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I'm thinking about going in September. Anyone ever been? Comments? Interested in going?
 

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I've been to several, California, STT and Schwantz. I left each with great benefits from attending. They will teach you in a day or two what would take years of riding on the street. A must for beginners and intermediate riders.
 

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I did Level 1. I thought I was clever in picking a date where cool temperatures normally prevailed. Weather gods did not collaborate and the Streets of Willow were bathed in 100 plus degree heat on the day of the class. Most of the participants were younger guns, but I held my own, somewhere around mid-pack when it came to progress and speed.

I found the class to be very invaluable, and the exercises were well designed. Loved the "follow the coach" format. It made me a safer street rider. The BMW S1000RR bikes were awesome, and I thought I was a hero and riding them close to 7/10s. This is when I was told that they were in "Rain mode".

I now need to get the courage, time, and funds together to do level 2.
 

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I have been doing these for years level 1 through 4 at VIR and Barbar. They have an excellent program and you learn a lot quickly in a very controlled and safe environment.
We all think we are fast and have great form and skills…….we are soooooo wrong :) The levels introduce techniques in a cumulative manner. You build your skill set one step at a time. Most of the time it was 1 instructor per 3-4 students. If you ask for more help several instructors will jump in, keep an eye on you, and give you great feedback.

Standard format is 20 min classroom, 20 min track, 20 min debrief.
The lean bike, slide bike and video taping are great teaching tools.

I really recommend this course
 

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Discussion Starter #6
man, I am definitely gonna do it!

Do you think the training translates well to riding the hyper?
 

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man, I am definitely gonna do it!

Do you think the training translates well to riding the hyper?
Absolutely...assuming you're riding the hyper Superbike style?

I've done level 1 and it was invaluable. Same comments as above posters. I want to go back and do levels 2-4.



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It seems significantly cheaper to use your own ride than the beemers. (~$350 instead of $675) For those of you who have done it, what do you say? The hyper or the beemer? Is it worth the extra scratch?
 

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I have done the school, and the s1000rr is an intrinsic part of the school. Through electronics, I can be set from tame to wild, and is as predictable and stable as a video game bike if you want it to be while you learn. S1000rr is a no-brainer for the small additional cost


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I took a one day course at laguna seca on the zx6r and had a gas and learned tons about riding. Got my knee down for the first time too, which was awesome. I will absolutely do again when the funds come available and I think I'll bring the SS.
 

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I've done levels 1-4 [two level 4 classes at VIR]. I got a lot out of it, and I would definitely recommend it to novice or beginner riders. All the coaches are very good at telling you that you are riding like crap in a nice way. Two post ride meetings with Cobie Fair was actaully worth the cost admission. He is really good.

Three things to note:

1. They don't teach you trail braking.
2. The lean bike is crap.
3. They distributed Scientology literature at NJMP a few years back.

I probably won't go back because reasons 1 & 3.

I'm going to check out the Yamaha school at Miller. I've heard very good things.
 

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Superbike School

The CSS program is a good one. You'll learn one skill at a time and you'll learn a thing or two about yourself.

The first three levels get through a comprehensive set of skills. Level four is a custom level where the student is paired with an on-track coach and an off track consultant. Together in Lvl 4 you will hash out what you need/want to work on.

For lvls 1-2-3, you'll be in a classroom for each skill and then you go to the track to execute that skill just learned in the classroom. So you'll be interacting will a classroom instructor and an on-track coach.

I first attended in 2003 for lvl 1 & 2. Then went back in 2007 for lvl 3 & 4.

Since then I've returned many times and I continue to improve. Last session was May 2013 NJMP Thunderbolt.

I always use their leathers and bike. I've done the 2 day camp and I've done single days. The main difference there is the non-camp days have three groups riding so each group has five track sessions. On camp days there are two groups and seven sessions. And the camp price includes the bike and leathers.

You will be worn out by session five.

As for the off track training bikes, each serves a purpose. Every student should take time with each bike. One for braking, leaning, no BS bike and the slide bike if the facility has enough room to run the slide.

Listen, every program has its benefactors and its detractors.

Bottom line. The program is very good in many ways. You will also develop a maturity that will change how you'll ride on the street.

And lastly, I have not seen any Scientology literature in the past 3 years. And there is never any proselytizing. The only conversation coming from CSS is the art and technology of cornering a motorcycle.

As for trail braking, there is a Keith Code program called "C.O.D.E. Race".
I've not done that school but it's all about racing. I'd bet trail braking will be covered there. It's just not a subject for the primary CSS program.

Sign up and go enjoy yourself.
 

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NO scientology literature when I went last year at Barber. And do I really care what religious preference a person(s) teaching me to ride has???? Absolutely don't give a rat's ass.

Two day superbike camp I did at barber was worth every penny, learned a ton plus they teach in such a way you can build on it at track days, which indeed, I have done. I'm also a much better rider on the streets (people I've been riding with for years have told me this).

Go for the s1krr, brilliant bike, a blast to ride.



I've done levels 1-4 [two level 4 classes at VIR]. I got a lot out of it, and I would definitely recommend it to novice or beginner riders. All the coaches are very good at telling you that you are riding like crap in a nice way. Two post ride meetings with Cobie Fair was actaully worth the cost admission. He is really good.

Three things to note:

1. They don't teach you trail braking.
2. The lean bike is crap.
3. They distributed Scientology literature at NJMP a few year back.

I probably won't go back because reasons 1 & 3.

I'm going to check out the Yamaha school at Miller. I've heard very good things.
 

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NO scientology literature when I went last year at Barber. And do I really care what religious preference a person(s) teaching me to ride has???? Absolutely don't give a rat's ass.
That's my point. What does religion have to do with learning how to corner a motorcycle? It's like if your scuba diving instructor gave you the Book of Mormon after your scuba class.
 

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As mentioned didn't see any religious literature of any sort there. I take a bit of a different attitude tho, if they chose to put scientology literature out next to the tire brochures and such, i'd have no problem with it. It'd be my choice to pick it or tire brochures up.

EIther way , no biggie.

That's my point. What does religion have to do with learning how to corner a motorcycle? It's like if your scuba diving instructor gave you the Book of Mormon after your scuba class.
 
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