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Hi,

I wondered if any can help me with a quick question. Not very mechanically minded :-(

I have an Urban Enduro but was actually out on my Street Triple (sorry, not an official Ducati question) today and was pulling you to a stop at a traffic light and must have forgot to change down. I was in 3rd when I stoped and went to change down and it wouldn’t shift into 2nd, pushed down on the shift level and just no clunk. This has happened before on this, and other bikes every now and then and I usually just carefully start to let out the clutch lever a tiny bit and pull it back in, that’s usually enough to jog something and let’s me the shift down.

I did the same this time and when I let the clutch out a tiny bit and heard a slight noise for just a second (pulled the clutch back in) like 2 cogs very slightly rubbing/skimming against each other, not grinding or crunching or anything. Since the transmission is a constant mesh and all cogs are connected all the time, what was rubbing against each other and would this have caused any harm?

Also, what is the best way to get out of a stuck gear like that?

Thanks in advance for your help?


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Little odd that this is not about your Scrambler and asking here but... When you are in gear, there is a direct path through the gearbox, i,e., the drive shaft is connected through the countershaft to the selected gear and would drive the bike except for the the disengaged clutch. Residual clutch friction and spring load makes the gearbox want to stay engaged but your problem is most likely due to being in a higher gear, if the the corresponding slot for the next lower gear is not lined up, it is harder to get enough rotational movement to line it up. Try rocking the bike a little for and aft with your feet or even releasing the brake may be enough. Just moving a little under power in the current gear is the normal solution (as you have sort of noted). As an alternative, shutting the engine down will remove the clutch load that is also making it difficult.

Damage, not likely. A much more damaging possibility is to get into a neutral between higher gears while shifting and have the now disconnected counter shaft lose sync with any gear. Now, when attempting to engage, the dog can crash into several slots before engaging one as it attempts to make up a large speed differential.
 

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Here's my take... bike transmissions are constant mesh but engaging a gear means sliding a locking dog into slots on the particular gear you're interested in. For some reason the dog engagement in first gear is easy when the bike isn't moving, for higher gears it isn't. I surmise that if the dogs aren't very well aligned in higher gears they just won't slide into the gear. Letting the clutch out a bit will cause the input shaft to rotate until the dogs line up and slide into gear, simple as that.

As long as you're gentle (just a bit of clutch and motor at idle) it won't cause any damage at all but you may feel/hear some mechanical stuff going on as the dog slides along the gear to find it's alignment. If you're ham fisted you could cause wear on the engagement bits of your transmission (the same sort of wear you'd get if you do a lot of incompetent clutchless shifting).
 
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