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Discussion Starter #41 (Edited)
So my compression tester finally got here.

On a cold engine with a few ml of oil squirted into the cylinders, I measure
150psi on the horizontal (which has the oily plug) and ~142ish on the vertical.

The pistons are "11:1" FBF, but I won't read too much into the absolute numbers. The gauge isnt calibrated, and I have no idea what my squish, and therefore actual compression is.
5% difference between cylinders on also doesn't sound too bad to me.


Anyway, I will continue to fix all the peripherals and have a good look at the oil as well. Waiting for a bunch of carb parts right now.
 

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Discussion Starter #42
Also I finally tested my ignition. Everything works when cranking in the dry shed at least, nothing suspicious with the leads or coils. My igniter boxes are different though - one is a real Kokusan, the other an identical looking thing with some very minor differences and no sticker. Aftermarket or just a different generation?



Either way since I wanted to mess with the timing anyways I now have an ignitech :smile2:
 

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I have seen more aftermarket boxes that did NOT work than have worked. It has been common that the boxes have a lower rev limit and simply cut out sooner than they should which makes me think they are not made for the ducati's but have a similar build and people are selling them for the Ducati's... or maybe they are just crap. The Ignitech units are the exception, there were a few issues when they first came out but seem to be good to go for a bunch of years now.
 

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Discussion Starter #44 (Edited)
so, finally I can update this. After Canadian customs held all my parts hostage for the better part of 6 weeks, I was finally able to re-assemble everything this week and put some miles on the bike today.

Since my ill-fated test ride in January, I changed the following:

- Carbs de-sanded, and fully rebuilt with new seals all around. The previous owner claimed that he re-sealed the carbs "last year", but in direct comparison those seals seemed pretty old and hard compared to new ones.

- New intake manifold rubbers. I'm not sure if I had an intake leak beforehand, but it is possible.

- Ignitech TCIP4 ignition to replace the questionable Kokusan/Aftermarket units. Running 4000-32 map for now. New plugs as well.

- Stock airfilter. It turns out that the thickness of the aftermarket filter was not really the cause for the loose airbox lid. Instead I now think that the airbox clamps that came with the bike were not right. The P.O. really had a talent for installing wrong parts the wrong way. My lid and filter is now held in place with two strong velcro straps instead of clamps.

- Pulled the front head off again, and changed valve seals on the front cylinder, which fixed the oily plug and oil consumption. No idea why I didn't do both cylinders when I had the motor out, but at least so far the rear seals aren't leaking. While I had the head off I also got a look at the cylinder bore, and confirmed that there is no damage from the sand ingestion.

- Rebuilt the front brake calipers with new seals. Before January, I had only flushed them with new fluid. New seals made a big difference though, brakes have a way better bite point now and less drag.

- Since I have a replacement R/R that doesn't trigger the charge warning (battery) light, I installed a charge warning light system from improvingclassicmotorcycles.com. This little $20 box measures how the system voltage changes over time, and triggers the battery light, when it thinks the battery is discharging. It works perfectly. Highly recommended.

- Motobatt AGM battery to replace the really old Yuasa that came with the bike.

- Re-wired the head lights on a separate 10AWG circuit and relais. Also cleaned out the head light reflector itself. Huge improvement.




So finally this bike is running like (I think) it should. With 15/39 final drive, it lifts the front wheel in first and second gear. I think I am still a bit too lean at full throttle - it is possible that the P.O. put in the smaller #130 main jets in an attempt to fix a rich condition, which was actually caused by faulty internal carb seals. Now with the fixed carbs here at sea level, it is definitely on the lean side wide open. I will try a #140 or #145.

The Ignitech box is a HUGE improvement. It is an absolute must for high compression engines IMO. It has not only stopped the pings I was occasionally getting, it totally transformed throttle response off idle. The bike now pulls clean from 3000 RPM without complaints. Also, the choke is way less touchy now - on the stock boxes with the aggressive timing ramp, it was acting like an on-off switch.

One new problem that has developed is clutch slippage... figures, since the previous owner installed this clutch as well...
 

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- Since I have a replacement R/R that doesn't trigger the charge warning (battery) light, I installed a charge warning light system from improvingclassicmotorcycles.com. This little $20 box measures how the system voltage changes over time, and triggers the battery light, when it thinks the battery is discharging. It works perfectly. Highly recommended.
How did you install this? Did you use the kit that reuses the lamp in the instrument panel, replace the bulb in the instrument panel with the LED, or add it as an additional light somewhere on the panel?
 

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Discussion Starter #46
How did you install this? Did you use the kit that reuses the lamp in the instrument panel, replace the bulb in the instrument panel with the LED, or add it as an additional light somewhere on the panel?

It's the standard "negative earth CWL" from the website.. It connects to any switched +12V anywhere under the dash to measure voltage, and you solder it to the lead for the stock charge warning light. Which is the red and white cable coming out of the plug for all the warning lights. The box is half the size of a match box and tucks in anywhere.

He has kits with their own LED as well, but since the SS has a battery warning this is the slickest solution.
 

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- Re-wired the head lights on a separate 10AWG circuit and relais. Also cleaned out the head light reflector itself. Huge improvement.

Lots of work! Good for you as it sounds you really love your machine and is serious about sorting her out!

When I broke and removed the headlight bulb shield, or top hat or whatever people call that thing my field of vision went up by a magnitude. Seems like it is pot metal. I just broke it with needle nose pliers and pulled the pieces out then soap washed the internals like you did. Not sure if your model has that thing in there, thought I would put that out tho anyway.

You have a great thread - lots of good info keep it up!
 

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Lots of work! Good for you as it sounds you really love your machine and is serious about sorting her out!

When I broke and removed the headlight bulb shield, or top hat or whatever people call that thing my field of vision went up by a magnitude. Seems like it is pot metal. I just broke it with needle nose pliers and pulled the pieces out then soap washed the internals like you did. Not sure if your model has that thing in there, thought I would put that out tho anyway.

You have a great thread - lots of good info keep it up!
I Had a similar result with mine also. My headlight had a white film on the inside of the glass lens (from new - it was a replacement) - but with that shroud in place, I couldn't get at the glass properly to clean it. I used a Dremel tool to cut the legs of the shroud - but it came out easily enough, and yeah - better light output, particularly after a proper clean (streak free glass cleaner on a paper towel, mopped around the inside of the light with a chopstick).
 

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Discussion Starter #50
interesting. My headlight is actually pretty decent now, with a modern light bulb in it. If you break the bulb shield, wouldn't that change how the high beam / low beam split works? More light is always good, but I also don't want to blind oncoming traffic
 

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interesting. My headlight is actually pretty decent now, with a modern light bulb in it. If you break the bulb shield, wouldn't that change how the high beam / low beam split works? More light is always good, but I also don't want to blind oncoming traffic
The H4's from those years were full clear glass on the bulb - now they all have that frontal black-out coating on them which negates that top hat thingy - I am not blinding anybody on low beams, but I do see better with the top hat removed.
 

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Discussion Starter #53
as suspected...

This explains why the clutch slips. My clutch pack stack height is only 35mm. The friction plates are all about 2.9-3.0mm and therefore near new, but all the steel plates are the thinner 1.5mm type (9 steel plates x 1.5 = 13.5mm, 7 friction discs x 3mm = 21mm for a total of 34.5mm, when it should be 38mm).

I'm not sure what's going on here, but obviously someone installed a mix of parts that doesn't work.

Should I try to find a stack of 2mm steel plates? Or would it be worth trying to insert an 8th friction plate in between the double-stacked steel plates at the bottom of the stack, to get to 38mm total?
 

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This would be the time to try the 'Quiet Clutch Mod'.
I've done it myself on the ST4S and my Gran Canyon; worked well both times. I also sprayed the plates with white grease and found the take up to be smooth as silk and with no clutch slip. Information on both came from posts I found on this forum.
 

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Discussion Starter #57
Thanks. It's all OEM Ducati stuff from what I can tell, but given all the other stuff I found on this bike, I suspect it could be a collection of parts from different bikes. All the steel plates are 1.5mm, but none are cupped. The friction discs are steel and look like OEM to me. Clutch basket and hub are OEM, no slipper or anything. The hydraulic slave is an aftermarket CNC unit, maybe Oberon.

The clutch bites very late (lever most of the way out). It doesn't screech and I wouldn't call it grabby, but it slips in 4-6th gear at full throttle.


Ducati will neither sell me individual friction discs, nor a pack of steel plates. Off to ebay again, I guess.
 

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Discussion Starter #59
Ah, didn't think of that!
I just found a used complete set of steel plates from a 2005 Monster on ebay that should hopefully have the cupped plate in there. Also getting a single OEM friction plate. So that should give me a few options to make this clutch work properly.

Marocco4speed is a pretty handy shop as well, that's where I got the gasket set for my motor.
 

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Probably not the fact the plates are worn as much as the 1.5mm plates should be 2.0mm plates. In a oem pack you only have the two 1.5mm and one is cupped. Be sure to look for a punch mark to find the cupped plate it is subtle. It sounds more like a Barnett or other aftermarket. any chance we could get a picture?

Either way as others have said fattening up the pack will probably fix you up, see if anyone near you has a old oem pack and swap a couple 1.5's for 2.0's.
 
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