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The way to correctly to lubricate a motorcycle chain was perfectly described by @Dukerdr in 2014. If you not using a Q-tip and refined whale oil, you're doing it wrong.

/thread

I like to take mine off and scrub it really good once a month.

After I'm convinced it's clean, I hang it up on a nail and gently coat each roller with a Q-tip soaked in refined whale oil. O-rings last longer this way.

4 times a year I use the bench mounted buffer to polish the side plates before reoiling.

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Hey, I had a bike with a chrome chain on it once - my KTM 990 SMT. I didn't know it had a chrome chain when I bought it, I thought it was flat black. I thought the sprocket and entire rear half of the bike was flat black, actually. When I finally de-gunked the poor thing I discovered the shiny chain. The P.O. was a big fan of lubing the chain, obviously. I pulled the swingarm and soaked the chain in kerosene, and cleaned everything else with kerosene and brakecleen.

I never lubed that chain...it was too pretty. Plus it was chrome...it ain't gonna rust!
 

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The way to correctly to lubricate a motorcycle chain was perfectly described by @Dukerdr in 2014. If you not using a Q-tip and refined whale oil, you're doing it wrong.
/thread
I like to take mine off and scrub it really good once a month.

After I'm convinced it's clean, I hang it up on a nail and gently coat each roller with a Q-tip soaked in refined whale oil. O-rings last longer this way.

4 times a year I use the bench mounted buffer to polish the side plates before reoiling.
Priceless.
 

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Personally I only clean my chain when it visibly needs it and I only lube/wax it after riding in wet conditions.
 

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For many years prior to my Multi, I was blessed with both shaft drive and belt drive. However, as a young man, I rode primarily motocross and enduro bikes of the early 80's. I remember not having access to all kinds of fancy cleaners and/ or lubricants. Needless to say, as a teenager, I also did not have the funds for the expensive stuff at the local motorcycle shop.
Today, I use a system that has yet to fail. I park the bike on a large piece of cardboard and remove the front sprocket cover. Just using straight kerosene in a spray bottle cleans everything off perfectly. I use a nylon bristle engine cleaning brush. Every time I do it, I am amazed how much road grime it picks up.
I simply lube with Motul chain and cable lubricant. The Kerosene seems to be far less invasive to surrounding parts and makes it clean as can be.
 

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I'll never have to clean my chain again. Ever.
All I have to do is keep it clean which only takes a minute or two.
As for lube: We've been conditioned through mis-information that we have to lube a sealed chain. We don't. It's already lubed. We only have to keep it from rusting.
Nothing but a rag wipe containing a a bit of motor oil is required. Anything more is a magnet for road grime. We have to move past the dark ages.
This is how It always looks. In fact, it looks better than shown most of the time.
Screenshot from 2020-05-04 16:23:40.png
 

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I'll never have to clean my chain again. Ever.

snip
The sealed and 'almost' permanently lubricated part of a sealed chain only have to take a slight bending and straightening motion. The rollers, which are not permanently lubricated, are the business part of the chain. They take the full force and have to rotate around the pin while taking this force. They also rub on the sprocket more and more as the sprocket wears out. They need the best lubrication you can provide. No chain on any bike that actually gets ridden, I mean really ridden, looks like the one pictured. You can go on and on with your theories but it simply won't change these facts.
 

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No chain on any bike that actually gets ridden, I mean really ridden, looks like the one pictured. You can go on and on with your theories but it simply won't change these facts.
Mine does. I have put over 16,000 kms last year with two bikes. The Multi had 9000 kms of those.
BTW, You have taken my words out of context. I don't clean it because I keep it clean and "It's always clean". I do keep it lubricated but only sparingly and not showered. Please read the whole thread with videos from experts.
 

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The sealed and 'almost' permanently lubricated part of a sealed chain only have to take a slight bending and straightening motion. The rollers, which are not permanently lubricated, are the business part of the chain. They take the full force and have to rotate around the pin while taking this force. They also rub on the sprocket more and more as the sprocket wears out. They need the best lubrication you can provide. No chain on any bike that actually gets ridden, I mean really ridden, looks like the one pictured. You can go on and on with your theories but it simply won't change these facts.
Well darn. Here we go with facts again. :)

No Tamworth, it’s the pins and bushings that take all the load on the chain. The reason why o-ring chains last so much longer is those areas are always lubed with hi pressure resistant grease. The rollers don’t do much of anything except protect the outer surface of the bushings when it’s actually in contact with the sprocket. Even with minimal light oil the rollers never wear out. The wear in the pins and bushings is what causes the chain to elongate. By the way chains don’t “stretch”.


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When referring to chains people have wrongly thought the chains elongated because the side plates would “stretch”. What’s actually happening is the bushing are wearing which causes more gap between them and the pins. The chain gets longer but nothing has “stretched”.


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...and road grime composed of sand, salt, acids and other nefarious contaminants acts to prematurely erode the chain.
Not cleaning your chain is akin to not doing your dishes after each meal. The mess piles-up and the junk get's harder to clean. Eventually, It becomes a really big job.
 

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Well darn. Here we go with facts again. :)

No Tamworth, it’s the pins and bushings that take all the load on the chain. The reason why o-ring chains last so much longer is those areas are always lubed with hi pressure resistant grease. The rollers don’t do much of anything except protect the outer surface of the bushings when it’s actually in contact with the sprocket. Even with minimal light oil the rollers never wear out. The wear in the pins and bushings is what causes the chain to elongate. By the way chains don’t “stretch”.


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Correct but the rollers, when they are in contact with the sprocket, still have as much pressure between them and the bushing as every other part of the chain. In a perfect world they would not rotate at all but they do scrub against the bushing as they come into the sprocket seat, and slightly more as the sprocket wears.You do need some small amount lube between roller and bushing and between roller and sprocket for a chain to operate smoothly. Dar specifically states that a sealed chain needs absolutely no other lubricant other than a slightly oil damped cloth to prevent surface rust, and that to not believe this is being mis-informed. He then backtracked on that with the claim " I do keep it lubricated but only sparingly and not showered. " which is more in line with reality
 

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The only time mine gets a little gunkie is when I’m on long trips. Like a week or two and 3-5k miles. I’ll put on some of the lube I carry every couple of days or at the end of every rain day.

When I get home it gets a real bath with kerosene or diesel, washed, WD40’d, blow dry, and lubed.




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When referring to chains people have wrongly thought the chains elongated because the side plates would “stretch”. What’s actually happening is the bushing are wearing which causes more gap between them and the pins. The chain gets longer but nothing has “stretched”.


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Agreed, and the pins themselves wear equally which can easily be seen whenever one pulls a link out. It's the elongated chain that wears the sprockets as there become less sprocket teeth involved in pulling the chain
 
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