Ducati.ms - The Ultimate Ducati Forum banner
  • Hey Everyone! Enter your bike HERE to be a part of this months Bike of the Month Challenge!

Have you ever experienced a flat or a blow out with your SC's stock tubed tires?

  • Yes, I experienced a blow out.

    Votes: 1 3.6%
  • Yes, I had a flat.

    Votes: 10 35.7%
  • Nope. At least so far...

    Votes: 17 60.7%
1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Master of Bumnitude
Joined
·
5,133 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Once again an SC owner has tried to resolve the issue of the SC requiring tubes with less than complete satisfaction. Indeed, apart from spending big bucks on spoked wheels designed to be use without tubes, I know of only one success story -- that of forum member dietrichpfeifer who went where no man went before and successfully sealed his GT's wheels with (if memory serves) silicon seal.

Where does that leave most of us? In my own judgment no place bad at all: With the stock, tube-requiring, somewhat over-heavy, spoked wheels.

But I'd like to put that judgement to the test. Yes, the wheels are heavy and that is to some degree detrimental, but the big issue for many (most?) of us is the fear of a dangerous blow out, and to a lesser degree that of simply getting stranded with a flat that cannot be fixed with the wheel on the bike.

How common are those events? That is my question.

-don
 

·
Motorbike Junky
Joined
·
655 Posts
Really not common at all... It wasn't too terribly long ago that all bikes sold ran tubes... And even today, dirt bikes and dual sports run them without issue. You hear horror stories of highway speed blowouts, but the fact is that it's extremely rare. I've been running tubed tires in my BMW F800GS for years, over pretty rough terrain and thousands of street miles at a time, with never a worry or issue.

That said, I did switch over to 999 wheels on the Sport 1000, but that was really more of a weight thing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,401 Posts
Sorry in advance, hoping not to derail the thread topic (I can't vote because I've had sealed/tubless spoked wheels for about 40,000 miles), but wanted to point out a couple things about my tubeless adventure.

I won't get into the details, there are a couple write-ups about converting wheels on the forum from myself and others if you search around.

I first sealed the stock GT steel wheels with several layers of silicone, and the stock rubber rimbands that normally protect the tube from being punctured by the spokes. The steel wheels worked great with the silicon!

Next I rebuilt a set of Sport wheels with alloy rims. For some reason the silicone did not work At ALL on these wheels and I did have a failure where the silicon just did not stick once cured and I developed a leak.

I stripped the alloy wheels (actually the cured silicone just came off in one piece, very little clean up) and re-sealed them using a marine adheasive/sealant. A 3M product (3200?). I did a few layers, and inbedded a layer of fiberglass strip in between layers. This stuff is never coming off. I have had no problems, other than I will have a tough time truing the wheels or replacing spokes if ever needed!

One issue is you have to make sure you have a tire shop that is willing to mount tires on your converted rims. One local moto tire shop (all they do is moto tires) really tore my wheels up a couple times. I just use the nearest Cycle Gear and tell them the wheels are tubless. They shrug their shoulders and do a great job.

For me the conversion was worth the effort (and risk?). I have plugged a few tires out on the road, something I could not have done with tubes. I carry a small plug kit and even an emergency inflation kit for longer trips. This combined with the weight savings and better tire compliance made it an easy choice for me. Bike handles great, and several tire changes lare (from wearing them to the cords) has turned out to be a reliable modification.
 

·
Master of Bumnitude
Joined
·
5,133 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Really not common at all... It wasn't too terribly long ago that all bikes sold ran tubes... And even today, dirt bikes and dual sports run them without issue. You hear horror stories of highway speed blowouts, but the fact is that it's extremely rare. I've been running tubed tires in my BMW F800GS for years, over pretty rough terrain and thousands of street miles at a time, with never a worry or issue.
I rode bikes with tubes for years (started riding in `67) and never had a blow out. Did find one flat on my parked 305 SuperHawk, caused by a mischievous rascal with a sharp instrument back when I lived in the city, but no others. Thus the poll.

Often our imaginations distort the likelihood of a problem based not on how many times i happens, but how many times it is talked about and with what intensity.

-don
 

·
Master of Bumnitude
Joined
·
5,133 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Sorry in advance, hoping not to derail the thread topic (I can't vote because I've had sealed/tubless spoked wheels for about 40,000 miles), but wanted to point out a couple things about my tubeless adventure....
No "derail" at all Dietrich. On this subject you are the man. :)

I believe that the likelihood of a flat is less here in the east than in many other places, and that for a few reasons.

One is that there is little new construction. Thus fewer nails and the like.

Two, the snow and rain makes for frequent road cleaning.

Three, God likes us better (except for Massachusetts). :p

-don
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
85 Posts
re-sealed them using a marine adheasive/sealant. A 3M product (3200?). I did a few layers, and inbedded a layer of fiberglass strip in between layers. This stuff is never coming off.
That was probably 3M 5200. Its a well-respected marine adhesive/sealer.
But its nasty messy stuff to use.....
If you ever have to remove it, the only thing that'll give you a chance is their 'DeBond 2600' (ie half of 5200 !!!).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
711 Posts
Had one with the factory rear tire that came on my bike, rolled to a stop and was parked within maybe 2 miles of feeling the back end get funny. The tires were past the wear bars and at the end of life as it was when I picked up a packing staple that punched the tube. I figure if they had more tread on them it probably would not have left me on the side of the road.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,415 Posts
In my time, I picked up a nail in the (tubed) front tire on my '67 YR-1 while on the freeway in Southern Oregon. Pretty spooky and quick. Also picked up a nail on the (tubeless) rear of my CX-500. It went down slowly enough I could make it to a service station. So, in my experience, the tubed tire went flat faster. Although in the end, both events required a stop for service to get back on the road. Forunately, I was riding with a friend when the Yamaha picked up the nail and we stripped the front wheel off on the median strip and went in search of a patch + air.

For me, when cast wheels came on the scene in the '70's, it was a big deal. Much was made in the press and by manufacturers of the benefits of tubeless tires. The tube spoked wheel certainly is/was a well-developed technology and is servicable. Tubeless tires are inherently better (less weight, less heat, better safety, easier mounting, easier repair) and I personally didn't want to go that far "back in time", although my spoked wheels didn't give me a lick of trouble when they were on my GT. Boy did the cast wheels change the handling for the better- but that's a different story.;)

Total; 2 flats in 45 years of street riding.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
50 Posts
I was doing about 60-70 and heard a noise from the bike and didnt know what it was. Rode another half mile or so and bike felt funny. Parked up, back tyre completely flat. Tried weld fix stuff, but tyre held no pressure. Rode it slowly for another 3-4 miles on a flat tyre to my folks house and then arranged for someone to pick it up. Probably was a nail, it was a fast flat. No problems though. (GT1000)
 

·
Official Retired Person
Joined
·
7,551 Posts
I've had 4 tires on the rear of my GT - original included. 1st replacement tire lasted about 500 miles when I picked up a nail. Slow deflate, I felt it while running about 50 MPH, continued for 2 - 3 miles and made it home without the tire coming off the rim. Modern tubeless tires with tubes, on modern rims seems to me to be a fairly safe combination.

I've had several punctures, all but one on the rear, on various tube tires and tubeless tires, various bikes. Two things I've learned when running tubes - always pay for natural rubber tubes and always replace the tubes when mounting new tires. Synthetic tubes seems to shred when punctured and deflate real fast whereas natural rubber seems to get just a hole and deflate much more slowly.

Just my observation and as always - YMMV.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
399 Posts
Most flats are gonna happen on the rear tire. If a nail is lying on it's side in the roadway, it won't puncture the first tire to roll over it. The front tire flips the nail up, and then it punctures the rear tire. Flat front tires are more common on dirt bikes, where you might only run 10-15 psi. If you hit a sharp edge, the tube will get pinched between the tire and the rim, leaving two holes that look like a snakebite. I do a lot of dual sport riding on my KTM 450 and Suzuki DRZ400. I always want to be ready to fix two flats. I carry tools, two 21" tubes (they work in the rear, too) and CO2 cartridges. I do the same thing on my bicycle. When the third flat happens, I'll either borrow from my pals or call AAA if we're in cell range, but I haven't had to yet. On the GT I just carry my AAA card. I have had one rear flat on the Ducati. The GT also benefits from the accessory center stand.


 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top