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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
i am gonna give the regear a try on my 749. i am going with afam steel sprockets, because i dont like the wear factor on an alum rear sprocket.
but what should i be looking at for a chain? brand and length? was leaning towards the DID erv3, not sure on the length i need to go 14/42.
also wondering how the hell am i suppose to crimp the master link without buying the $120 tool?
feel stupid asking but, do i just need f/r sprockets & chain to go 520? or is there something else in these "conversion kits"
 

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You can use a hammer and a sharp punch to flare the master link. I did 5000 miles ago on my 748.
 

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I would buy the tool if you want to be sure about doing it right. 100 links is what you need on the chain. You don't need anything besides the two sprockets, chain, and some chain lube.
 

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i am gonna give the regear a try on my 749. i am going with afam steel sprockets, because i dont like the wear factor on an alum rear sprocket.
but what should i be looking at for a chain? brand and length? was leaning towards the DID erv3, not sure on the length i need to go 14/42.
also wondering how the hell am i suppose to crimp the master link without buying the $120 tool?
feel stupid asking but, do i just need f/r sprockets & chain to go 520? or is there something else in these "conversion kits"
I've used an EK Chain before, which has a "screw master link", which gets installed without an 120 tool.

I got mine from CA CycleWorks.
http://www.ca-cycleworks.com/shop/catalog/ducati/chain.html

the chains come in 120 links - I'd bet you would have plenty of links to fit 14/42 since the default chain looks like it uses 98 links for stock gearing.
 

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If it's not a track-bike just use the clip-link master. In 40 years of riding, I've never heard of one failing if you put it on so the open end follows. You can safety-wire it if you are really paranoid.
 

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You can use a hammer and a sharp punch to flare the master link. I did 5000 miles ago on my 748.
I could see that working just fine, as long as you could keep the side plates pressed together evenly, so as not to rivet it with uneven pressure. Did you wedge a block of wood behind the chain to keep it steady.

It's not the ideal method, but neither was my method of grinding off 3 front sprocket teeth to swap a 15 for a 14, instead of breaking the chain. ha ha ha
 

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hmm... can i use a clip type on any chain? if i get the erv3 can i get a clip master l;ink separately? can u cut the chain to length just with a dremel or will i screw up the seals?
I would get a manufacturer specific link, which will contain new o-rings. It's easiest to grind the rivet heads off of the side plate and pry it apart, I've done it w/o a chain breaker. Takes a little bit more effort, but it can be done. If you do decide to buy a chain breaker/ riveter, check ebay and they will last a lifetime...
 

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If you dont like the alloy wearing try supersprox. Steel outer & alloy inner PLUS if you buy the full set you get a lifetime guarantee.
I fiitted a rear to the T9 & it looks the dog danglys
 

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ERV3 is complete overkill for the street, and I wouldn't use a clip link on that chain even if there is one...which I'm pretty darn sure there's not. Do yourself a huge favor...buy the tool, period! Or get a clip type master link. Don't do a half ass job. If your a DiD fan, the newer ZVM2 chain is the best chain you can get for the street. Super strong, and will last a loooong time, and much cheaper than the ERV. But, that ERV sure s pretty.
 

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I'd been using clip-link masters for years until I broke down and bought the DID chain tool, you can break the chain and use rivet links with this tool. Grinding on a chain is problematic in that if the metal gets too hot it can melt the o-rings, liquify the lube in the bearings.

Get the tool, do it right, you'll have the tool forever as it's well made.

Chris
 
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