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Discussion Starter #41
Those lines won't last forever, will they - even rated ones. Well, the little lines to the cap and to the overflow seemed ok and since the PO eliminated the in-tank filter that left just the rotted line I replaced (I think?). I don't remember any other lines.

 

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Lol.. A customer bought a vintage gsxr750 slab side for me to turn into a vintage race bike, It was bought as a unfinished project but complete. It also had no oil in the forks and it could have not leaked out, who drains a set of forks and goes to the trouble of re-assembling them on the bike with no oil?

The joys of buying used.
Momma said, life is like a box'o chocolates................
 

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Discussion Starter #45 (Edited)
Pulled the right fork off today and disassembled. To my eye, it didn't look like the manual or any of the videos on the process. Had an anodized green bit that fits the 17mm wrench at the top that had three pins poking into a single metal washer - the manual mentioned a whole lot more "washers" that weren't there. It was very clean, but I knew the fork oil was at least three years old and possibly as much as 11 so I am glad I did it - it was roughly about half the 440cc that were supposed to be in there. Funny thing, the left one does not have the allen bolt at the very bottom of the fork (for the rebound rod?)- is that normal? I will refresh the oil in the left one this week, but to be honest the forks handle great right now,... would like to clear up why the left one is different before I take it apart.

Perhaps I will regret it, but I did not replace the oil seal while I was in there, it has shown no sign of leaking in 60 miles so maybe it is alright.

 

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Discussion Starter #46
Don't think I've got the fork quite right, going to have to pull it off again. But it is good enough for a ride in the sunshine today.

 

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Both legs come apart the same unless someone changed something. Remember the left side has the threaded axle adapter you need to remove first to access the damper assembly bolt.

I also would be wary of the brake line routing at the caliper shown in the picture, the line should be pointing up not forward looks like the wrong lines fitted and that could lead to a line failure. Test them fully through travel to make sure the line is not going to pull out or get pushed into the wheel/tire and ripped off.
 

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Discussion Starter #48
Ah-Ha! Yes, the left one does have that threaded insert, that's the explanation, thanks.

I did move the brake line after a quick test ride, the cabling is really tricky behind the speedo with all the relocation of the wiring and I was focused more on that.
 

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I also would be wary of the brake line routing at the caliper shown in the picture, the line should be pointing up not forward looks like the wrong lines fitted and that could lead to a line failure. Test them fully through travel to make sure the line is not going to pull out or get pushed into the wheel/tire and ripped off.
Great spot! I just want to say, your contributions to this forum are incredibly valuable. You’ve certainly made my life as a 900ss *owner/repairer much easier. So thanks!

*(SS owner = repairer :wink2:)
 

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Discussion Starter #51
Great spot! I just want to say, your contributions to this forum are incredibly valuable. You’ve certainly made my life as a 900ss *owner/repairer much easier. So thanks!

*(SS owner = repairer :wink2:)
See! I did adjust it, and yes, the info coming on this forum from its oldest members is invaluable!

Pic goes sideways, wcyd?

 

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Just curious where they hid the rectifier?

As to helping , we are all helping each other to steward these bikes and pass them on to later owners. much like finding that really cool old bike is fun to us just think how thrilled a owner in another 20 years will be with a carby SS such as these. I wont be here then so we need to pass the skills down to the next generation in the hope that they too will pass the information on.
 

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Discussion Starter #54 (Edited)
My first question too after seeing it for the first time in the PO's garage - where is the ignition key, regulator,fuse box and relays? Well - all moved to the back except for the key which is on a neat mount on the lower frame like an ineffective slider. The whole thing, heavy steering lock and all! (that will have to go, I'm thinking keyless remote).

All wiring is tight and sadly wrapped in electrical tape - all of it has to be rewrapped in shrink tape, but very cleverly done with either connectors or soldered.

Fuse box is upside down and projects through a rectangular hole cut in the cubby tray inside the fenderwell with the cover glued on. Why didn't he mount that sideways instead? I will, then I can easily get to both the wiring and the fuses. The regulator could be pushed through the tray instead of up there where it gets no cooling, so I will make that change. Have to figure out a way to isolate the heat from the plastic, but it doesn't seem to have melted it where it is now,...

But the most annoying thing is that the bunched up wiring only fits the stock seat! Corbin seats do not have the "gap" where all of this fits in so I can't use them!


 

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Creative wiring is always fun! I have a 996 in the shop right now that has the wiring and battery stuffed under the seat in just such a fashion.

Keep an eye on that original rectifier as well they are known for losing the regulator and overcharging. If you wanted to keep the wiring under the seat I too would try and move the rectifier under the plastic so it gets air flow.
 

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As to helping , we are all helping each other to steward these bikes and pass them on to later owners. much like finding that really cool old bike is fun to us just think how thrilled a owner in another 20 years will be with a carby SS such as these. I wont be here then so we need to pass the skills down to the next generation in the hope that they too will pass the information on.
That’s bang on! I’m keeping mine forever, then handing it to my son on strict instructions to look after and not sell. Just imagine, “Remember petrol? Carburetors, what are they?”

My younger brother recently pointed out a BMW SUV which was hybrid. It has speakers that play the sound of a powerful combustion engine. How sad! I might just record my Duc, in case I’m forced to ride a bike that only plays MP3.
 

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Call me crazy I always liked the early white frame/wheels and early font decals.
Totally agree - I´m (supposed to be) retromodding my cracked frame & swing-arm, worn out & abused ´97 into a 1992 lookalike - though I´m not going for white wheels as they are a total pita to keep clean :D
 
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