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At this moment I'm trying to swap parts in my 748 SP from different Ducati's.
The 1098 fork swap is allready done.

But now the master cylinders.
Are the new generation OEM Radial Clutch Master cylinders all the same size?
According to the OEM list, the slave cylinders are compatible for most Ducati's from '00 to 2010 then it shouldn't be a problem to swap the master cylinder?

And the Radial Brake Master Cylinders? Are they the same size?
Can I swap any Ducati OEM brake master cylinder wich was original for two radial front brake calipers from one to another Ducati with two radial front brake calipers?
The SBK 848, SBK 1098, Multistrada and some Monsters are all using the same two disk Radial front brake Calipers.

Or is there something I'm missing, any info is welcome.
 

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i don't see

any link between masters being radial and the calipers being or not being radial...

pumps aplly pressure on calipers through a hose..

grtz

Koen
 

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You can use the radial clutch master it's no problem. It has larger bore which makes it easier to operate the clutch. It's the same from 999 to 1098. I've used them on my 996 with regular calipers and radial calipers.
 

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It has larger bore which makes it easier to operate the clutch.
That is not true. A bigger master cylinder will make the clutch operate harder. That is why a 19mm piston clutch master doesn’t work for our bikes. Simple mechanics show that the force to operate the clutch is equal to the stress multiplied by the area. If the stress to move the slave cylinder is kept constant and the piston area is increased, the load to operate the clutch is more, hence harder to operate the clutch. To make the clutch lighter to pull, you need a bigger slave cylinder. Again, the clutch push rod is operated by a load that is equal to the stress multiplied by the area of the slave. If the load to move the push rod is kept constant and the area of the slave increased the stress decreased. I changed to a 19mm radial clutch master on my previous bike (Aprilia RSV) and the clutch became impossible to pull. The 16mm radial clutch master made the clutch pull much easier, even lighter than the smaller OEM axial master.

The reason why your clutch became easier to operate is the change from a 996 radial master to a more-or-less radial master. When you change to a true radial master, like the aftermarket Brembo’s, your clutch will be even easier to pull. The piston of the OEM radial master is placed at an angle of approximately 45 degree. Simply math shows that you need to increase the force by factor 1.4 to give the piston a force of factor 1 (Pythagoras: 1:1:√2 for a triangle 45, 45, 90 degree).
 

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Stille wasn't referring to the Brembo after market radial. He was talking about the new gen radial which on the 848 1098. Those are not the same as the 19x20 Brembo aftermarket. Yes it would make it harder but not the 1098 master.
 

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You can use the radial clutch master it's no problem. It has larger bore which makes it easier to operate the clutch. It's the same from 999 to 1098. I've used them on my 996 with regular calipers and radial calipers.

This is true, the 999 had different looking reseviors than the 1x98s. Good pumps and the 1x98 style fit well on 996 type bikes. I switched both of mine out. A good cheap mod.
 
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