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Brakes are important….. a trackday prior to lockdown highlighted my front brakes were not as they should be at the end of the straight, no confidence and lack of feel are words I would use to describe. During the first 20 minute session I came into the pits on lap six, packed up my gear and rode home. It would have been a bad day at the office had I continued. Normal trackday prep. has me bleed the brakes the day before, do the zip tie thing overnight, check fluids, chain etc. etc. This led me to believe a simple pad replacement was in order.

As I had a set of pads sat on the shelf, a few days later I dropped by the local ‘expert’ still thinking the pads were the problem. I waited whilst he worked, as the pads came out he looked up at me and said they were ok, no problem. A long pause ensued as I waited for him to give a diagnosis as to why my brakes were shit. I waited some more then told him just to replace the pads with the new set, paid my money and left. I had new skills to learn.

Do not read this thread as a ‘How to rebuild your Brembo callipers’ it is light reading materiel only. Brake maintenance is critical to your safety and should be carried out by a mechanic or competent person. Do your own homework I am not responsible for what you do.

First place I always look for information is Ducati.ms, to my surprise I found little to no info on the subject, hence this thread. As I was surfing the internet I started to come to the conclusion a seized piston may be the cause. My 999 has covered close to 60,000kms the original dash (6,500 miles) being stolen when the bike was imported from UK. Had the callipers ever been stripped and cleaned? Not in my 25,000km ownership and most probably never.

As the new pads had been fitted by the ‘expert’ a few days before, I went for a 200kms or so ride nice and easy. When I got back home I removed the callipers and pads. On pulling the lever with calliper in hand and observing the pistons they moved outward at a different speeds, two of them did not move at all, they were seized.

The picture shows irregular pad wear after 200kms.

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I ordered BREMBO REBUILD KIT these are probably the only item I have purchased for a Ducati that I thought are way too overpriced, it’s 16 rubber rings! I would recommend shopping around perhaps KTM have an alternative, like I said do your own homework.

MOTION PRO TOOL
Removing the brake lines and callipers is a pretty straight forward task, I made sure all bolts were cracked loose on the calliper before removal. I purchased for 30 euro the ‘Motion Pro Brake Calliper Piston Tool’, I believe this tool to be a total waste of money. I was able to remove 4 pistons only with difficulty. It does not grip the piston with any purchase and is poor in operation. If anyone wants this pm me and I will ship for free, (1 euro coin not included).

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CIRCLIP TOOL
Far better is a circlip removal tool, I paid 5 euro at the hardware store. This grips the inside of the piston causing no damage with some penetrating oil and a wiggle or two the seized pistons were no more.

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CALLIPER CLEANING

With callipers split, pistons and seals removed, some cleaning with hot soapy water and an electric toothbrush produced good results. Brake cleaner and scotch pad removed the stubborn dirt.

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PAINT
Not one to do half a job the paint pot came out, I usually do this lying on the ground so this was a treat.

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Two coats of red and a clear lacquer later.

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All this got me thinking now would be a good time to service the rear calliper and fit aftermarket lines. tbc.
 

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will that paint hold up to caliper temps? I always though calipers required special "holds up to hot lava" paint.

Also... you just use the circlip wrench directly on the pots to grab them from the inside and then lever them out somehow? (so... how did you use the circlip tool :) )

My Multi brakes have been brilliant... but I have sticky pots on my tiger and have been contemplating a rebuild.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
will that paint hold up to caliper temps? I always though calipers required special "holds up to hot lava" paint.

Also... you just use the circlip wrench directly on the pots to grab them from the inside and then lever them out somehow? (so... how did you use the circlip tool :) )

My Multi brakes have been brilliant... but I have sticky pots on my tiger and have been contemplating a rebuild.
DaveK,
I have used the same paint on Brembo callipers for many years, it lasts well with a coat of clear no issues with heat. Brake fluid damaged some paint when dismantling the calliper so I took it all off and made fresh.

Circlip tool grabs the inside of the piston/pot which causes no damage to working parts. I used penetrating oil and twisted the tool left and right until the piston came out. You will get the idea from the picture, my callipers are installed back on the bike.
985648
 

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Discussion Starter #4
REBUILD KIT

The kit consists of all you need to rebuild the callipers and the supplied pack of Brembo liquid is ample for fitting the new seals. The piston seal is square in profile and fits in the rear recess, dust seal is thinner and fits into the front recess. Pistons were gently pushed squarely into the aperture, you can 'feel' when it passes the inner seal and is home. Callipers assembled back together and pads fitted. Torque values are found in the workshop manual. I opted for new stainless hardware all round.

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Discussion Starter #5
SETTING THE CALLIPER

I read the following text on another forum and it made perfect sense to me. This is what I did….......

On Ducati’s, one must lightly tighten the brake calliper bolts then squeeze the lever a few times and bounce the front end to line up the callipers with the discs.

Then hold the brake on and do the bolts up to final torque.

This makes sure everything is lined up

Credits to the OP if you read this.

985686
 

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SETTING THE CALLIPER

I read the following text on another forum and it made perfect sense to me. This is what I did….......

On Ducati’s, one must lightly tighten the brake calliper bolts then squeeze the lever a few times and bounce the front end to line up the callipers with the discs.

Then hold the brake on and do the bolts up to final torque.

This makes sure everything is lined up


Credits to the OP if you read this.

View attachment 985686
This goes for all bikes. Check Dave Moss on YouTube for a better explanation but yes, it’s to properly seat the brakes.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
That was my point Swagger, I only learn new stuff if it's important to me. My local 'expert' should have done this, he did not. Shit, he never even torqued that critical torque value attaching the callipers to the fork legs. I would have not known this had I not been there. My online research opened my eyes.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
The rear calliper got the same treatment as the front apart from one difference. As the calliper was engraved with dirt from the rear wheel, I boiled it in a solution of Apple Cider Vinegar and Lemon juice for 20 minutes and let soak overnight. The results were outstanding. Forgot to mention I used Ferodo SinterGrip all round. I just noticed I should have 8.8 that will be changed.

Thanks for looking in.

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