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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Having new EBC HH pads installed next week, anyone have any tips on proper brake pad bedding?...EBC says 300 miles of urban driving are required before the pads are ready for hard use, there must be a better way...
 

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You've probably have seen this, but it's from EBC's web site:

1. How to bed in your new brakes
Drive your vehicle steadily within the first 300-400 miles of road use only using the brakes violently in case of emergency. During this time use the brakes lightly and intermittently to achieve a matching between the pad and rotor which we call break in or bed in.
The speed with which perfect brake in will have occurred depends on how often the brakes are used. If you drive on a freeway or motorway and do not use your brakes for miles at a time, break in periods will be much longer. Using the brakes with caution during their early life will extend their wear life and greatly reduce the chances of rotor vibration or “shimmying” as it is known in the States. During the bed in time the pads will only contact the disc on a limited area until tiny irregularities in machining or misalignment of the pads against the rotor have been removed. You can easily see how far you have progressed with bedding in your new brakes by looking through the wheel spokes and evaluating pad contact. The rotor should look shiny and smooth across its surfaces from outside to inside in all areas of the rotor. If you have purchased EBC gold zinc or black zinc coated sport slotted rotors, all of these coatings should have been visibly removed across the entire braking area of the rotor. Break in times on European vehicles is usually considerably longer than on Asian or US built vehicles because of the design of the brake system. European vehicles use a “taller” brake pad and may tend to contact on the outer edges of the rotor first and gradually contact more towards the centre of the axle over the first few hundred miles. After you are confident that the pads and discs are perfectly mated, use the brakes on a quiet and safe road 5-6 times at medium pressure bringing the car from 60mph to 10mph. Drive the vehicle for a few miles to allow the brakes to cool and repeat this procedure. During this final break in a brake odour will almost certainly appear and this is perfectly normal. This is known as green fade where the surface resins within the pad finally cure and burn off.

This bed in procedure is for STREET driving only. For race use bed in please see notes inside the package.

Bedding in procedure for Road Race use.
Please note ….There is NO WARRANTY on any EBC product used in Racing.
To bed in brakes with new rotors, undertake this in a practice session and allow 20 medium speed "snubs" at 10 second intervals scrubbing off speed from 90 MPH to 60 MPH followed by 10 snubs taking speed from 110 MPH to 60 MPH again with 10 second intervals. This will avoid rotor pick up. If rotors are pre -conditioned against sintered pads and perfectly flat, bed in time for PADS ONLY can normally be achieved within two warm up laps with 7-10 snubs from 110 MPH to 60 MPH. Bed in time depends on rotor condition, allow longer bed in for even slightest dishing of rotors. If you have previously used carbon based pads you MUST Scratchpad or sand rotors lightly to remove carbon coating.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Just put them on and ride. I don't think they were bedded in when you bought the bike. ;)
That's good for new pads on new rotors, new pads on used rotors require bedding in so that the pads match up with irregularities on the rotors...I'm looking for a method that's a little quicker than the 300 miles of city driving suggested by EBC.
 

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That's good for new pads on new rotors, new pads on used rotors require bedding in so that the pads match up with irregularities on the rotors...I'm looking for a method that's a little quicker than the 300 miles of city driving suggested by EBC.
So what? They won't stop as well for the first few miles?

I would replace them an ride it like you stole it if I were you. :D

That was a bit of a joke. Just ride it like normal and I'm sure you will be fine.
 

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The internet's full of brake pad bedding procedures that require all kinds of maneuvers, rituals and rain-dances on un-populated roads. New pads on used rotors obviously won't work so well at first. In my own mind the common-sense thing to do happens to be exactly what EBC recommends - regular street riding until they're bedded in - just with the added provision to give yourself extra room to stop the first few times.
 

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The internet's full of brake pad bedding procedures that require all kinds of maneuvers, rituals and rain-dances on un-populated roads. New pads on used rotors obviously won't work so well at first. In my own mind the common-sense thing to do happens to be exactly what EBC recommends - regular street riding until they're bedded in - just with the added provision to give yourself extra room to stop the first few times.
That's exactly what I do - maybe drag on them a bit at highway speed a few times right after, but I don't follow those stringent guidelines. Throw em on, do as these guys say and take it easy a bit at first and then you should be good to go.
 

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About the only subject that would have more varied opinions would be "what brand and or viscosity oil to use?"
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
About the only subject that would have more varied opinions would be "what brand and or viscosity oil to use?"
Just trying to keep things interesting around here...:D
 

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About the only subject that would have more varied opinions would be "what brand and or viscosity oil to use?"
Pffft, NO!. You are wrong there is only one oil to use and that is olive oil. Preferably a fresh high quality one like Frescobaldi Laudemio which is pricey, $36 for 250ml, but well worth it. If you do have a limited budget and need it now you can use Colavita, which can usually be found in any grocery store.
 
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