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That motorcycle looks great and the sounds the engine makes are awesome. I agree with the reviewer. For the money I would want better suspension and brakes. However, I wouldn't want electronic suspension on that motorcycle. It doesn't belong on a retro style motorcycle. I'm not a fan of electronic suspension on any motorcycle.


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Like I said in another thread, I think if you want a more sedate and refined experience along with great performance the SFV4 is the bike to have, but if you are after a little more edgy and raw character combined with world class performance the Tuono delivers that more than the SFV4 IMO.

(When I say "performance" I'm referring to both engine and handling characteristics.)
And if you're after a hooligan... SDR. All three bikes will be the perfect choice for some riders... depending on what they're after.
 

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That Superveloce looks much better moving in video with a rider than it does in stills. I don't know if it's a bike I would buy but it's more than just the design exercise in retro styling (and not much else) that I had previously thought.
 

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Bon Vivant
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Discussion Starter · #44 ·
That Superveloce looks much better moving in video with a rider than it does in stills. I don't know if it's a bike I would buy but it's more than just the design exercise in retro styling (and not much else) that I had previously thought.
It's interesting that it does seem to be a bike with a divisive style. I guess I'm drawn to stuff like that. To me it's extremely beautiful but Neeves doesn't like it. Maybe people are put off by the fact that the styling seems to be the point rather than substance and function. Unfortunately it usually seems that highly stylized bikes do lack effective functionality. But from the review it seems like this bike may be an exception (I'm still skeptical)
 

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oooops
wrong link......
 

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Bon Vivant
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Discussion Starter · #48 ·
Well, this has been a long road but now that I've ridden the new multi and decided not to buy it - (at least not this year) I've decided to replace the Tuono. I've had it for 5 years and its been an amazing bike but I'm longing for a change. I've considered the Superveloce, the new Speed Triple, and the v4 SF. The used bike in this review is still available and I'm strongly leaning that direction. The new Speedie, is an unknown at this point and the features look good but Triumph didn't break any molds redesigning it. Wondering if any of you can give me a strong argument for one or another bike?
 

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Well, this has been a long road but now that I've ridden the new multi and decided not to buy it - (at least not this year) I've decided to replace the Tuono. I've had it for 5 years and its been an amazing bike but I'm longing for a change. I've considered the Superveloce, the new Speed Triple, and the v4 SF. The used bike in this review is still available and I'm strongly leaning that direction. The new Speedie, is an unknown at this point and the features look good but Triumph didn't break any molds redesigning it. Wondering if any of you can give me a strong argument for one or another bike?
Why do you think the used bike is still available? Do you think it's priced too high or the market is slow (and it is winter, after all) or something else? I would have thought that a used SFV4 would be long gone.
 

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Bon Vivant
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Discussion Starter · #50 · (Edited)
Why do you think the used bike is still available? Do you think it's priced too high or the market is slow (and it is winter, after all) or something else? I would have thought that a used SFV4 would be long gone.
I'm not sure really but It's not an S and most people want the S version and the price they are quoting is the same as a new one. I think I can get it for quite a bit under a new bike or I will opt for a new one too.

The S model has electronic suspension and forged wheels. I don't care for the chicken feet design of the forged wheels and the suspension is not a huge deal to me. I think I can buy this bike about 6 or 7 K under the price of a new S.
 

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Personally speaking, I would take the base and upgrade the suspension and wheels myself.
 
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Bon Vivant
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Discussion Starter · #52 ·
Personally speaking, I would take the base and upgrade the suspension and wheels myself.
I actually think the base showa/sachs suspension works really well. Wheels are a about 4 pounds different, it would be nice to get some forged 10 spoke marchesinis but I probably wont.


 

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A buddy of mine sold his SF848 and got the speedie and hasn't stopped talking about it. It's easy to flash with tuneecu as well.

The first thing I noticed riding it was that it dips ridiculously fast. Cornering is effortless, but we're all aware of the wrestling match between the rider and [ SF848 that must be won to turn. I can't say I really like feather light steering.

One thing I don't like at all is the triples whizzing exhaust note. It was a deal breaker for me.

Get the SFV4, the kids are waiting for it. :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #54 ·
A buddy of mine sold his SF848 and got the speedie and hasn't stopped talking about it. It's easy to flash with tuneecu as well.

The first thing I noticed riding it was that it dips ridiculously fast. Cornering is effortless, but we're all aware of the wrestling match between the rider and [ SF848 that must be won to turn. I can't say I really like feather light steering.

One thing I don't like at all is the triples whizzing exhaust note. It was a deal breaker for me.

Get the SFV4, the kids are waiting for it. :)
I rode the 19 speed triple last year and loved it - everything was perfectly sorted, the fueling was fantastic, suspension sublime, and the bike is so light and nimble... But it had those shitty M4 Brembos that loose the lever after every stop and must be pumped to work. There's no way I was going to suffer that BS. The new bike is very different and it has the new Stylema calipers which are wonderful. It also has top spec Ohlins manually adjusted suspension. All of which sounds very appealing. But you are right about the exhaust note - I'm not a fan of the sound of a triple.

I'd probably have already bought the SF if my dealer would get off his bum. But hell if he wants to wait around till I get a chance to ride the Speedie thats fine with me. :ROFLMAO:
 

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Speedies are wonderful machines! I was considering this too before I went for a SFV4. There were however two dealbreakers for me. The engine torque curve is flat like floor. Technically its brilliant to have the same torque on all rpm's. But it took the fun out of revving. There were no rewards waiting as the revs climbed, it always felt the same whatever you did. A bit like driving a powerful diesel car. Some love it, but I fancy to get more acceleration and rush the more I rev a motor.

You can't wheelie without turning TC off. I'm not using TC to be lazy and my trackbike does not have TC, but on the streets I like to have it as a safety net if gravel or diesel spills are surprising you.
The new speedie will have a separate configurable wheelie control, but IF it's implemented like in the street triple and Daytona's (speculation) you can't turn it off separately. To turn it off you need to turn off TC as well.

For me personally, those two things took the fun out of a bike that otherwise would be a really, really good bike.
 

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Discussion Starter · #56 · (Edited)
Speedies are wonderful machines! I was considering this too before I went for a SFV4. There were however two dealbreakers for me. The engine torque curve is flat like floor. Technically its brilliant to have the same torque on all rpm's. But it took the fun out of revving. There were no rewards waiting as the revs climbed, it always felt the same whatever you did. A bit like driving a powerful diesel car. Some love it, but I fancy to get more acceleration and rush the more I rev a motor.

You can't wheelie without turning TC off. I'm not using TC to be lazy and my trackbike does not have TC, but on the streets I like to have it as a safety net if gravel or diesel spills are surprising you.
The new speedie will have a separate configurable wheelie control, but IF it's implemented like in the street triple and Daytona's (speculation) you can't turn it off separately. To turn it off you need to turn off TC as well.

For me personally, those two things took the fun out of a bike that otherwise would be a really, really good bike.
Unfortunately the SF V4 is a wheelie joy killer - the counter rotating crankshaft, long swingarm, aerodynamics, decreasing torque management, and anti wheelie all work against hooliganism. If you want a bike that's fun to wheelie the new SF isnt it.
 

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Unfortunately the SF V4 is a wheelie joy killer - the counter rotating crankshaft, long swingarm, decreasing torque management, and anti wheelie all work against hooliganism. If you want a bike that's fun to wheelie the new SF isnt it.
Which really makes me question the point of it all.., I mean aren't sportbikes with clip ons and full fairings supposed to be all about ultimate efficiency, putting all that power to the ground, getting that perfect lap time, perfecting that line and body position, serious focus..etc?
And aren't sportbikes with high bars and without fairings all about barely hanging onto the raging beast beneath you all the while laughing hysterically to yourself at the insanity of it all..?
Or am I missing something?
 

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Unfortunately the SF V4 is a wheelie joy killer - the counter rotating crankshaft, long swingarm, decreasing torque management, and anti wheelie all work against hooliganism. If you want a bike that's fun to wheelie the new SF isnt it.
I thought so too at first and I couldn't pop it as I use to do on other bikes. There are however solutions to that 😎.
Replace the heavy lead acid battery that is housed close to the steering stem to a light LiFePo4 unit.
Remove the largest wing pair. These two little mods reduce the front weight both statically and dynamically and unsets the carefully calibrated torque mapping from factory. I also tried to remove all wings, and it got even better, but the highspeed stability was horrible. So those wings are not only for looks, they're definitely a part of how the bike is engineered and behaves.

You also have to treat the throttle differently to other bikes due to the decreasing torque mapping. You need to always twist it even if you want constant torque. After adapting to this, the bike is actually a wonderful wheelie bike. The balance point is wide and accessible and it's very easy to steer sideways. You can pick it up at 100 mph and just go as long as you like and of course at any speed below that.

It's not like the old SF or SDR that just wants to wheelie whatever you do. But I like that. Its fast, planted and stable when I want, and wheelies when I want.

I totally agree that Ducati missed the point with this bike regarding hooliganism. They mapped it too tame and well behaved. I don't think that was what the customers wanted. I would prefer different torque mappings on different riding modes to be able to decide it myself.

After the mods, I'm however very happy as it is now, and expect it to be even more fun when there are good flashes available that removes the torque limiters entirely.

I'm not saying that the SFV4 is the perfect bike for anyone, but for me it has struck a very nice balance between performance and fun.

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Discussion Starter · #59 · (Edited)
I figured there would be someone who would tell me I'm full of shit but you have a very thoughtful and detailed description of the bike and how you are able to wheelie it. I'm impressed and a bit humbled, it takes a lot of skill to overcome the difficulties in wheelieing the SF. I wish I could learn to wheelie like that because I love to do it. But at 60 I just think my reflexes are little too slow these days. (and I'm scared)

It's interesting that you found the balance point to be wide, Neeves who also loves to wheelie said in his review that he found it to be narrow and touchy. He found the SF very difficult to wheelie.

But if you could do this with the SF I think you could have worked with the Speedie as well. ;) Who needs TC? most of my bikes don't have it and its turned off on the ones that do anyway. Its been off since day1 on my 1098 SF (and if any bike needs it its that one!)
 
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