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Discussion Starter #1
I've bled brakes on other bikes, I've watched more YouTube videos than I can count, read posts on this forum so how could I actually make this lousy rear brake worse??!! I even bought a reverse bleeder and put a bleed valve on the ABS module. I just want to open up all the valves and then open up a vein and bleed out together! FML
 

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I've bled brakes on other bikes, I've watched more YouTube videos than I can count, read posts on this forum so how could I actually make this lousy rear brake worse??!! I even bought a reverse bleeder and put a bleed valve on the ABS module. I just want to open up all the valves and then open up a vein and bleed out together! FML
Hey, consider yourself lucky that you have the option to add a bleeder to the ABS module. That unit is completely tucked away on the DVT bikes.
 

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If the rear brake is the same as most Ducatis, the bleed nipple is at the bottom of the caliper instead of the top. You'll never get all of the air out with the caliper installed on the bike.

Remove the caliper and flip it upside down so the bleed nipple is at the top - then bleed it as usual.

Depending upon the stock setup, you can either flip the caliper upside down and place it on the rotor or, take a piece of bar stock and slide it between the brake pads. This is the rear brake on my 1198 but I use the same procedure on my Diavel and it works just as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Does your 1198 or Diavel have a tremendously useless rear brake? I have tried everything else so I may as well do this too. The reason I bought the reverse bleeder was so I didn't have to remove the rear caliper. Ugh! What I don't understand is that the front caliper bleed nipples are on the bottom so how come you don't have to do that to the front too? If I had any faith in the dealer, I'd just bring it there
 

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I think the shitty rear brake is standard equipment on all Ducati's

My 1098, 1198, and Diavel have all been the same. But none of them have the bleed nipples on the bottom of the front calipers.
 

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This and the DVT service are two things I just chalk up to cost of ownership and take to dealer. Even if I had the garage space and time/tools it's a major PITA. Let a deep pocket authorized dealer make your brakes work.

I reserve the balance of my saved time on keeping it clean, extending the life of the very expensive chain, slathering plastic friendly product on, and looking for the endless conga line of loose fittings.

When I lived with a tech buddy and the Snap-on vacuum brake sucker thingy we would tag team and car/truck/bike with a gallon of DOT3 and voila! No more...
 

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What I dorm which gets me to a sort of acceptable rear brake is this...

I unmount the caliper and undo all the clips that remain the brake line. That gets me enough free ply that I can put the caliper on the rear seat, and with some careful use of twine, I can keep the brake line routed so it doesn't dip or create a low spot on its way up to the seat.

Then I use my Motive power bleeder (the cap I had for my Lotus and my BMW conveniently fits the rear reservoir) filling it with a liter or more of fluid, pressurizing it, then letting it pump almost all of that fluid through the system at pressure.

I wish there was a way to trigger the ABS pumps while doing this but that’s a pipe dream. I am reasonably convinced that the last air bubble I’m trying to eliminate is in the plumbing for the linked brakes and thus not part of the regular fluid path. Maybe.

Anyway, I can lock up the rear, even if it is a little spongy. And I can definitely feel the difference when the computer is doing the linked braking thing as it firms up all of a sudden.

It’s livable. If it starts to irritate me I just wind on and pop a small wheelie. Then all is well.
 

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On my 2011, I put the bleeders on the ABS unit, then I always reverse bled the back brakes. Super-easy, takes 10 minutes and it's done.

I got the giant syringe-thingy from Aerostich.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I was mistaken about the front calipers...the bleed nipple is at the top. Front brakes have been bled and are ok. I removed the rear caliper, raised it up and bled it and got some air out of the line. I installed a bleeder at the ABS but I have not gotten any air out of it yet. I also took it out and engaged the ABS on the rear brake only 10 times as previously posted. The rear brake was much better but after a 200 mile ride, it's back to being soft again.
I was a post about a service bulletin addressing the rear brake issue but it's dated back from 2011. Should i assume that any bikes manufactured after 2011 have this fix installed? I'm debating whether to bring this to the dealer or not. I'm wondering if installing the HH sintered pads will help at all
 

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What I dorm which gets me to a sort of acceptable rear brake is this...

I unmount the caliper and undo all the clips that remain the brake line. That gets me enough free ply that I can put the caliper on the rear seat, and with some careful use of twine, I can keep the brake line routed so it doesn't dip or create a low spot on its way up to the seat.

Then I use my Motive power bleeder (the cap I had for my Lotus and my BMW conveniently fits the rear reservoir) filling it with a liter or more of fluid, pressurizing it, then letting it pump almost all of that fluid through the system at pressure.

I wish there was a way to trigger the ABS pumps while doing this but that’s a pipe dream. I am reasonably convinced that the last air bubble I’m trying to eliminate is in the plumbing for the linked brakes and thus not part of the regular fluid path. Maybe.

Anyway, I can lock up the rear, even if it is a little spongy. And I can definitely feel the difference when the computer is doing the linked braking thing as it firms up all of a sudden.

It’s livable. If it starts to irritate me I just wind on and pop a small wheelie. Then all is well.
I did something similar with success... In addition I added a speed bleeder and swapped to Dot 5.1 based on a local non-affiliated shop mechanics recommendation. After the bleed, I did a few short runs to activate the ABS (I used urban mode as that has the most intrusive ABS). Rear brake has been great for over a year now.
 

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Should i assume that any bikes manufactured after 2011 have this fix installed? I'm debating whether to bring this to the dealer or not. I'm wondering if installing the HH sintered pads will help at all
The HH helped mine. I think you need to re-bleed until the rear circuit is air free. I bleed with fresh Motul RBF600 every spring and I always have a firm pedal. A proper bleed is key but it seems most can't achieve it.
In '13 they got a 45 degree outlet on the master and a larger bore but if you keep reading that wasn't an end all fix.
 

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I read somewhere that a guy put a banjo bleeder on the rear master cylinder and no problems since. I'm thinking of trying that.
While it may have worked in the one instance, I'm not convinced that bleeding at the lowest point in the circuit will provide consistent results. The fact there was air at the lowest point I think is more indicative of an ineffective bleed to begin with.
 

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Sometimes I think this "crappy rear brake" thing feeds upon itself, we read a number of threads with lots of replies and complaints and that sets us off on a journey. "Soft" vs "Firm" always seems subjective to me, especially if you have more than one bike and are [subconsciously] making comparisons. I spent some time bleeding my rear brake last year; I also adjusted the pedal position which made quite a bit of difference to "feel". Obviously, one should take care to ensure that the brake is not binding at rest.

Now my test is simple: can I lock the rear wheel and trigger ABS at low speed, with no front brakes? If it's yes, then I'm done and stop worrying about it: in a real emergency, you're going to pull and stamp down much harder than normal; all the weight of this big bike is going pitch forward and the load is all going to be on the front tyre and brakes; imho, the contribution of the rear brake is probably limited, relatively speaking, under those conditions.
 

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On my 2013 the lever is very soft compared to other bikes I've had. However, I can kick on the ABS stomping on it in a parking lot. It is super slow to stop, but I suppose if the ABS is on I am at limits of traction anyway. For the street, I don't have a problem since I'm all about the front brake. Might be an issue for those who are doing more offfroad.
 
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