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You did ask if a user can replace the Hands Free Unit. That would be a yes because I swapped mine about a month ago on a 2010 Multistrada with assistance from a pdf file I got from someone on list who I can't remember right now. I got a new hands free unit with both a fob and a red key from Ducati Parts Unlimited (I think that is the name) for around $800. The hardest part of the install was figuring out where the bolts holding the coolant tank were. In a nutshell, the process is remove the gas tank and then remove/move the coolant tank. You need to do that to get to the bolts that hold the hands free unit that come up from the bottom. If you get a complete replacement set, you do not need anything from the dealer because the fob is already matched to the new hands free unit. The only thing you would need to do would be get thew key in the new fob cut to duplicate your old key or you could do what I did and swap the key from the bad fob to your new fob. I spent the most time locating where the bolts for the coolant tank were and I would guess I spent a total of four or five hours because I had never removed the tank before.

Hope this helps!

Bob
 

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Discussion Starter #42
Wow! Thanks for all the insight and ideas. I'll answer some questions...As far as the kill switch goes, it only kills the running motor but the electrical system stays powered. Although the on/off switch should be looked at which is just below the kill switch. (two separate sw's) I may attempt a hands free install after reading the above guidance. As far as fuses go, I'm thinking it either works or it doesn't. Ignition switch has merit. A chaffed wire also has merit but with a 2016 model and 5000 miles? The battery is original but I had replaced it with a Shorai on someones advice, but later Desmo in SFO said maybe it's better if I go back to the original. So I did.
A cold bike does seem to start regularly. But as far as my riding style I can't say that being aggressive or passive seems to have much to do with it. It could fail either way. The failures don't always happen on a ride, but when they begin they are consistent....meaning several fails before you get home. (If you get home)
Possibly some good news yesterday...Ducati North America has finally agreed to get involved.
 

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Wow! Thanks for all the insight and ideas. I'll answer some questions...As far as the kill switch goes, it only kills the running motor but the electrical system stays powered. Although the on/off switch should be looked at which is just below the kill switch. (two separate sw's) I may attempt a hands free install after reading the above guidance. As far as fuses go, I'm thinking it either works or it doesn't. Ignition switch has merit. A chaffed wire also has merit but with a 2016 model and 5000 miles? The battery is original but I had replaced it with a Shorai on someones advice, but later Desmo in SFO said maybe it's better if I go back to the original. So I did.
A cold bike does seem to start regularly. But as far as my riding style I can't say that being aggressive or passive seems to have much to do with it. It could fail either way. The failures don't always happen on a ride, but when they begin they are consistent....meaning several fails before you get home. (If you get home)
Possibly some good news yesterday...Ducati North America has finally agreed to get involved.
Heat and vibration are often triggers for intermittent electrical issues. If you have a route that you can ride where the issue is triggered and it is safe to poke around with a test light on the side of the road you could do some troubleshooting but it isn't easy to get to all test points, especially if your bike has much of a fairing. I would start by testing for voltage just downstream of the on/off switch. Don't know if your model uses a key style ignition switch but that could also be at fault. It could be that the battery has an intermittent internal connection but that type of failure is rare.

Make sure DNA understands that it has to be ridden to trigger the fault. Intermittent electrical problems are frustrating even for mechanics. If you can arrange it, limp the bike into the shop when it is in failure mode and they can troubleshoot while it is acting up.
 

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Discussion Starter #44
The battery was swapped out earlier with another and failures still occurred, so I'd like to put that further down the list. I'd like to get inside the on/off switch and look for trouble. It just doesn't seem likely. The bike is practically new.
 
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