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Discussion Starter #1
Hey,

Anyone got any input on brake pads for these monster stoppers? I may be changing mine out and wondered if there was something a little less abrupt or is it me?
 

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Hey,

Anyone got any input on brake pads for these monster stoppers? I may be changing mine out and wondered if there was something a little less abrupt or is it me?
One finger is all you need...:rolleyes:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Figured... I seriously only ever use 2 fingers and must have grabbed more than the tire could take, though I was leaned over slightly and panic stopping/slowing but it was just enough on my Multi.... this is no Multi!

Ok, I give... I will get into some major stopping practice first thing, I imagine time will teach me also... feel like such a turd for doing that, I usually know better.
 

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Go find yourself a big open parking lot and slam on the brakes a few times to get a feel. It's what I did and that's how I found out that you don't need a whole hell of a lot of pressure to make this rig stop! I think one of the motorcycle mags got it right when they said that these brakes would stop a planet! I don't think they were joking...
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Yup, I fell off....sniff...

I was getting used to the brakes and had it fairly under control but had this frickin issue with a combination of a blind curve (big rock wall), manhole covers (one was recessed by like 3") and the obligatory old dude pulling a left turn into a condo driveway (it is fairly new and I forgot to add it to my mental danger list).... so, I come around the curve at say 35mph and pop into my vision (around mid curve... oh, as I had set my line between the manhole covers) comes the big old side of some land yaght and I says to myself... best scrub off some speed here..... grabbed with 2 fingers on the brake lever to slow me-self down some (not put it on it's nose) and in the panic-ish situation got waay too much, or dipped into the edge of the recessed manhole cover and it grabbed more (still not too sure, I only recall thinking to myself "oh sh!t.. these brakes") and gave me a feel for a real low sider with added un-consciousness after. I hit the pavement with some really big force, knocked me-self out and even broke my spleen... on something... my own weight or a mirror or bar-end??
Anyway, haven't ridden it since... working on it (not much damage, a lot of embarassment) and have to change one of the rotors (I must have grabbed a ton as it went into the dip?) which makes the change both for better quality for $100 more than the one Duc part (in case the other rotor is slightly off also) and ask about pads that don't grab as much question come to my mind.

I even tried to sell it off as it was in it's slightly broken state but... no takers... lots of e-mails about it then some really stupid offers (because of the "damages" it would cost too much to repair) ... if they wanted a new one they should buy a new one... and it never left the dealer. So, dealer calls me and asks me to take it home to avoid more storage fees so, on the way to get it I get the "wait a minute... I have been longing for a liquid cooled Ducati for like ever and have one right there... I can't live in a shell the rest of my days (I really rang my bell on the incident) and if you want to talk about hazardous living, I work on live electricity every day!" moment.
I got there, took one look at it and said to me-self... there is really not much damage to deal with here.... I am going to ride it again!!
There was a small ding in the tank (a 3/16" chip where the bar switch group nailed it), a 1/16" ding in the frame tube (more or less dented the sticker), some scrapes (footpeg, bracket and water pump cover) a sort of smashed switch group with a scraped bar end and a warped rotor.

So, now you all know (as long as you read it) what happened and where some of my questions come from...

Sorry for the ramble here... I am usually fairly quiet about my own issues.

Trying to get it ready for next weekend, then praying for a nice day to get it to it's first service and a lovely long way home sort of ride!

Dave
 

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Bon Vivant
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wow Dave sorry to read that :(

As a matter of fact someone does make a brake pad that has less initial bite.
I don't remember who but I do remember reading abut it.
Keep checking around.

Here's a compound comparison:

Comparison of brake pad compounds


Ferodo Platinum Our first recommendation. Great performance when cold, friendly power & feel.

Ferodo CP211
Ceramic race pad, soft when cold (~3 minutes), amazing feel, great power.

Ferodo ST A slightly less dusty alternative to the platinum, & has low initial bite for a sintered pad.

Ferodo XR Throws you over the bars! Strong intial bite with much more power following.

Performance Friction Alternative to CP211; great feel, lots of power. Popular with racers.

EBC Green Stuff
Great economy OEM replacement pad. Plenty of feel, power, and dust.

EBC Sintered HH Hearty initial bite with good reserve power. Will boil fluid & not for trail braking.

Legend:
Green: semi-metallic pad; "organic" pad with great feel, progressive power
Gold: Sintered metallic pad; usually great initial bite, less feel
Note: This is an utterly unscientific graphical representation to help convey the same info that Cycleworks staff uses to answer customer inquiries about the differences between the pads. The information above is the opinion of Chris Kelley, principal of Ca Cycleworks, and is based upon his use of various braking products in his 20+ years of riding (and 3+ years racing) experience. We welcome the submission of any and all professionally obtained test results.
 

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Sorry to hear about that, Dave. Like you said, you can't live in a shell. But, you also must build your confidence and skills up. Start out slow and like the skizero said, go to a big parking lot and practice. The practice gives you the confidence to go into a panic situation and not overreact. When your confident, you can really enjoy the fine machine you have. We've all been through this type of learning situation, so you're not alone. Best of luck. Vince
 

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Dave,

Hope you recover fully from your spill, fix your dream bike and continue riding...like you said, you can't live in a shell...think positive and move forward...
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Well.... I really must say a big Thank-you to you guys.... totally unexpected! I am now REALLY glad I found this site and all of you fine peeps here! I didn't write my little blurb to get any form of sympathy, it was all me and crappy circumstances but you guys made me feel like I was "one of the herd"... thanks for that, really!

I will go to the parking lot for some serious braking practice, I was planning to do that sometime before the incident but I was trying to break in the rotors and pads and then get out there and give'er...
Now I have a really good reason to do it for sure, as you guys said, it will take a bit of confidence before I feel at home again on it... forward I go!!

Looking forward to getting the parts to get it going again, I should throw in some pics maybe?

Dave
 

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Do they have any kind of motorcycle safety course in Canada?

I'm in the military and the MSF's Basic safety course is required for us to be able to ride our bikes on base. It's VERY VERY basic, and if you've been riding for any amount of time at all you may not get anything out of it. We have to take it every 3 years. The military provides it to active duty for free. It's about $250 for civilians. It consists of a short classroom session on Friday, and parking lot course work on Saturday and Sunday mornings.


Recently the MSF has developed a sportbike rider course. Just this year the military also requires it for anybody who rides a bike where your ankles are inline or behind your hips (i.e. - not a cruiser). It's only a day long. I don't know if/when it's available for civilians. I imagine it is now. For the most-part, it's more of the same stuff in the basic course, with some combo maneuvers targeted for sportbikes. If you have a good instructor, he may find ways to push your comfort envelope with low-speed maneuvering. Even some experienced track riders may find themselves at low-speed lean angles they normally wouldn't practice on the street. It's a good opportunity to brush up on any obscure state laws that you may not know about too (For example, when I took it in Florida that's when I found out that you can be ticketed for moving your butt off the seat.). The funny thing is, the guys on the upright bikes (SV650s, FZ6s, etc.) have a much easier time around the course than the guys on the fancy clip-on equipped sportbikes. Again, a lot of the course maneuvers are pretty simple, but at the end of the day I felt glad that I went through it.

The Basic course is very much "here's a motorcycle, here's how to make it go", but if you can find a sportbike course it's a good way to establish a safe comfort zone for street riding. It's not listed on their website, but it's been available to us for about a year now.

http://www.msf-usa.org/
 

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Discussion Starter #14
You know what Zach... I think I might do something like that in the spring... I think I heard there are some courses for advanced riders around. I could also look into some track day style of course but getting that past mrs will be tough... she says I am no good to her broken so, best stay either healthy or dead...lol
 
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