

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Interesting article regarding chains .... lube, types, etc.

LINK = https://www.motorcycle.com/products/all-about-chains-3524.html

One portion of the article regarding chain lube types is especially interesting (granted the article is 21 years old, some info is probably outdated) .... here's a quote;

"To my surprise, Mr. Longoni claims that heavy gear oil applied with a brush is what many racing teams use, but this is a messy proposition and best only when the chain can be left to drip away the excess overnight.
When I was a broke as hell grad student nursing an old bandit 1200 as primary transportation, I found a old bottle of 90W gear oil on the shelf in my slumlord's garage. Used that as lube after a WD-40 wipe off/clean and got 30K out of a stock Suzuki chain. Applied to a warm chain and wiped off excess. Worked really well I guess.

Now I do the Motul chain paste after a wipe off with wd. The MTS sits at 18K miles and there's no significant wear or measurable slop in the OEM chain. It's nice ss swingarms keep chains running true all the time. That helps wear too.
 

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Ok. True story here. I have a fren that lives up the street. He used to have one of the first Eddy Lawson replica Kawis. He commuted every day on it rain or shine. He was also a mechanic for one the trucking companies and worked on 18 wheelers. All he used to use on his chain was some hypoid type rear end oil he could get for free at work. His bike was always a nasty oily, stinky mess but get this. I know for a fact cause I saw it, the original chain and sprockets went 55,000 miles. I shit you not. :)


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Ok. True story here. I have a fren that lives up the street. He used to have one of the first Eddy Lawson replica Kawis. He commuted every day on it rain or shine. He was also a mechanic for one the trucking companies and worked on 18 wheelers. All he used to use on his chain was some hypoid type rear end oil he could get for free at work. His bike was always a nasty oily, stinky mess but get this. I know for a fact cause I saw it, the original chain and sprockets went 55,000 miles. I shit you not. :)


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Taking into account how robust these chains are, it's not out of the realm of possibility at all. The 30K mile chain I had wasn't done, it was just sacrificed as a part of the tires/chain/tune process I went through at the time. Much like motor oil, we swap out stuff that a person in an underdeveloped country would use 10X over. My example is loggers filtering their used vehicle oil for chain oil. Talk about stinky messes, it was gnarly. But down the trees came.
 
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