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i have 1998 st2, the owner manual and various threads say make the chain adjustment while the bike is on the center stand. i am curious why the instructions on the left side of the swing arm state the adjustment is made while on the side stand. i downloaded the workshop manual but the page on chain adjustment is missing. so which is is correct, i used the center stand method which might be to tight on the side stand.
 

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I can't see why it would make a difference so I would say go on the center stand.....BTW where did you download the workshop manual?
 

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I'm not certain if the side stand or center stand is the Ducati recommended method for a '98 ST2 (I'll need to find out shortly, though, so hopefully somebody who knows replies!). It does make a difference, though, as on the center stand the rear wheel will be as low as it can go unless the ride height has been significantly altered. On the side stand the rear wheel will be higher in it's path of travel as it will be supporting the weight of the bike.
 

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I went to my first track day this weekend and ran into this issue. The tech inpect guy mentioned my chain was a bit tight. I told him it says 25mm, and I had set it to 30. His first question was "on the kickstand or on a rear stand?". I told him on the rear stand. He said to do it on the sidestand because...(couldn't hear him too well, but something about suspension travel).

Seems like the gravitation forces would be the same supported from the swingarm or bottom of the wheel in relation to the suspension travel at the time, but I guess I am missing something. Maybe he said to be sitting on it and have someone measure it as that would affect travel.
 

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It can make a HUGE difference if you adjust your chain on the center stand as apposed to the side stand, especially if the rear ride height of the bike has been raised! Be careful!

If the rear ride height has been raised, the swing arm will be slopped much more to the rear when on the center stand and the rear wheel will be almost touching, if not actually touching the ground. If you adjust the chain to the recommended tension in this position, it will be WAY too tight when the bike is off the stand and you are sitting on it! So tight that you will be putting tremendous torque on the drive shaft bearings and the rear suspension won't be able to articulate because the swingarm won't be able to travel upwards beyond its' horizontal plane!

With the bike on the side stand, there is some load on the wheel and the swingarm will be more horizontal. Adjusting the chain in this position will be a LOT more accurate but it may still be too tight once you sit on the bike if the rear ride height is raised a lot.

My rear ride height is raised and I adjust my chain on the center stand, BUT, I adjust it so that it is lightly slapping the swingarm where the adjustment sticker is affixed. It appears way too loose on the center stand, but once back on the ground with me sitting on it, the chain is tighter and within specifications.

I always check the chain after I've adjusted it with me sitting on the bike. I carefully reach down and test the tension at the sticker. If there's no slack, I get off and loosen it some more. If it slaps the swingarm, I've loosened it too much. It's pretty easy to judge that the chain has the proper slack with a one finger test from on the bike.

Once you have the chain adjusted correctly for when you're sat on the bike, it's a good idea to put it back on the center stand and then measure how much slack the chain has while on the stand. That way, next time, you know how much to adjust the chain while on the stand. :D

Remember, it's much better to have a slightly loose chain than a tight one. A tight chain puts a heck of a lot of strain on the drive shaft bearing and can cause it to fail over time!
 

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It can make a HUGE difference if you adjust
I always check the chain after I've adjusted it with me sitting on the bike. I carefully reach down and test the tension at the sticker. If there's no slack, I get off and loosen it some more. If it slaps the swingarm, I've loosened it too much. It's pretty easy to judge that the chain has the proper slack with a one finger test from on the bike.


Remember, it's much better to have a slightly loose chain than a tight one. A tight chain puts a heck of a lot of strain on the drive shaft bearing and can cause it to fail over time!
That's exactly how I do mine, you have to check it with your full weight on the bike or usually it will be too tight.
 

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Mr Leakered
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One more important bit after adjusting the chain on an ST with a raised rear is to go out and ride it. If you are feeling a ton of slack being taken up when going on and off throttle, then you might want to tweak it again or have another look.

Also, be aware that chains that have been in use for a while with have tighter spots. So, be sure to check at least three different locations to determine the tightest area.

Have a good one.
 
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