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So, I had my 749 on the stands for oil change today. I tried to spin the front wheel, and there was resistance and scrubbing sound. So, I pulled the rotors off, moved the pads away, and put 'em back on. The sound and resistance went away. Then I pumped the brakes multiple times. The resistance and sound came back.. It looks like the brake pads are not going back far enough when the brake is released. Is there something I could do to fix this?

Thanks!
 

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Sounds normal to me. Pads always contact the rotor lightly has been my observation for all vehicles I've had.
 

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All disc brakes rub on the rotors. The power loss is just part of the price for having disc brakes. Drum brakes don't rub, but they don't stop well either.
 

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So, I had my 749 on the stands for oil change today. I tried to spin the front wheel, and there was resistance and scrubbing sound. So, I pulled the rotors off, moved the pads away, and put 'em back on. The sound and resistance went away. Then I pumped the brakes multiple times. The resistance and sound came back.. It looks like the brake pads are not going back far enough when the brake is released. Is there something I could do to fix this?

Thanks!
How many turns will the wheel turn before it stops? Like many have said it is normal unless you can feel it when pushing the bike. Worst case scenario is you need a caliper rebuild or if you have had the front wheel of recently you may have to realign the axle in the forks. Here is a thread with the proper sequence under "Front Wheel Installation". Hope this helps.
 

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Change the brake fluid if it has been in for more than a year.Make sure the vent in the mastercyl. cap is not blocked.Inspect the pins that hold the pads in place to see if they have any grooves that could cause the pads to bind. Look at the pads and see if the friction material is wearing evenly across the pad.Make sure the pad is free to move in the caliper.Clean the exposed parts of the pistons and inside the the caliper.If all is ok after that try to worry about something more important like what color levers you need or how much weight the carbonfiber tripletree cover will save over the billet snoozle wheezer.
 

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you're fine but if you're really worried, take out your calipers and apply some grease on the sliding pins or even go as far as using a caliper retractor to push it back out
 

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Though it is not possible to assess your particular situation over the net, some "drag" is normal. What you notice on the stands is not the same as what is happening on the move.

In racing applications it is common (almost standard practice) to use anti-knockback springs (and/or seals these days) to keep the pads/pistons from moving away from the rotors too much (we're talking a few thousandths of an inch here). The more the pistons retract the more lever travel is wasted just getting the pads back in contact instead of slowing the vehicle. In fact many/most Brembo racing pistons have nipples for the small ends of the springs (conical) to attach.

Clean all the previously suggested areas that see movement and see what happens. Beyond that I would not worry about it.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks for all the input guys.. I tried cleaning the calipers with some Brake cleaning stuff... it didn't make much difference... I will try spinning the wheel and see how many rotations it can make.
 

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Thanks for all the input guys.. I tried cleaning the calipers with some Brake cleaning stuff... it didn't make much difference... I will try spinning the wheel and see how many rotations it can make.
I had exact same problem, could not rotate more then a turn.
I also had the problem that I needed to "pump up" the brake (first pull longer then the next one). Not on my Duc, but on my Suzuki track bike.

Read most of the thread's in the Ducati and Suzuki forums, and saw so many people claiming it is normal, and so many people telling that 1/2 -2 turns is the maximum you can get.
I don't agree!!

The problem of dragging got worse after the last tire change, and I decided to take everything apart. Got the pistons out of the calipers, cleaned everything very well, installed new seals, put a very light tough of rubber grease on the seals before installing, and, very important, cleaned and smoothend out the pins holding the brake pads.

I can guarantee (!) you that after a proper installation, the pistons and pads retract, your wheel spins (almost) freely and if you had any "pump up" needed, it will be gone.

There is an other thread on the Ducati UK forum covering problems of the newer radial design.
Most of the principle is the same however, also there a very proper cleaning and light greasing solved all problems.
Guess you can find it with some searching.
 

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My 749 pads stick as well. I've always felt some brake drag is normal, but when your rotors give a big hum during launch and you can feel/hear it while crusing, I think something is up....

but i have new pads coming, so I'm just going to give everything a scrub and a change and see what happens then.
 

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You should here the grind my Iron rotors on my SP make after some surface rust sets in. Not unlike a set of finger nails on a blackboard. And these are well lubed and true full floating. I but you're over thinking it. Mark
 

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you're fine but if you're really worried, take out your calipers and apply some grease on the sliding pins or even go as far as using a caliper retractor to push it back out
With all due respect, I would avoid grease in and around the calipers. A little drag is normal. Heat can cause grease to "flow" and it could easily end up on the braking surfaces.
 

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Grease also attracts dirt.

Has anyone addressed the issue of the lever being out of adjustment? If the lever throw is too tight, the piston in the master cylinder cannot retract. Hence, fluid cannot flow back into the reservoir.
 
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