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I saw on the Ducati website the gloss black 1100, but I it's not on my local Ducati dealers site, and I haven't really seen it anywhere else online, except a select few times on here. Does anybody know why this is???



And if anyone has the link to the clutch cover pictures thread, hook me up, I can't find it.
 

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If any of you glossy guys get sick of shine, and want to go to the matte black look, I'm looking to swap out my plastics for the glossy ones. apologies for the hi-jack here.
 

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"The launch colors were matte black, shiny black, red and a sort of metallic white, which Ducati calls Pearl. The red is stunning, closely followed by the metallic white. The shiny black is okay if you like black. Only ride the matte black 696 if you win one in a free-to-enter competition."

-MOTORCYCLEUSA.com, "2008 Ducati Monster 696 First Ride"

Sorry, I just couldn't resist :D;)
 

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"The launch colors were matte black, shiny black, red and a sort of metallic white, which Ducati calls Pearl. The red is stunning, closely followed by the metallic white. The shiny black is okay if you like black. Only ride the matte black 696 if you win one in a free-to-enter competition."

-MOTORCYCLEUSA.com, "2008 Ducati Monster 696 First Ride"

Sorry, I just couldn't resist :D;)
??? What does this have to do with this whole thread?
 

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I have one on the floor, here if you want it. :D
 

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Resident Raggamuffin
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i like the one they have at Pro Italia, and which is for sale:

-1100S
-black frame
-gloss black panels
-black Marchesini wheels

yes, an "S" in all black.

pretty cool
 

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"The launch colors were matte black, shiny black, red and a sort of metallic white, which Ducati calls Pearl. The red is stunning, closely followed by the metallic white. The shiny black is okay if you like black. Only ride the matte black 696 if you win one in a free-to-enter competition."

-MOTORCYCLEUSA.com, "2008 Ducati Monster 696 First Ride"

Sorry, I just couldn't resist :D;)
They ran a retraction two months later after they found out the author was color blind.:p
 

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i like the one they have at Pro Italia, and which is for sale:

-1100S
-black frame
-gloss black panels
-black Marchesini wheels

yes, an "S" in all black.

pretty cool
That is a very nice bike. I looked at it before I bought my black 1100 there. Only thing I didn't really like was the black wheels; for me, I like the stock 1100s or 1100 wheels.

Also, the several other local (L.A. / Orange County) dealers I called all had black 1100 bikes in stock.

I also have to say I really like all the color combinations for the 1100 / 1100s blkes. At first, I was set on the silver / red 1100, but I'm just partial to black bikes.
 

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Question for you guys who have the gloss black M1100. I noticed that my motorcycle specific riding jeans - denim, left a small swirl on the finish where my knees were contacting the tank side panels. I was wondering if this is occurring because the side panels are plastic rather than a metal tank where as this was not an issue on my previous bike.

Its not major, but its noticeable when looking at the fine details of the bike.

Anyone else experience this, swirl markings on the side tank panels? Removal ideas - Mother's Clay Bar?
 

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Resident Raggamuffin
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Totally normal. Plastic, metal, jeans, leather, all the same. You're going to hear start fine, then go to the next, use a random orbital, don't use an orbital unless you know what you're doing, etc. Many will recommend Meguiar's Scratch-X. I have an arsenal of detailing related products including a random orbital, but can never eradicate the swirls completely. Try too hard and there's no going back. :)

Best success
 

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Question for you guys who have the gloss black M1100. I noticed that my motorcycle specific riding jeans - denim, left a small swirl on the finish where my knees were contacting the tank side panels. I was wondering if this is occurring because the side panels are plastic rather than a metal tank where as this was not an issue on my previous bike.

Its not major, but its noticeable when looking at the fine details of the bike.

Anyone else experience this, swirl markings on the side tank panels? Removal ideas - Mother's Clay Bar?
A clay bar is designed to remove rail head dust and numerous other contaminants from paint surfaces. I worked for the company that brought in the clay bar from Japan back in 1992. They recognized the significance of the product and bought N. American distribution rights and patents. In short however, the clay bar does nothing for conditions as you describe, it doesn't repair damaged paint. Swirl marks is considered "damage".

I simply rub those marks out with a rotary buffer, aka high speed buffer. I've been using them for years, but its not for the beginner or novice. With practice you can learn how to use one, but there is the real danger if used improperly you could burn the paint. In my opinion the next best option is the random orbit machine, the smaller type like the Porter Cable or DeWalt not those plastic POS from Sears. One major advantage with the rotary buffer is the fact you can use a variety of wool based buffing pads, whereas with the random orbit you can only use foam pads. Thats only a big deal if your trying to fix heavily oxidized with numerous imperfections paint or trying to pull out 1200-1500 color sand scratches. The rotary buffer with a wool buffing pad simply outcuts the random orbit with it's foam pad. However, in your case its a 50-50 proposition whether those marks will come out with a random orbit, even if you use the correct foam pad and correct compound/polish. If you need to be more aggressive with a random orbit you can take up a notch by using a more aggressive foam or a more aggressive compound or the combination together. It all depends, but you always start off with the least aggressive and move up as needed.

The beauty of the random orbit over the rotary is you don't need any training, as we used to say, "even an idiot can use it". Many companies like dealerships, carwashes and the like have opted for the random orbit as their preferred polishing machine because of liability reasons. It really takes a lot of effort to burn the paint with a random orbit, but with a high speed it could happen in a nano second. Also, many other companies are disallowing the use of wool buffing pads and instead will only bring in foam pads for use on rotary buffing machines. Less likelyhood of burning with foam in that case as well.

I normally use a random orbit for wax or polish applications, they do very well erradicating swirl marks left behind by a high speed rotary buffer when used in conjunction with a wool buffing pad. In your case I would recommend using one particular foam that is gaining more and more popularity in automobile assembly plants. The company I worked for prior to retiring made buffing pads, we sold thousands of these into the assembly plants and other facilities looking for a buff pad that repairs imperfections without leaving damage behind. The pad itself has been popular in Europe for years because it is very compatible to high solid low solvent paints. Also known as VOC compliant paints here in the USA, the Europeans are years ahead of us in implementation of these kinds of paints and they are some of the finest automobile paints in the world. The pad I'm talking about is called the Euro orange because of it's color. It is considered a cutting foam and does a remarkable job when matched with the right compound or polish. Normally after using the orange foam, if needed you go over the area with a softer foam or finishing foam. Depending on the paint, the marks you describe can be tough to remove, no problem with a high speed buffer though.

MY RECOMMENDATION:
I know I sounded like the high speed buffer is a no-no for the beginner or novice. In the case of the professional sized buffers this is true. However, I have every confidence you can learn quickly and do the job safely using a common rechargeble cordless drill. I helped develop a kit, complete with an array of buffing pads, backing plate, adaptors to be used with various machines, including your home drill. The beauty of the cordless drill is the fact it has a variable trigger mechanism and some have speed switches as well. My personal drill is the old school 450RPM variable, it is safe at that speed, not failsafe but with proper precaution (don't loiter in one spot, keep the buffer moving) you can take those stubborn tank scratches out. Care must be taken as I said about using too high of speed because speed equates to friction and friction heats up the paint. More contemporary cordless drills now go as high as 1400RPMs. Way too fast, this speed will get you into trouble if your not careful or don't have the proper training and experience. At the lower end speed, you can do it with practice and just follow some common sense tips. I guarentee after you successfully remove these scratches you will be a convert, you will be buffing everything!

The random orbit equipped with a Euro orange will remove about 80% of the scratches when using cutting Ultra cut compound by Mequiars. I'm referring to Meguiars because it is a commonly known product and actually a very good product since reformulations for the professional market. On the other hand using the cordless rotary drill with a less aggressive polish, Meguiars Ultra Finishing Polish #205 will achieve the same results if not a little better. Your stepping down from a compound to a polish because you are now using a more effective tool. Further, stepping up to the Ultra Cut Compound with the cordless drill and Euro Orange foam removes 95-98% of the scratches. You will have to look close to see them. I'll go over the area with the polish and a lessor finishing foam pad, just to pick off any polish swirl left behind. Now if it were me and I was looking for perfection and what we refer to as "Autorama" I would likely use a 100% wool pad or a wool blend buffing pad first. This will guarentee complete removal of the condition in question. However, since your using wool, you will leave behind a fine swirl, this is typical. To remove the swirl you then go over the area with the Euro foam and the Meguiars Ultra Cut Finishing Polish and finish the job with another pass with a finishing foam pad and the same polish. If you want to put the icing on the cake you can either use the finishing foam pad with Meguiars Synthetic Sealant 2.0 or by hand Meguiars Yellow Wax #26. There are a number of options open to you, but some simple rules apply. Use the least aggressive buffing medium and least aggressive buffing pad to get the job done. You only step up if you have to. The mechanics of the buffer dictates you keep the buffing pads moving at all times, apply a little pressure in the 2:00 O'clock position, this allows the buffing pad to spin freely. Otherwise, if you don't tilt up the pad slightly the buffer will want to walk all over the place, grab, skip and do other annoying things. That application of slight pressure can change as you move the buffing pad around. Its important you practice first using a clean hood of a not so special car. Lay out a "bead" of polish, which means a line of polish in this case about 4" to 6" long and position the buffing pad on the right end of the bead. Applying slight pressure at 2:00 O'clock, depress the trigger of the variable speed drill and ramp up to a slow speed and start moving along the bead from right to left. The bead will enter the buffing pad at about the 10:00 O'clock position as you move left. Once you reach the end of the bead simply go back the other way and continue to do this maybe 4 or 5 times. Do not buff until there is no more polish left, if you do this friction builds up in a hurry and this will create swirl marks. In the real life situation, using a micro fiber towel wipe the polish residue off and inspect the paint. If there are some imperfections still remaining, repeat the above process one more time. If upon inspection the marks are still there, it is time to step up either the buffing pad or the buffing medium. If you started with the orange foam pad then you would go to the buffing compound, make a pass and inspect. If this doesn't do it you bring out the big guns, either the wool or preferably wool blend (wool blend pad is yellow). No doubt this will do it, but I would rather the damage be fixed with foam pads only. Another heat principle regarding practical buffing, the trained technician will use the variable speed to create "good" friction and then back down. Or, he will bring the wool pad up on edge for more cutting action and finish with the pad flat on the surface. If he doesn't finish flat, he will no doubt leave swirls behind for going on edge with the buffing pad.

Once you become more comfortable using the cordless drill you will develop a rythym of moving it back and forth or up and down. You will get the feel of it so to speak. Just take it slow, practice and then go for it. Again, don't allow the buffing pad to loiter on one spot and be careful not to catch an edge (the gap between two body panels) of jam the buffing pad into another part of the bike that is near the work area. If you can find a cordless with a variable speed dial or switch that would be ideal, because you can dial it in at a slower speed and it will not go over that speed. Otherwise, you'll just have to have a stable trigger finger to maintain slower speeds while your still learning.

If ZDM is reading this post he can chime in on the buffing pads because I sent him a few to work with. Sounds like he has had excellent results using them.

I for one can stake the claim of having the deepest and most paint popping paint on my 999R than any other Ducati out there. I'm not kidding. All of it was done with the cordless drill and primarially the above orange foam pad followed by a finishing foam pad. Lately I've been working with the Meguiars line since a rep sent me the products to check out, the company I worked for does business with them. I'm very happy with the products and they are very compatible with the Ducati paint and with eachother. By the way, we are lucky in one respect in regards to Ducati paint, it is buffable and responds to it favorably. You will be amazed over time how good the paint is when you have to buff on it.

Sorry for the long tutorial and there is some stuff I'm sure I left out, but the bones are there and with a little patience and if you want to proceed fixing the problem on your own, I'll be happy to provide any technical or product assistance and that includes sending you the appropriate buffing kit since I brought you this far in the process. I might as well see it through to its best conclusion.

BTW, the pictured black Monster is friggen stunning. Also, I recently installed the FatDuc on my Multi and had the opportunity to take it on a long two day group ride this past weekend. Eventhough I have a stock system the FatDuc proved to be a great device, the end result is a smoother power band. Great investment.
 

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i like that look, and i really dig that photograph.

nice ride amigo.
 
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