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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My 2018 959 Corse came stock with a lithium Ion battery.

I immediately bought a Deltran tender that can be selected for Lithium Ion or Acid batteries: Battery Tender Junior 12V 800 Selectable Lead Acid/Lithium Charger

I put the bike on the tender all winter, never giving it a second thought.

I'm now discovering that Lithium Ion batteries don't like to be charged in freezing temperatures, and can even explode when doing so.

Can I leave this battery plugged into the tender all winter, with Northeastern temps frequently dipping below freezing, for extended periods?

Thanks
 

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.....I'm now discovering that Lithium Ion batteries don't like to be charged in freezing temperatures, and can even explode when doing so.

Can I leave this battery plugged into the tender all winter, with Northeastern temps frequently dipping below freezing, for extended periods?

Thanks
Going by the first sentence in the quote above, the answer to your question in the second sentence is obviously "No". You answered your own question.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Going by the first sentence in the quote above, the answer to your question in the second sentence is obviously "No". You answered your own question.
I was told that charging a Li-Ion batt below freezing temps is not suggested, but having it on a tender is OK.

Getting conflicting info, hoping this thread will give me a definitive answer.

Thanks
 

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The fact is the best thing you can do with a Lithium battery in the off season is store it at low temperature in a refrigerator.
Does that answer your question?
 

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You know keeping it inside won’t hurt, but charging it outside might hurt. I know what I’d do.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The fact is the best thing you can do with a Lithium battery in the off season is store it at low temperature in a refrigerator.
Does that answer your question?
Kind of.

But what about keeping it plugged into a battery tender for the winter?

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I would not. I don't know what Li battery you get with a new bike, but I use a Shorai. I got the proper charger from Shorai for it, and it has 2 modes. Charge and storage.

Storage mode discharges the battery to about 80%. For that reason alone, I'd suggest not leaving it on charge all winter. Shorai is constructed a little differently from some Li batteries so that might also be something to consider.

From my own separate research into Li, LiPo and LiFe batteries, the common theme that came up when I researched failures is cell stability. None of them respond well to over charging or use while undercharged.

Once a cell becomes unstable it can and will at some point affect the neighboring cell, eventually destabilizing it. Typically the destabilization is exhibited in the form of thermal runaway so the effect is propagating. One cell, then the next, then the next like dominoes.

The heat produces flammable gasses from the destabilized cells. Once the heat reaches combustion point, the whole thing goes up in flames.

Keeping the cells stable is the key to a longer battery life. For the Shorai, that means periodically plugging in to the charger. I don't know what other battery makers are doing with on board cell balancing circuitry and how well they work with a traditional style charger. Even one with a lithium battery protection circuit.

All I got, hope it is of some help in your decision making process.........sean
 

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Twice a year? How shitty is this design?? Oh wait...having owned a couple ST's, it's a Ducati. Pretty shitty.

Still, remove it and bring it in the house. No charger needed. Put it in next spring when you are going to start it again.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I would not. I don't know what Li battery you get with a new bike, but I use a Shorai. I got the proper charger from Shorai for it, and it has 2 modes. Charge and storage.

Storage mode discharges the battery to about 80%. For that reason alone, I'd suggest not leaving it on charge all winter. Shorai is constructed a little differently from some Li batteries so that might also be something to consider.

From my own separate research into Li, LiPo and LiFe batteries, the common theme that came up when I researched failures is cell stability. None of them respond well to over charging or use while undercharged.

Once a cell becomes unstable it can and will at some point affect the neighboring cell, eventually destabilizing it. Typically the destabilization is exhibited in the form of thermal runaway so the effect is propagating. One cell, then the next, then the next like dominoes.

The heat produces flammable gasses from the destabilized cells. Once the heat reaches combustion point, the whole thing goes up in flames.

Keeping the cells stable is the key to a longer battery life. For the Shorai, that means periodically plugging in to the charger. I don't know what other battery makers are doing with on board cell balancing circuitry and how well they work with a traditional style charger. Even one with a lithium battery protection circuit.

All I got, hope it is of some help in your decision making process.........sean
Can I just leave the Li-Ion battery in the bike, off the tender, for the entire winter (with below freezing temps)?

Then put it back on the tender for the spring?

Thanks
 

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Can I just leave the Li-Ion battery in the bike, off the tender, for the entire winter (with below freezing temps)?

Then put it back on the tender for the spring?

Thanks
Presumably so. Again, I don't know what manufacturer made your battery. It isn't like a Li battery has a liquid inside that you have to worry about. It doesn't have an acid/distilled water mixture (electrolyte) inside that can separate and freeze.

If you were going to do what you wrote above, monitor the battery voltage and make sure it doesn't drop below the manufacturer spec. IIRC that is commonly 11vdc or somewhere between there and 12vdc.

That's where you'll want to keep it for both longevity as well as cell stability. That's a very generalized statement and not specific to any brand battery.

You'll definitely want to research the brand of battery you have and see what the manufacturer recommends. Inform yourself about the product you're using....no one is going to have the answers you need when you need them most.....sean
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Presumably so. Again, I don't know what manufacturer made your battery. It isn't like a Li battery has a liquid inside that you have to worry about. It doesn't have an acid/distilled water mixture (electrolyte) inside that can separate and freeze.

If you were going to do what you wrote above, monitor the battery voltage and make sure it doesn't drop below the manufacturer spec. IIRC that is commonly 11vdc or somewhere between there and 12vdc.

That's where you'll want to keep it for both longevity as well as cell stability. That's a very generalized statement and not specific to any brand battery.

You'll definitely want to research the brand of battery you have and see what the manufacturer recommends. Inform yourself about the product you're using....no one is going to have the answers you need when you need them most.....sean
Pretty sure it's a Shorai.

Thanks
 
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