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Discussion Starter #1
ok, for all you mechanics out there.. i could really use some help.
I've done this before and had no problems. This time though I'm about to go nuts here. Here's what I've been doing.
I have a one-man bleeder kit attached to the banjo bolt. I pump the clutch several times and make sure there is enough fluid in the reservoir. After a few pumps, I hold the clutch, loosen the bolt, let the fluid drain, tighten the bolt and release the handle. Repeat... only I have done this for more than 40 mins and still no difference in the clutch pressure. All that's coming out is the brake fluid.
Now I tried a the reverse bleed method, which seemed to work pretty well. Although it was still slow, I got to the point where after 60 pumps (yes I counted...) the "piston" was ready to come out of the cylinder. I installed it back onto the bike, and was ready to bleed it the regular way. After the first bleed, I lost all resistance and it was like I never did a thing.
I don't know what do to... any advice? I don't know if this matters, but my duc is on a rear stand while doing this.. could this have something to do with it? sorry about my ranting, just that its been 3 days already and it was a gorgeous day to ride, but my baby is still up on the stand :(.
 

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Hold the phone.... You can't hook up a bleeder kit ot a banjo bolt. Banjo bolt is a hollow bolt sealing with copper washers. Your bleeder kit needs to be on the bleeder screw, probably a 10mm hex head with a black rubber dust cap on it.

You need to be bleeding the SLAVE cylinder, the one down on the engine case. It has the bleeder screw on it, opposite side to your open clutch cover. DON'T TAKE IT OFF THE BIKE TO BLEED IT.

Use a ring spanner over the 10mm hex then push the rubber or plastic hose over the bleeder screw. Using the kit you can open the bleeder only a little and slowly operate the clutch lever about 10-12 times, watch the amount of fluid in the resovoir. close the bleeder and operated the bleeder a couple of timesand hold it down, reach down and crack the bleeder, count to 15 then nip the bleeder shut. job should be almost done. Most of the guys here talk about leaning the bike for side to side with a friend to help it stay off the ground but I've never had the need to do that..

By the way, WHY are you bleeding the clutch??

Mal
 

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Discussion Starter #4
oops, yea its the bleeder screw. It was late and I knew what it was in my head but just couldnt put it down correctly. I know that part but like I said, it seems like nothing or however long I do makes a difference for it to bleed right.
 

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Clutches typically bleed easily. As you have trapped air, try this first. Take the bleeder screw out of the slave. Put your finger over the hole as it will act as a check valve and pump away. This will pass a large volume of fluid. (while an assistant monitors the reservoir level.) Put the bleeder in and see whacha got.

On brakes and clutches I use vacuum. If you don't have an electric vac pump, make a catch reservoir out of a one quart glass jar. Solder a couple short lengths of 1/4" copper tubing into the lid. One hose to what you are bleeding, and another hose to the intake manifold of your car for the vacuum source. That'll really move some fluid!
 

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You might try this. This procedure has never failed to bleed the clutch (and brake) hydraulics for me. Bleed at the slave cylinder. Just snap a short piece of hose on the nipple and dangle it into a container (the hose doesn't have to be submerged in fluid).

1. Pull the lever to the bar and hold it there.

2. Open the bleed screw (at the slave cylinder).

3. Close the bleed screw and release the lever.

4. Repeat 1-2-3 (a lot).

The first several times you do this, it'll feel like nothing is happening but eventually, you'll get good "lever".

Don't stand there and pump the lever (even with the bleeder closed). This does nothing, IMO. The idea is to move the fluid towards the bleeder. Without a check valve in the system, all pumping does is further distribute aerated fluid throughout the system and you're back at square one.
 

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+1 on bleeding the master cylinder using the 6mm nut in the reservoir. Just back off that 6mm nut a bit, squeeze the lever, and then tighten the nut just before the lever hits the grip. Be sure to squeeze the lever gently or you'll squirt brake fluid everywhere. You'll need to do this 4-5 times, but that's all.

I bleed at the master before I bleed the slave, and it works like a charm every time. I don't use a vacuum pump or any fancy gear. Only a foot-long clear plastic tube over the slave bleed nipple so I can see when the bubbles come out.


Marc
749s
 
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