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Didn鈥檛 you get a Thruxton when it came out and a Z900 after? You鈥檙e definitely gonna get the MV I just know it. I just don鈥檛 get why you鈥檇 want the SF. I do envy your ability to get the new shiny thing though even if the buzz goes quicker than some of the bikes. Nice to be able to.
 

Bon Vivant
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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Didn鈥檛 you get a Thruxton when it came out and a Z900 after? You鈥檙e definitely gonna get the MV I just know it. I just don鈥檛 get why you鈥檇 want the SF. I do envy your ability to get the new shiny thing though even if the buzz goes quicker than some of the bikes. Nice to be able to.
Yep still have the Thruxton, its a great all-around motorcycle with looks, comfort, and very respectable performance. The Z900 has been a pain in my ass to get running right but it is now quite well sorted with an Akrapovic pipe and a custom tune. Its also very easy to ride and super nimble with amazing fit and finish - easily on par with anything from Europe. Both are good bikes that are very usable. But If I buy something new I am going to sell the Kaw, I just cant maintain any more bikes.

And you are right - sometimes the buzz does go quicker than the bike but I tend to move those on pretty quickly - I really do hang on to the good ones. And ya know, after almost 11 years I still get a buzz every time I look at or ride the 1098SF!

My big issue with the MV is that I just know its going to be torture to ride. I have to decide if the beauty and exclusivity are worth the agony of actual ownership.

Thats the difference in the 2 bikes - the SFV4 would be a good bike to own and to ride for years to come - the MV - well, it's a beautiful work of art that I could suffer through riding around the block once a month or so. Lets face it both bikes are a vanity purchase and even with the pain of ownership the MV strokes the vanity more than the SF.
 

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I forgot to add, that review is very well written, better than most by the press, is neutral and doesn鈥檛 appear to be biased except to your own preferences which you are upfront about. Thanks good read.
 

Hammer Down
2020 Multistrada 1260 S Touring
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I think the MV is an itch you need to scratch. If then it really is that uncomfortable for you, move on. Notwithstanding the comfort factor, you really need to ring it out to access the power. Is there somewhere nearby you can test ride one?
 

Bon Vivant
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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
I think the MV is an itch you need to scratch. If then it really is that uncomfortable for you, move on. Notwithstanding the comfort factor, you really need to ring it out to access the power. Is there somewhere nearby you can test ride one?
No, there are none in the US right now and I was told that the US MV importer has lost its flooring plan, so dealers have to buy the bikes outright. Most dealerships are not ordering any of the new bikes this year. The only way I can get one is to order it sight-unseen. Pay your money and take your chances! I dont think the SV has even hit our shores at all yet. Dealer tells me the end of next month. One thing is for sure - it'll be a very rare and exclusive bike.

And as far as buying it and moving on, most of the time that's not too hard to do but MV's are like Mercedes, the drop in value off the showroom floor is gigantic. I do stand to loose about half the MSRP on a quick turnover.
 

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No, there are none in the US right now and I was told that the US MV importer has lost its flooring plan, so dealers have to buy the bikes outright. Most dealerships are not ordering any of the new bikes this year. The only way I can get one is to order it sight-unseen. Pay your money and take your chances! I dont think the SV has even hit our shores at all yet. Dealer tells me the end of next month. One thing is for sure - it'll be a very rare and exclusive bike.

And as far as buying it and moving on, most of the time that's not too hard to do but MV's are like Mercedes, the drop in value off the showroom floor is gigantic. I do stand to loose about half the MSRP on a quick turnover.
I don't know the how's or what's or why's but the Las Vegas dealer got in a new Brutal 1000RR and quickly sold it to a client in Los Angeles last week. It's the only one that I have seen in the US.
 

Bon Vivant
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Discussion Starter · #28 ·
I don't know the how's or what's or why's but the Las Vegas dealer got in a new Brutal 1000RR and quickly sold it to a client in Los Angeles last week. It's the only one that I have seen in the US.
Yeah I think the Brutale's are set to arrive but the Super veloche is a little behind it. And I think I was told that MV is helping with the flooring on the Brutale but not on the SV so dealers are more likely to order the Brutale. All of this is second hand info so take it as anecdotal.

I'm seeing a bunch of reviews of the Brutale on YT but so far I've only seen one ride out in the wild on a SV and that was in Austria and I couldn't understand the audio.
One of the YT reviewers raised a bunch of my personal red flags in his review of the Brutale so that bike is off the table.
 

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2020 Multistrada 1260 S Touring
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I was hoping maybe you could sit on it and maybe do a short test ride, and then move on if that short ride didn鈥檛 do it for you. But sounds like that鈥檚 going to be unlikely based on your above comments.
 

Bon Vivant
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Discussion Starter · #30 ·
Update:
I did a nice long ride on my Tuono with my regular group of riding buddies this weekend. I found myself thinking about the SFV4 and comparing it to the Tuono as I rode. Now, its been several days and my sensation from the duc is not fresh but surprisingly I was longing for the smoothness and ease of the SF over the brutish rush of the Tuono. My memory of the SF is that in very tiny amounts the throttle control is more refined, the riding position more comfortable, and the handling /turn-in more confident than the Aprilia. I have to say that these revelations are a complete surprise, I was sure that the Tuono would deliver a more engaging experience but I couldn't shake the feeling of how good the SF was to ride last week. Again the feeling was one of ease and comfort rather than one of adrenaline and excitement, I guess those things are more important to me these days than shear power. Does that mean I'm getting old?

Anyway, I'm not about to trade in my Tuono for the SF. If I am getting old I'm gonna go kicking and screaming...
 

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Mike
Great to read your review and I very much value your opinion after following you for years since we first started riding our 1098s'.
I visited the dealer to look at the V4 and didn't even get excited enough to take it for a test ride.

The 1098 looks the part and its riding manners speak the part.
"Don't mess with me" was how my wife described the 1098 when I brought it home 10 years ago.... and that is it in a nutshell.

Each to their own of course but I'll be keeping mine forever. I don't ride it as much because similar to yourself, I am getting a little older. I have other bikes that I ride most often. But when I get back on the 1098, OMG is it fantastic!!! It is so uncompromising, so razor sharp and aggressive I am just excited about it every time. It's a weapon for sure.

Thanks for posting your review.

991804
 

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Mike
Great to read your review and I very much value your opinion after following you for years since we first started riding our 1098s'.
I visited the dealer to look at the V4 and didn't even get excited enough to take it for a test ride.

The 1098 looks the part and its riding manners speak the part.
"Don't mess with me" was how my wife described the 1098 when I brought it home 10 years ago.... and that is it in a nutshell.

Each to their own of course but I'll be keeping mine forever. I don't ride it as much because similar to yourself, I am getting a little older. I have other bikes that I ride most often. But when I get back on the 1098, OMG is it fantastic!!! It is so uncompromising, so razor sharp and aggressive I am just excited about it every time. It's a weapon for sure.

Thanks for posting your review.

View attachment 991804
Loving that exhaust, nice work
 

Bon Vivant
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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
Mike
Great to read your review and I very much value your opinion after following you for years since we first started riding our 1098s'.
I visited the dealer to look at the V4 and didn't even get excited enough to take it for a test ride.

The 1098 looks the part and its riding manners speak the part.
"Don't mess with me" was how my wife described the 1098 when I brought it home 10 years ago.... and that is it in a nutshell.

Each to their own of course but I'll be keeping mine forever. I don't ride it as much because similar to yourself, I am getting a little older. I have other bikes that I ride most often. But when I get back on the 1098, OMG is it fantastic!!! It is so uncompromising, so razor sharp and aggressive I am just excited about it every time. It's a weapon for sure.

Thanks for posting your review.

View attachment 991804
and after all these years your bike still looks so bad-ass!
 

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Thanks guys!
 

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I've heard this quoted before and wonder about this statement..
The 916/996/998 series won 117 WSB races between '94 and 2003, to the 999's 64 from '03 to '07
So the 999 must have won a hell of a lot of domestic races to make up the difference. But so did the 916 series, so where does this statement come from?
I don鈥檛 think they consider the 916/996/998 wins collectively as they weren鈥檛 the 鈥榮ame bike. Especially not the 998, with the Testastretta engine. Whereas the 999 was basically the same for the 4 years they ran it; though I don鈥檛 remember if the 2003-04 WSBK bikes ran the boxed swingarm that didn鈥檛 show up until 2005 on the production 999R. Bear in mind, this is all pure speculation on my part. Lol


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By the way, great write-up, FBD. I agree with you about the SFS character. And whoever posted the analogy to the Porsche 930 turbo was spot on. The SFS demands your full attention at all times. Maybe more like a Carerra GT. I can鈥檛 imagine ever selling mine, even though I put thousands more miles on my MTS than I ever will on the SFS. Now if only someone will make us an aluminum tank...


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I don鈥檛 think they consider the 916/996/998 wins collectively as they weren鈥檛 the 鈥榮ame bike. Especially not the 998, with the Testastretta engine. Whereas the 999 was basically the same for the 4 years they ran it; though I don鈥檛 remember if the 2003-04 WSBK bikes ran the boxed swingarm that didn鈥檛 show up until 2005 on the production 999R. Bear in mind, this is all pure speculation on my part. Lol


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Fair point about the 998. The 916/996 was the "same" bike, in so much as any race bike is over many years. As in any race bike evolves over it's life. 916 is a misnomer as it was never raced as an actual 916cc in WSB. It started as a 926, quickly went to 955 for '95 and then onto 996.
The Testastretta 998 is basically just a new set of heads on the Desmoquattro motor and the chassis was the same bike as had been running in more or less the same form since '94
 

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Update:
I did a nice long ride on my Tuono with my regular group of riding buddies this weekend. I found myself thinking about the SFV4 and comparing it to the Tuono as I rode. Now, its been several days and my sensation from the duc is not fresh but surprisingly I was longing for the smoothness and ease of the SF over the brutish rush of the Tuono. My memory of the SF is that in very tiny amounts the throttle control is more refined, the riding position more comfortable, and the handling /turn-in more confident than the Aprilia. I have to say that these revelations are a complete surprise, I was sure that the Tuono would deliver a more engaging experience but I couldn't shake the feeling of how good the SF was to ride last week. Again the feeling was one of ease and comfort rather than one of adrenaline and excitement, I guess those things are more important to me these days than shear power. Does that mean I'm getting old?

Anyway, I'm not about to trade in my Tuono for the SF. If I am getting old I'm gonna go kicking and screaming...
I had a 17 Tuono Factory that used to be my favorite bike - prefer the 20 V4S all around. I've stopped looking for price drops on 19 TFs. Color me surprised.
 

Bon Vivant
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Discussion Starter · #39 ·
I had a 17 Tuono Factory that used to be my favorite bike - prefer the 20 V4S all around. I've stopped looking for price drops on 19 TFs. Color me surprised.
Like I said in another thread, I think if you want a more sedate and refined experience along with great performance the SFV4 is the bike to have, but if you are after a little more edgy and raw character combined with world class performance the Tuono delivers that more than the SFV4 IMO.

(When I say "performance" I'm referring to both engine and handling characteristics.)
 
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