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I still have the stock rear CF hugger from my 1993 Superlight. Don’t remember how it survived the crash that totaled the rest of the bike (and me) but I digress...anyway, the CF looks very faded (I can actually see through it in certain spots). Is there a way to ‘restore’ the luster? I’d like to use this on my 1992 900SS which still has the original plastic hugger. Or am I better off buying a new rear CF hugger (if they are still made for a ‘92)?

Thanks


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..... Is there a way to ‘restore’ the luster?....
Yep, very light sand, spray with good quality clear coat, let dry, light sand and recoat. You will find a post of mine from when I redid my hugger and front guard.

Cheers.
 

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If you want it to last and look really good and be a bit stronger, you could use a thin epoxy mixture and just brush it on-let it dry then do again, and one more time. after the 3 coats sand lightly just to smooth out--then spray a coat of clear on it. this is how I coat and seal carbon bits and it works perfectly and lasts for a very long time
 

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If you want it to last and look really good and be a bit stronger, you could use a thin epoxy mixture and just brush it on-let it dry then do again, and one more time. after the 3 coats sand lightly just to smooth out--then spray a coat of clear on it. this is how I coat and seal carbon bits and it works perfectly and lasts for a very long time
So you do this as a preventative (with new parts) or to restore older one's?
 

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I do it on used parts --when they are new they look great for a while--then when they start looking bad thats when I do the epoxy treatment makes it stronger without adding much weight but it keeps looking good for longer then original
 

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I do it on used parts --when they are new they look great for a while--then when they start looking bad thats when I do the epoxy treatment makes it stronger without adding much weight but it keeps looking good for longer then original
What brand epoxy do you use?

Thanks >:)
Pete
 

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I'll have too look when I get to the shop tomorrow at what brand of epoxy I use, But I thin it out as well so it flows real easy and lays out smooth that way the final sanding is easy as well nothing big to deal with
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks! Is there any particular type of epoxy that works best?


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Those early genuine ducati carbon huggers are so thin and light that they're a real headache to restore. A lot of the time you end up with holes and dimples in the surface if you clear coat it, i wouldn't bother frankly, i've seen a lot worse than that.

what i would suggest is some elbow grease, it's not a clear coat paint on it, it's the epoxy that forms the shape with the carbon so something coarse like T-cut or meguiars medium cut would be a good start, then use something finer to get the polish up on it.

The other thing i do with mine, and don't laugh... is apply sunscreen. It stops the sun affecting the carbon which once it's been UV affected it's really hard to bring them back, they get brittle and go grey and nasty. obviously when you wash it you need to reapply it but i put it on like polish, rub it on, let it dry, buff it off, my 888 hugger is still on it from 93 and it's still looking good. I did replace it with an aftermarket one that faded badly after about 5 years, tried to reclear it and it was a disaster so i put the original back on and its still there.
 

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Thats why I coat them with thin coats of epoxy it fills any small pin holes nicely and re-seals everything gives enough of a coat to sand lightly to make it really smooth then clear coat to protect it. --I do like the sun screen idea that would also help it last
 

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OK the epoxy I use is Gougeon Brothers pro set 125 resin & their fast hardener just mix it in very small amounts and apply in VERY thin coats, once the first coat is 1/2 kicked apply another VERY thin coat, and again 1/2 kicked apply 3rd coat the same way, then again @ 1/2 kicked apply a 4th coat--again I cannot stress this enough Very Very thin coats, you need to apply each coat fairly quickly as in less then 2 min so it does not kick enough to drag. This epoxy is made by the company that made West Systems epoxy's but this is not the same thing as West Systems products it is alot better quality product and works far better. once your final coat is on walk away for a day, then after it has cured start sanding lightly just to get a nice smooth surface --then a couple of coats of good automotive clear ( Not rattle can) and it will look perfect. I use PPG clear.
 

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OK the epoxy I use is Gougeon Brothers pro set 125 resin & their fast hardener just mix it in very small amounts and apply in VERY thin coats, once the first coat is 1/2 kicked apply another VERY thin coat, and again 1/2 kicked apply 3rd coat the same way, then again @ 1/2 kicked apply a 4th coat--again I cannot stress this enough Very Very thin coats, you need to apply each coat fairly quickly as in less then 2 min so it does not kick enough to drag. This epoxy is made by the company that made West Systems epoxy's but this is not the same thing as West Systems products it is alot better quality product and works far better. once your final coat is on walk away for a day, then after it has cured start sanding lightly just to get a nice smooth surface --then a couple of coats of good automotive clear ( Not rattle can) and it will look perfect. I use PPG clear.
This may be obvious to some folks, but I'll ask anyway. So I take it all of this is done with an airbrush or HVLP gun? (Point being you're not brushing it on)?
 

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No I do brush the epoxy on it spreads well and when done correctly it flows out nicely but the key is you have to spread it out very very thin --I am not trying to build much in thickness just fill & cover any pin holes and give the carbon some more strength and seal it so it lasts, the clear is sprayed just like any automotive paint from your HVLP gun
 

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No I do brush the epoxy on it spreads well and when done correctly it flows out nicely but the key is you have to spread it out very very thin --I am not trying to build much in thickness just fill & cover any pin holes and give the carbon some more strength and seal it so it lasts, the clear is sprayed just like any automotive paint from your HVLP gun
Is this to far gone to restore?
 

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No with that I would sand it down to get rid of the white spots, then once everything looks clean and good then coat with 3 or 4 coats of VERY thin epoxy--and I mean VERY thin-brush it on and when you think you need to use more just keep brushing it out--it will go a lot farther then you think--then the next day sand to smooth and even it out, then spray a couple of coats of good clear--again NOT Rattle Can
 

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All you need to do is knock the shine off the entire surface with #400 wet and dry paper , wash with acetone and then apply a 2 part automotive clearcoat over it.. I make carbon components and this is how I refinish all of them, no issues or problems, lasts the life of the component. Brushing West systems epoxy is a waste of time, not even the right type of epoxy for this application.
 
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